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Survey for a school project

Posted

Hi everyone,

I joined all nurses because I wanted to find out how much nurses and student nurses know about Jean Watson for a school project. If you have the time to answer at least the first question, I would REALLY appreciate it, even if you have no clue who she is. :-)

1) What do you know about Jean Watson? (Please don't use Google. That's fine if you know nothing about her)

2) How do you know what you know about Watson? (did you learn about her in nursing school, a workshop, ..?)

3) If you are in nursing school, are you in the 2 year program or the BScN program?

4) If you are a nurse, did you graduate from the 2 year program or the BScN program? And how long have you been working as a nurse?

5) What country are you studying nursing, or working as a nurse?

6) What do you think of her work? Do you think students should be taught more about it?

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

1) What do you know about Jean Watson? (Please don't use Google. That's fine if you know nothing about her)

2) How do you know what you know about Watson? (did you learn about her in nursing school, a workshop, ..?)

3) If you are in nursing school, are you in the 2 year program or the BScN program?

4) If you are a nurse, did you graduate from the 2 year program or the BScN program? And how long have you been working as a nurse?

5) What country are you studying nursing, or working as a nurse?

6) What do you think of her work? Do you think students should be taught more about it?

1) I'm thinking she is the "caring" person, although someone with the name "Roach" also comes to mind, so I'm not entirely sure.

2) I remember her name, but not much else.

3) I'm not in school.

4) I graduated from an ASN program. I've been a nurse for seven years.

5) USA

6) I think it's "fluff" and among the least useful types of things taught in nursing school.

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU.

There are 3year diploma programs

what has your research demonstrated?

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

1). Nothing at all.

HeySis, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 25 years experience.

Never heard of her.

I am a nurse, graduated from LPN program in 1993

and ASN program in April 2016.

USA

Since I don't know her or her work, those are the only comments I can give you.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

1) What do you know about Jean Watson? (Please don't use Google. That's fine if you know nothing about her)

Never heard of her or, if I have, I've long since forgotten about her.

2) How do you know what you know about Watson? (did you learn about her in nursing school, a workshop, ..?)

See #1

3) If you are in nursing school, are you in the 2 year program or the BScN program?

N/A

4) If you are a nurse, did you graduate from the 2 year program or the BScN program? And how long have you been working as a nurse?

A) 4 year BSN program

B) 9 years

5) What country are you studying nursing, or working as a nurse?

USA

6) What do you think of her work? Do you think students should be taught more about it?

See #1.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I had the privilege of meeting Jean Watson -- she was a participant in a professional nursing activity I was involved in. I distinctly remember that she wore an "orb" pendant necklace that emitted a chiming sound whenever it moved. When asked about it, she indicated that it helped her remain centered... but it was really distracting to everyone else. She appeared to really live by her own philosophy.

I love her theoretical work & find it very applicable in practice.

Hi everyone,

I joined all nurses because I wanted to find out how much nurses and student nurses know about Jean Watson for a school project. If you have the time to answer at least the first question, I would REALLY appreciate it, even if you have no clue who she is. :-)

1) What do you know about Jean Watson? (Please don't use Google. That's fine if you know nothing about her)

One of the several nursing theory people we studied.

2) How do you know what you know about Watson? (did you learn about her in nursing school, a workshop, ..?)

3) If you are in nursing school, are you in the 2 year program or the BScN program?

BSN right out of high school

4) If you are a nurse, did you graduate from the 2 year program or the BScN program? And how long have you been working as a nurse?

Eons and eons.

5) What country are you studying nursing, or working as a nurse?

USA

6) What do you think of her work? Do you think students should be taught more about it?

I think that people who scoff at the idea of nursing theory are more task-oriented and less professional than they think. Nobody develops a nursing theory, a theory about what nursing is and how it comes to be that way, without a good deal of work as a nurse and the thoughtfulness to think about why we do what we do. People who have the intellectual capacity and take the time and effort to think about their professions have the potential to enrich us all.

There are lots of theories about nursing-- I have a favorite myself -- but I liked what Jean had to say about two things in particular: 1) nursing can't be done without a basis in caring, and 2) the scientific method isn't neutral and it gives us the chance to change with good reasons.

Ladyscrubs

Specializes in Nursey stuff. Has 36+ years experience.

1. Okay…Jean Watson, I think she is big into environmental influence in the hospital—like a mini me Flo Nightingale. For some weird reason I associate her with Buddha and becoming one with our patients. I also remember the Tardis or maybe that had something to do with Dr. Who…WAIT… the caritas something or other!

2. I am a Martha Rodgers fan cause she liked Star Trek, and her theory sounded like it came from "The Force," and I think Jean is also into spiritualism. I did a paper on Martha years back, so I think Jean crept in also.

