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texting at work

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23 years old. Enough said.

It has nothing to do with her being 23 years old. I work with nurses well into their 40's who can't look up from their cell phones. I'm 24 years old and frankly I'm a little insulted. Enough said.

Bortaz, MSN, RN

Specializes in CDI Supervisor; Formerly NICU. Has 12 years experience.

Just like anything, texting and such only becomes a problem when it starts interfering with doing your job. No different than surfing the web, talking on the phone, or just sitting around the nurses station talking about the people that are off today.

I see nothing wrong with the occasional text message, in the rare times you're not needing to do something for (or to) your patients. I see plenty wrong with ignoring your job duties and incessantly texting or surfing or chatting or whatever.

23 years old. Enough said.

...Im 20 and as soon as I walk into work mine goes off. Please do not stereotype.

Sparrowhawk

Specializes in LTC.

It has nothing to do with her being 23 years old. I work with nurses well into their 40's who can't look up from their cell phones. I'm 24 years old and frankly I'm a little insulted. Enough said.

Yep..23 and insulted too..I hardly ever text @ work and def not during pt care.

jennjen512

Specializes in SICU, CCU, MCU, peds, physician's office. Has 7 years experience.

I admit I occasionally text at work, but I always excuse myself to the breakroom when I do so. I have also been known to send a text to a doc that says "Call me in CCU when you get a sec, no rush" Then again we know our docs really well and have their cell phone numbers. They really like for us to do this so their pager isn't going off constantly. Again, it isn't all the time or all day long and definately not when I should be doing patient care!

catshowlady

Specializes in ICU.

I text the docs regularly too. We have a couple that respond better to text pages telling them what you need rather than just a phone number.

I will occasionally send personal text messages at work, from the breakroom only. I also do not like it when people are gluied to the cell phone while call lights are going off.

:paw:

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

If I couldn't text at work I could not survive the shift

Exactly how old are you?

nursebrandie28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care/Teaching.

Who cares? It is their license!! I personally text when appropriate, never in a patient's room or seen by staff, patients or families....but why let it bother you so much? That just causes more friction between co-workers...and to all those complaining...have you ever confronted the nurse themselves??

I think texting is just another "behavior" that needs to be done in moderation and appropriateness!! My grandma pulled her foley out, got out of bed fell and died and the "40 ish" year old nurse was NOT texting but on a smoke break!!!

dansamy

Specializes in Going to Peds!.

I think texting is just another "behavior" that needs to be done in moderation and appropriateness!! My grandma pulled her foley out, got out of bed fell and died and the "40 ish" year old nurse was NOT texting but on a smoke break!!!

*Just to play "devil's advocate"* And that may very well have been that nurse's only break all shift. Most of the time, I only pee once during my 12hr shift. If I am lucky, I get to wolf down my lunch in 10 minutes flat. If she went on a break, she (should have) reported her patients' conditions to the remaining nurses on the unit and they were the ones responsible for the lapse in care. If there was a bed alarm and grandma's nurse didn't set it, I could lay some blame at her feet too.

Edited by dansamy

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

If I couldn't text at work I could not survive the shift

Seriously? That's rather pathetic.

I text once in a blue moon at work. Doesn't seem to be an issue on my unit.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

23 years old. Enough said.

I'm 23 and have probably sent 2 text messages total at work in my 18 months as an RN, and those were most certainly during down time. My phone stays off in the locker room at work. Please stop generalizing.

My iPhone has apps for critical care and drug information - now I have to wonder if people think I'm texting when I'm checking compatibilities or referencing something work-related.

Virgo_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac Telemetry, ED.

My iPhone has apps for critical care and drug information - now I have to wonder if people think I'm texting when I'm checking compatibilities or referencing something work-related.

I have a Palm Centro and I've wondered the same.

MedSurgeMess

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.

I have a Palm Centro and I've wondered the same.

You can tell if someone is texting or looking up info......believe me, I have kids who live to text, and I have apps on my phone as well.....there is a difference, and it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure it out.

Higgs

Specializes in Med/surg. ED. Palliative. Geront. Has 20 years experience.

...just hope you remember to clean the superbugs off your phones before you go home...

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

And texting does have its place at work: the nurses in one ICU that I cover have hospital-issued cell phones and they text me (the APN) with pt updates as well as requests for orders. I must call them with an order...no texting of orders allowed. However, if I want to know a lab and I'm in a different hospital or on the road, texting is wonderful. It lets both of us do what needs to be done NOW and then allows us to wait for a response so we aren't interrupting each other.

My docs text too and again....its more productive. I text personally very little.

I think that, overall in our culture, there has been a shift concerning what is okay to do while at work. In the past I think employees had a very clear sense that one's time belonged to the employer who was paying for one's time, appearance, and attitude when dealing with both external and internal customers. Not just in healthcare, but everywhere from a Ford Motor Co manufacturing plant, to a hospital, to Denny's.

Somewhere over the past few years that has changed dramatically. People get upset that they cannot work with the public at Bed, Bath & Beyond (for example) while also having green hair and 20 piercings all over the face. Don't even get me started on people who are supposed to wear uniforms of whatever kind but insist on "personalizing" them to the point where you cannot tell who works where when you need assistance.

Personal texing on the job -- just like making personal phone calls, updating your Facebook, discussing the date you had last night with your coworkers where the public has to listen to it, applying tons of make-up or cologne for work, using foul language -- all these are things that should be saved for personal time off the job. Whether that means a break or your day off.

Texting for work-related needs is an entirely different deal. I believe that falls under the heading of the use of any new technology in the world of healthcare in that it can be a great tool and resource, but we must make sure it does not alienate our patients. We have to be mindful that there are many who do not use computers still, let alone texting and the use of smartphones for referencing info, and we need to be professional and let them know what we're doing when the situation warrants that.

Incidentally, age is not a factor here. Last week I sat next to a 50+ nurse in report who was wearing so much cologne I started to feel nauseous and lightheaded. It was a great scent, but should have been saved for her time away from the hospital.

tvccrn, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 20 years experience.

I can remember when you didn't take personal calls while at work. If someone called for you (provided it wasn't an emergency) a message was taken and you called back on your break.

I NEVER take my phone out of my locker while I am supposed to be working. My children and spouse know not to call me between the times of 7 and 3:30 unless:

1. there is copious amounts of blood involved.

2. a body part has become detached.

3. there has been a loss of life.

I think is just plain unprofessional and rude to have a personal phone out on the job.