Jump to content

texting at work

Posted

You are reading page 3 of texting at work. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

When my kids were young they were very aware that if they called me at work I would ask them, 1) is it oozing like capillary blood or is there actual spurting more like arterial? and 2) are there flames involved?

In other words, learn how to deal with the minor inconveniences of life without having your mommy on the phone, is what I tried to teach them. Definitely I'm here for you whenever you NEED me...but you are going to have to learn to defer minor issues until I get home from work.

Based on that, some would say I wasn't a very good mom.

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

My iPhone has apps for critical care and drug information - now I have to wonder if people think I'm texting when I'm checking compatibilities or referencing something work-related.

I have thought exactly the same thing. In fact so much so I have shown my instructors what I am doing. I guess I am paranoid.

SummitRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention. Has 9 years experience.

Like all things, if it gets in the way of work or care, it is unprofessional. If you have a few minutes of downtime, then no problem.

Key_

Specializes in Telemetry/PCU. Has 2 years experience.

However, if I want to know a lab and I'm in a different hospital or on the road, texting is wonderful.

So texting while driving? Don't want to end up as your patients roommate!

Our unit got so bad with texting and inappropriate use of the computer that now both are banned. Sucks for the rest of us, but something needed to be done. Unfortunately it was only a few nurses that were abusing, too bad they didn't just write them up.

GooeyRN, ADN, BSN, CNA, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Med/Surg, LTC. Has 21 years experience.

I don't really care if people text while at work, as long as they aren't constantly doing it, and not doing it around patients. Doing it once and awhile to check on the kids or whatever is fine by me. Same as a quick 2 minute phone call to check on things is fine by me. But having conversations via text really isn't cool with me. Nor is several or extended phone calls during non break times. Just don't do this stuff in front of patients or when things are BUSY and I have no problem.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

As a shift supervisor, I do not tolerate staff texting or talking on a cell phone when working with residents. I'm OK with them using their phones on breaks---I figure what they do on their personal time is their own business---but I don't want to see an aide stopping in the hallway to text or chat, and if I catch anyone doing it in a resident's room, it's a guaranteed write-up. It's unprofessional and RUDE to boot!!

Where I work, some *doctors* are so busy texting and IMing their buds. Yes, and others too, including nurses and paras. I wish people would focus.

JP2011

Specializes in Labor & Delivery Tech.

Wow a lot of angry people on this board. My floor has a policy about no cell phones. They are supposed to be off at all times. This is unpractical. Co-workers (RN, MD & PCA) usually text between ourselves. 90% it is patient care related, 10% it's about misc. stuff. The thing I have an issue with on my floor is that you barely have time to take a break, in fact we have assigned breaks on a sheet, but they are never taken, so when we do text on our down time it's bad, but my charge nurse and the smokers can go out three times a night for ten minutes.

well, the people texting on their iphones at ED where I work are not texting work-related texts. they are showing their drunken pics from recent nights out on town, updating FB, fwding jokes, etc. obviously, work-related texts, or even short, personal texts, phone calls, etc., are expected on long shifts. :eek:

Key_

Specializes in Telemetry/PCU. Has 2 years experience.

We had an aide that was sitting and would update her FB from her phone about how she had just watched 2 movies and how she couldn't believe they were paying her for it. Well I guess she forgot that she had many coworkers on her FB and word got around. Needless to say she isn't with us anymore.

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

I don't really care if people text while at work, as long as they aren't constantly doing it, and not doing it around patients. Doing it once and awhile to check on the kids or whatever is fine by me.

I don't know how I survived my obviously neglectful parents when growing up. They never checked up on me.

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

Wow a lot of angry people on this board. My floor has a policy about no cell phones. They are supposed to be off at all times. This is unpractical. Co-workers (RN, MD & PCA) usually text between ourselves. 90% it is patient care related, 10% it's about misc. stuff. The thing I have an issue with on my floor is that you barely have time to take a break, in fact we have assigned breaks on a sheet, but they are never taken, so when we do text on our down time it's bad, but my charge nurse and the smokers can go out three times a night for ten minutes.

Don't get me started on smokers getting more breaks than others.

Now back to our regular programming....

Should you be texting patient updates? Probably not. Can't possibly be a secure method of treating pt info.

cherrybreeze, ADN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

It is absolutely a generational thing, so I stand by my comment. Of course there are exceptions to the rule. There are exceptions to EVERY rule. But, you cannot argue with the fact that it is definitely "kids" that do more texting. My nephew is 10 and I can't believe how much the boy can text. For those that are older (let's say, 30 and up...I'm thisclose to 30), we didn't grow up texting, and while I do plenty of it on my offtime, my phone stays in my locker when I'm not on break. No exceptions. I was surprised the first time I even saw someone pull their cell out of their POCKET while working. That certainly isn't the work ethic I learned. I go on Facebook (at home) and the "textspeak" used in status updates is strictly limited to a younger generation of people (wonder why?). It's all related. I never go online at work, either; I see our younger generation of nurses updating Facebook from work. It was unheard of when I started at the hospital 8 years ago (and yes, at 21). For those nurses that are in their early 20's and don't do it, that is great. Seriously, I mean that. I'm sure there are plenty. But it is much more rare to see someone that is older than that constantly texting.

For those that think it's no big deal, even if it's not constantly...you wouldn't be TALKING on your cell phone constantly at work, and the principle is no different. When you're at work, you work. Done. Texting docs regarding patients is a totally different thing. If that's not what you're doing, put the dang thing in your locker until you leave or are on break. It should not be tolerated.

tokyoROSE, BSN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room. Has 2 years experience.

Okay, I admit it, I send a ridiculous amount of texts. Around 5,000 a month to be exact. I'm 19 and a student.

When I'm in clinicals, my phone is in my bag at all times. I think it is so unprofessional to use your cell phone at work when you're on the clock. I wouldn't ever dream of doing that. I'm so busy that I don't even bother checking it during breaks. Those texts can wait until I'm done. It is that simple.

Hoozdo, ADN

Specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections. Has 15 years experience.

If I couldn't text at work I could not survive the shift

You work in med/surg and have the TIME to text? Why not ask a coworker if they need help instead of texting? Send someone on break and watch their pts instead of texting. Try restocking items instead of texting. There are hundreds of useful things you can spend time on instead of texting.

GooeyRN, ADN, BSN, CNA, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Med/Surg, LTC. Has 21 years experience.

I don't know how I survived my obviously neglectful parents when growing up. They never checked up on me.

They didn't check on you when you were sick? (assuming you were sick sometimes when they had to go to work, of course. Maybe that didn't happen.)

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

You can indeed text pt updates to providers provided you do not use their full name: for instance, I text first name and last initial - that is what our practice (and HIPAA) has deemed compliant.

tvccrn, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 20 years experience.

Wow a lot of angry people on this board. My floor has a policy about no cell phones. They are supposed to be off at all times. This is unpractical. Co-workers (RN, MD & PCA) usually text between ourselves. 90% it is patient care related, 10% it's about misc. stuff. The thing I have an issue with on my floor is that you barely have time to take a break, in fact we have assigned breaks on a sheet, but they are never taken, so when we do text on our down time it's bad, but my charge nurse and the smokers can go out three times a night for ten minutes.

Why is it unpractical? 5 years ago you would have never had a thread like this and things got done then. So it was a bit more work. Texting and cell phone are NOT a necessity to life, they are a convienence and should be treated as such.

You do not have a right to use you cell phone at work.