3. I am not, but my diploma program used Marjory Gordon

4. Diploma – many moons ago: BSN I think mentioned Orem and my MSN didn't even bother

5. U. S. A.

6. I prefer true philosophers like Descartes… I think you are my patient, therefore you am or is it are? But seriously— I did my thesis on Therapeutic Touch and I believe there is more to healing then the physical. My patients are more than a corporal body. I do believe these theories need to be studied and just not mentioned in passing and would love to take an actual class, taught, by those that can actually teach, understand, and explain them.

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

1, 2) I recognize her name as a nursing theorist, but am not familiar with her theory

4) I graduated from an ADN program in 2003 and a BSN program a year ago

5) USA

6) My experience with nursing theory is limited; my BSN program faculty as a group ascribed to one particuar theory (not Watson's.) However what I learned about said pet theory was pretty useless. It did get us thinking from the patient's worldview, thereby more able to help them...I would have loved to learn MORE about how to put this into practice in the real world where some days you are too busy to eat, let alone worry about the hospital room's qi. This theory was also in bed with new age spirituality. I was irritated because I was paying all this money to elevate my nursing practice, not new age spiritual practice.

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

1. Her name sounds vaguely familiar but I really have no idea who she is.

2. See above.

3. In a BSN program.

4. Still a student

5. USA

6. Don't know who she is / not familiar with her work.

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

I think that people who scoff at the idea of nursing theory are more task-oriented and less professional than they think. Nobody develops a nursing theory, a theory about what nursing is and how it comes to be that way, without a good deal of work as a nurse and the thoughtfulness to think about why we do what we do. People who have the intellectual capacity and take the time and effort to think about their professions have the potential to enrich us all.

I had the privilege of meeting Jean Watson -- she was a participant in a professional nursing activity I was involved in. I distinctly remember that she wore an "orb" pendant necklace that emitted a chiming sound whenever it moved. When asked about it, she indicated that it helped her remain centered... but it was really distracting to everyone else.

I guess I'll just have to take the anti-intellectual, task-oriented, unprofessional, thoughtless hit, then ...because this caring theory and orb nonsense does not speak to me. I find it pretentious.

If you don't know where you're coming from, you don't know where you're going. Personally, I'm coming from Orem's Theory of Self-care Deficit. Briefly, it says that nursing provides for people what they aren't able to provide for themselves and will again when/if they are able.

"Orem's approach to the nursing process provides a method to determine the self-care deficits and then to define the roles of patient or nurse to meet the self-care demands. The steps in the approach are thought of uas the technical component of the nursing process. Orem emphasizes that the technological component "must be coordinated with interpersonal and social pressures within nursing situations.

The nursing process in this model has three parts. First is the assessment, which collects data to determine the problem or concern that needs to be addressed. The next step is the diagnosis and creation of a nursing care plan. The third and final step of the nursing process is implementation and evaluation. The nurse sets the health care plan into motion to meet the goals set by the patient and his or her health care team, and, when finished, evaluate the nursing care by interpreting the results of the implementation of the plan."

Well, that's up to you.

As for me, I believe that if you don't know where you're coming from, you don't know where you're going. Personally, I'm coming from Orem's Theory of Self-care Deficit. Briefly, it says that nursing provides for people what they aren't able to provide for themselves and will again when/if they are able.

"Orem's approach to the nursing process provides a method to determine the self-care deficits and then to define the roles of patient or nurse to meet the self-care demands. The steps in the approach are thought of uas the technical component of the nursing process. Orem emphasizes that the technological component "must be coordinated with interpersonal and social pressures within nursing situations.

The nursing process in this model has three parts. First is the assessment, which collects data to determine the problem or concern that needs to be addressed. The next step is the diagnosis and creation of a nursing care plan. The third and final step of the nursing process is implementation and evaluation. The nurse sets the health care plan into motion to meet the goals set by the patient and his or her health care team, and, when finished, evaluate the nursing care by interpreting the results of the implementation of the plan."

There are other theories that work better for other folks, such as Roy's Adaptation Model:

"The goal of nursing is to promote adaptation in the four adaptive modes. Nurses also promote adaptation for individuals and groups in the four adaptive modes, thus contributing to health, quality of life, and dying with dignity by assessing behaviors and factors that influence adaptive abilities and by intervening to enhance environmental interactions. The Four Adaptive Modes of Roy's Adaptation Model are physiologic needs, self-concept, role function, and interdependence.

The Adaptation Model includes a six-step nursing process.

  1. The first level of assessment, which addresses the patient's behavior
  2. The second level of assessment, which addresses the patient's stimuli
  3. Diagnosis of the patient
  4. Setting goals for the patient's health
  5. Intervention to take actions in order to meet those goals
  6. Evaluation of the result to determine if goals were met

Throughout the nursing process, the nurse and other health care professionals should make adaptations to the nursing care plan based on the patient's progress toward health."

There are others. You might look at what you do for patients differently depending on what model speaks to you most. Like I said, where you go depends on where you're coming from.