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RN, ADN being obsolete

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I've been an RN since 1982. I went to a hospital based diploma program because I already had a bachelor's degree in something else. I have NEVER had a problem getting a job and I've been in management for the past 20 years. Not having a BSN has not impacted my career in the least. Now that I am usually the one hiring, if it's a choice between a new BSN and a new diploma grad, the diploma grad wins every time.

I thought diploma programs had been pretty much phased out. I wish their were some around me when I was looking to go to nursing school; I would have picked the diploma program and being a new nurse wouldn't have sucked near as bad.

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Thats really great, unfortunatley where I am ADNs are phased out except for LTC and homecare, and the region is saturated with nurses as is. Starting wages are less than they were 18 years ago because that is what happens when supply balloons and demand shrinks, which is part of the problem with too many nurses in one area. Employers start combining jobs, so what was three jobs became one, and so on. Starting RN wages in a hospital were $22 per hour when I got out 18 years ago, now they doubled the education requirement to 4 years and starting wages at all the region's hospitals are $23, so all this BSN garbage is just a scam for the colleges to enrich themselves.

People don't believe it, but I tell them that the wages for new nurses have been near stagnant for the last 20 years. It's ridiculous. As for the BSN scam, I agree.

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I am going through this problem as a 2 year RN degree is being phased out everywhere, except for homecare. For 10 years there was work for the 2 year degree RN, but the last 8 years, almost nothing. I live in an area where there are way too many nursing schools churning out nurses at all levels, LPN, RN, BSN and MSN, practioner. ..and not enough jobs to supply the workforce. Consequently, you wind up with a couple hundred applicants for a handful of jobs. Do not even get me started on the way area employers have feasted upon the lopsided supply/ demand...to put it nicely, wound up walking out of an interview because I could cut the arrogance with a knife. Just like having too many burger joints in 2 square miles, there is no way to stay in business with supply and demand out of sync...but that does not stop all the bogus "10,000" sign on bonus job ads that are fake, and the continued false propoganda of a nursing shortage that never existed in the first place. OK, rant over, thank you for listening. I am now working nights at target, per diem homecare, and weekends on a farm ...so much for my 2nd career and all the money I spent for nothing.

Wondering if you live in my neck of the woods! Nursing wages here are low, and new grads fight for jobs. Most nurses travel to Louisville, Indy or Cinci for work due to lack of jobs in our area, as more seasoned nurses usually get the jobs that are desired. And some of our LTCs are asking for BSNs at this point. Also, in regards to comments on stagnant wages, I'm only making a couple bucks more than I did starting out 20 years ago as an ADN and now MSN, and other nurses that I know at the same level are singing the same song regardless of degree. Local hospitals only hire BSNs to do nursing, ADNs and LPNs are hired to do CNA work only, not allowed to do other work per their P&P, and they don't do tuition assistance to help get the BSN! Thank goodness for low cost of living, most of my bills being paid off, and OT when I need it. Sad...

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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People don't believe it, but I tell them that the wages for new nurses have been near stagnant for the last 20 years. It's ridiculous. As for the BSN scam, I agree.

I know. This false propaganda of "nursing shortage" is one of the greatest hoaxes that was ever construed and perpetuated upon the workforce. Over the summer I saw a new grad BSN who told me that not even one of her classmates had employment after graduating with a BSN. A BSN is an RN is an RN is an RN, and the thought of people graduating with $80K of student debt not to have a job is sickening. Watch, once the BSN level reaches a saturation point, like the ADN did, they will up the ante to an MSN. Its coming, and its sad.

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Wondering if you live in my neck of the woods! Nursing wages here are low, and new grads fight for jobs. Most nurses travel to Louisville, Indy or Cinci for work due to lack of jobs in our area, as more seasoned nurses usually get the jobs that are desired. And some of our LTCs are asking for BSNs at this point. Also, in regards to comments on stagnant wages, I'm only making a couple bucks more than I did starting out 20 years ago as an ADN and now MSN, and other nurses that I know at the same level are singing the same song regardless of degree. Local hospitals only hire BSNs to do nursing, ADNs and LPNs are hired to do CNA work only, not allowed to do other work per their P&P, and they don't do tuition assistance to help get the BSN! Thank goodness for low cost of living, most of my bills being paid off, and OT when I need it. Sad...

Its basically a state wide problem here in PA, a nursing surplus, with the worst areas being Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Allentown. Does not help that PA does not belong to the nursing compact license state, so once you have your PA license, its really a pain to transfer it to other states. This is why there is such a surplus of nurses here...guessing you are talking about KY?

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There are simply not enough schools offering a BSN to graduate enough nurses to fully staff every single place that hires nurses in the country. So no, the ASN is nowhere near obsolete. That being said in an area with a competitive job market a BSN will make finding a job much easier.

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Its basically a state wide problem here in PA, a nursing surplus, with the worst areas being Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Allentown. Does not help that PA does not belong to the nursing compact license state, so once you have your PA license, its really a pain to transfer it to other states. This is why there is such a surplus of nurses here...guessing you are talking about KY?

Hoosiers are in Indiana -- and it is definitely not this way in the entire state.

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None of the hospitals around here require a BSN. They prefer a certification over a BSN. ADNs get hired just as easily. They are both registered nurses with the SAME SCOPE OF PRACTICE.

Why would a hospital prefer a lower education over a higher one?

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Why would a hospital prefer a lower education over a higher one?

Because an ADN RN with a specialty certification is statistically more likely to be an expert in her area of nursing than a BSN RN who has no certification.

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Why would a hospital prefer a lower education over a higher one?

Really? You really went there?

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Really? You really went there?

Pump the brakes on the drama. I was legit asking. I'm a pre-nursing student applying to a BSN program, so this is relevant info for me. From what I understand, it's the speciality certification that is more attractive to a hospital, which I assume can also be attained with a BSN.

Edited by ehayes215
typo

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Pump the brakes on the drama. I was legit asking. I'm a pre-nursing student applying to a BSN program, so this is relevant info for me. From what I understand, it's the speciality certification that is more attractive to a hospital, which I assume can also be attained with a BSN.

No drama but don't be fooled, no matter what drivel they spout off in school having a BSN does not bring anything special to the table when it comes to bedside nursing. A BSN may be a higher degree but that's does not necessarily equate to a higher education. Broader, yes, but not higher. The additional courses in most BSN programs have little to do with nursing.

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