Jump to content

too soon to be an NP?

NP Students   (1,164 Views 10 Comments)
by mads197 mads197 (New) New Student

122 Profile Views; 5 Posts

Im a senior nursing student now getting ready to graduate in May 2020. My plan is to take the NCLEX in June and start working in July. The school I'm at currently is switching from masters to DNP for their NP programs. The director came and spoke to our class saying that they're opening up applications to students to start the BSN-DNP program in August 2020 as long as we are board certified before then. Is this too soon to go back to school? I plan to still work throughout it as much as school will allow me, so I'll be getting nursing experience as I go. I've heard so many mixed things about years of experience you 'should' have prior to starting. Any advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SopranoKris is a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

3,066 Posts; 32,762 Profile Views

I think it depends on which specialty you want to pursue. If you're look at acute care? No, I would get some experience as an RN, particularly ICU or ER before pursuing that specialty. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 Posts; 122 Profile Views

33 minutes ago, SopranoKris said:

I think it depends on which specialty you want to pursue. If you're look at acute care? No, I would get some experience as an RN, particularly ICU or ER before pursuing that specialty. 

I'm looking to get a FNP and work with pediatrics in primary care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FullGlass has 1 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

5 Followers; 2 Articles; 919 Posts; 8,062 Profile Views

3 hours ago, mads197 said:

I'm looking to get a FNP and work with pediatrics in primary care

You can go straight from BSN to MSN FNP.  Primary care NP programs do not require RN work experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

56 Posts; 128 Profile Views

Hey! I’ve talked to a few NPs about this and I think it depends on how strong your medical background was before nursing school. Otherwise they may recommend working for 1-2 years minimum before transitioning to an NP program. I stumbled across your post because I might be starting nursing school in January and want to get into a new grad ER residency right after grad and apply to NP school after a year of working (fingers crossed) I currently have working in the ER as a scribe for 2.5 years so I am familiar with acute care NPs but it mainly depends on how prepared you feel to make the transition from nurse to provider because it’s a whole different ballpark. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

umbdude has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

2 Followers; 951 Posts; 14,334 Profile Views

It's not too soon especially if you're going to work while you're getting your NP. However, I'd recommend putting maximum effort during semesters that you have your NP clinical (get as many hours as possible and read beyond the NP curriculum), and cut down on RN hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

580 Posts; 10,752 Profile Views

I have a friend who did a direct-entry NP program, received no RN experience beforehand, and is a peds NP. You do not need to have RN experience beforehand for primary care.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sehnsucht specializes in New Grad Dec 2019.

18 Posts; 92 Profile Views

What programs will allow a new grad RN to get their FNP?

Do most hospital jobs work with new hired RNs to accommodate FNP classes and clinicals? 

I talked to my local University, and they only had one masters program, in Education, that was completely online. All the others had traditional classroom lectures in addition to clinicals.

I was afraid that it would be asking "too much" of my hospital to schedule my RN Residency around my school schedule when I could just do online courses like everybody else and just do a BSN easy peasy. After my residency, sure, but I don't want to waste any time getting more degrees. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

adammRN has 10 years experience as a BSN and specializes in pmhnp 2020.

235 Posts; 4,989 Profile Views

I think it takes on average a couple of years to really get good at base hospital nursing. It's great exposure to medicine and learning multitasking, compromising with people, all that which you don't learn in school. Those are valuable providers skills. However, you will get (my program does 1200) but it's doctorate level of clinic time. So... you may find that sufficient. But yes, make sure you put forth your best effort if you choose to go straight BSN->DNP/FNP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

580 Posts; 10,752 Profile Views

4 hours ago, adammRN said:

I think it takes on average a couple of years to really get good at base hospital nursing. It's great exposure to medicine and learning multitasking, compromising with people, all that which you don't learn in school.

I don't see in OP's first post about how she wants to work in a hospital. 

@mads197, I think it's really up to you. If you think you want to work in a hospital, then sure, get some hospital experience as an RN. If you think you'd like to work outpatient, then you probably don't need to get hospital experience as an RN. Everyone told me I "had" to work in med-surg when I got out of my BSN program but I knew what I wanted to do and so did not. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×