elementary to middle or high school

  1. I am being moved in the fall from my beloved elementary school to either middle school or high school. I do have some say which it will be. Which, in your minds, would be a better choice? Pros and cons would be very helpful for me. I have no experience working with these age groups, only the elementary bunch. Neither school has a nurse now, so I'd be starting from the beginning....Any info would be greatly appreciated!
    mc3
  2. Visit mc3 profile page

    About mc3, LPN

    Joined: Jun '05; Posts: 1,028; Likes: 1,757
    from US
    Specialty: 12 year(s) of experience

    12 Comments

  3. by   Mango Juice
    I really like middle school - it is a good balance of young (chronologically and maturity-wise) students and students who are starting to turn into little adults. I cannot imagine working at a high school, but I know my colleagues love it!

    I have only worked at the middle school level, so I cannot offer a pros/cons list. Phones are a problem either way though!
  4. by   OldDude
    I'm in elementary...I think I'd pick high school if I couldn't get a job on a crab fishing boat in the Bering sea or as a semen extractor on a turkey farm. Middle school...too big to be little...too little to be be big. Ugh
  5. by   mc3
    The problem is, I love my littles!
  6. by   OldDude
    Quote from mc3
    The problem is, I love my littles!
    Hear ya.
  7. by   GmaPearl BSN RN
    Elementary now. High School would be my next choice. I have no desire to work on a turkey farm, OldDude!!!
  8. by   ruby_jane
    There is a loving-kindness that elementary nurses have which, frankly, I don't possess as a high school nurse. I am in awe of you who have it, though. Your love of the littles may make you happier in the 6-8 group....although I have to say you might be happy when you find out how relatively self-reliant high schoolers are. I mean, they lie to you and they've googled their symptoms. But my diabetics require only minor reminding (checking insulin doses, not drawing them up). You have to be an excellent historian in high school. There are fewer calls to parents in HS, but the ones I have are usually doozies. Best of luck as you decide what to do.
  9. by   iggywench
    I was in an intermediate school (5-6) before switching to 9th grade. I love this age level, because they will take your advice, and not cry and throw a fit if you try to send them back to class. I would not want to work in a junior high (7-8 here), because they have lots of students in athletics, with no athletic trainers. The nurse handles all of the sports injuries and the concussion return-to-play protocol at that age level here. At my school, all athletes, band, and ROTC students have a physical on file with the trainers, and see them with their injuries.
  10. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from ruby_jane
    There is a loving-kindness that elementary nurses have which, frankly, I don't possess as a high school nurse. I am in awe of you who have it, though. Your love of the littles may make you happier in the 6-8 group....although I have to say you might be happy when you find out how relatively self-reliant high schoolers are. I mean, they lie to you and they've googled their symptoms. But my diabetics require only minor reminding (checking insulin doses, not drawing them up). You have to be an excellent historian in high school. There are fewer calls to parents in HS, but the ones I have are usually doozies. Best of luck as you decide what to do.
    THIS.

    When I have to call home in HS, it is typically a bigger deal. Sport injuries. So much fatigue because no HS sleeps enough. I typically get all the sexual health stuff as well. Which I don't mind as I also teach sex ed so the kids know who they go to.

    MS students are a trial, but also a joy to see some of the major maturing they can do it 2 short years. I work with grades 7-12 and grades 7 and 8 make up high of my daily traffic alone.
  11. by   mc3
    One big problem I already see is that MS and HS now just text their parents to come pick them up if sick. There are no HS or MS nurses, this is new for them. There's going to be a big unhappy shock when students and parents won't be allowed to do this anymore. And who do you think they're going to yell at about it?
    I'm so sad...
  12. by   grammy1
    I'm in a 7th-8th jr. high. I could never do elementary anymore, just don't have the patience or energy. Pros at this age, if you have a really bad group (we know that sometimes happens), you only have them for 2 years. Cons, the great groups and kids that you absolutely love, you only have them for 2 years.

    Puberty is a really rough time for diabetics. I see more high-low swings at this age than I ever did at elementary or even the older high school kids. The hormones wreak havoc with insulin. It can be quite challenging.

    The growth and maturing you see in these 2 years is unbelievable. They would have to drag me kicking and screaming to an elementary or high school.
  13. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from mc3
    One big problem I already see is that MS and HS now just text their parents to come pick them up if sick. There are no HS or MS nurses, this is new for them. There's going to be a big unhappy shock when students and parents won't be allowed to do this anymore. And who do you think they're going to yell at about it?
    I'm so sad...
    That is an administrative issue. Meet with the principal, see what the policy is and figure out with his/her help how to enforce it. Also...six years in I am just shrugging that off. It irritates me that parents say they're on their way but go check in with the nurse. If you've decided to come get LD, I have no say in this but I'm happy to tell you they don't have a fever, and by the way, would you like them to wait in attendance for you??
  14. by   pedi_nurse
    Eh, I'm in a MS and deal with this. However, I just say that the parent is free to pick up their student, but that it will not be an excused absence unless they bring a doctor's note. It's not worth being bothered by it. My only frustration is when a parent calls me saying their kid called reporting they broke their arm (or something else equally unrealistic) and mom wants to know what is going on and I have no clue. OR even worse, when a teacher or sub calls a parent and tells them they need to pick up their kid. Now THAT is frustrating.

    ETA: I'm a BIG fan of MS (6th-8th graders). It's such a crazy time in their lives and you have a huge opportunity to educate your kids about self care. They also are young enough that plenty of them still want to please you or act like kids, but old enough to have a straight forward conversation with them. Also, they are old enough that you can tell them kindly to tough it out.
    Last edit by pedi_nurse on Feb 13

close