Jump to content

Transportation of the deceased neonate

Posted

Specializes in Perinatal only!. Has 14 years experience.

You are reading page 2 of Transportation of the deceased neonate. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Not a NICU/OB nurse. Heck not even a nurse yet. As a parent whose baby has died I can tell you that the whole issue of how she was transported doesn't matter. It didn't matter, wasn't on the radar, heck wasn't even in the same universe. It really doesn't matter.

The only real consideration should be that the baby is transported in a manner that keeps other new, prospective or grieving parents from knowing that it is a/their dead baby. Seeing a baby fetus when you are going into labor could be stressful to say the least.

Anything else is mountain out a molehill.

Sandwitch883RN

Specializes in Labor & Delivery. Has 10 years experience.

I'm not an OB or NICU nurse, so I thought about this from the prospective of a parent. If it were my child, I would prefer the fetus either carried or wheeled in a similar manner that a living baby would be transported. In either regard, I would expect the baby to be covered with blankets and the body treated with respect. The angel basket would offend me horribly, and I would throw a fit if they tried to take my dead baby away in a bag or plastic container! Remember that to someone, this is a child not simply the products of conception.

To most L&D and nusery nurses this is a child also. I've cried when preparing a fetus for the morgue. We wrap them in a chux then wrap again in a blanket. They are carried to the morgue in the arms of a staff member. It always makes me sad to see them carried away completely wrapped up. I know very well the pain and grief of the family even from a bystanders point of view. It's very humbling to be part of that families time of grief.

BittyBabyGrower, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, educator.

Your hospital should have a policy in place. We have specific morgue bags for the baby and it is either carried by the mortality services person or in a bassinett. We have to wrap the baby with three id tags on and in the wrapping.

We also have body bags. I think it is the most neutral, inoffensive way to transport

I had started at the hospital as a transporter, and we were still in training when we had our first morgue visit. Two other women were standing outside with a picnic basket. Naturally being new, my partner exclaimed, "Wow, a picnic ... what are you doing here with a picnic basket?" I think at that moment, we both realized what the deal was.

So, in our hospital they use a picnic basket ... I'm not to keen on picnic baskets anymore. Really ... how often do you see nurses with picnic baskets??

flightnurse2b, LPN

Specializes in EMS, ER, GI, PCU/Telemetry.

i don't work OB but when i worked in the ER we were responsible for the hospital's morgue transport.

we had a bassinette (sp) like they have in the nursery that we put the baby in with wheels on the bottom. the L&D/OB nurse would prepare the body and wrap them in a little blanket and put a little hat on their heads, and then they would wrap them in a tiny tiny white shroud...

StrwbryblndRN

Specializes in CMSRN. Has 9 years experience.

"wow, a picnic ... what are you doing here with a picnic basket?" i think at that moment, we both realized what the deal was.

so, in our hospital they use a picnic basket ... i'm not to keen on picnic baskets anymore. really ... how often do you see nurses with picnic baskets??

that is why i would think anything that brings attention to the staff transporting the infant would be horrible. picnic basket, decorated float, etc. who wants to try and explain what they are there for. staff who is handling the infant is most likely emotional as it is. makes for an awkward situation.

administration should be enlightened to this and hopfully change their policy if it does not meet the needs of everyone involved.

Elvish, BSN, DNP, RN, NP

Specializes in Community, OB, Nursery.

I've seen it done both ways - carried in a blanket and covered up; or in a bassinet with a drape over it. It's my feeling that either is appropriate. I've never ever met a family member that cared one way or another, as long as their baby was respected.

Not a NICU/OB nurse. Heck not even a nurse yet. As a parent whose baby has died I can tell you that the whole issue of how she was transported doesn't matter. It didn't matter, wasn't on the radar, heck wasn't even in the same universe. It really doesn't matter.

The only real consideration should be that the baby is transported in a manner that keeps other new, prospective or grieving parents from knowing that it is a/their dead baby. Seeing a baby fetus when you are going into labor could be stressful to say the least.

Anything else is mountain out a molehill.

I've been in those shoes, (my little boy) and it did really matter to me how he was transported and taken care of, but I think it was because it was the last bit of mothering I could do. That's how I know how Jamisen was transported and every step from there because I made the nurse explain it all.

You can never assume it because it did not matter to you, that it won't matter to someone else and their life.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.