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Resigned... then hospital wants me back???

Posted

Specializes in Medical/Surgical, Ambulatory Care. Has 5 years experience.

Hi All;

Just wanted to get some insight. I recently sent a resignation letter to my supervisor of my fairly new job (I was only a week into orientation before I decided to quit). I ended up leaving for a large number of reasons, which mainly encompassed "half-a**ed" patient care, compromise of safety, and just an overall negative work environment.

I checked my email about a few hours after sending the resignation notice, and I got a response from my manager, basically asking me to stay and give them a chance to work it out and offer any suggestions to make it better (believe me, it's a whooooole lot that needs to be done here). What would you all do? Would you give it a second chance, or just leave?

I also have two interviews set up at a more established facilities (which is Magnet), but the only issue is that they are about an hour away from home. The job mentioned above is only 2 miles from my home. Would you go to a better facility that's further out, or try to work it out at a hospital that's close, but has major issues? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

BlueChocolateCat

Specializes in CVICU, CCRN. Has 2 years experience.

I have had experience with a variety of different hospitals. Poor inner-city hospials, large urban research campuses, averge community hospitals, and county hospitals.

Yeah, I have been exposed to a lot of situations where patient care seemed to be lacking. It can be extremely upsetting at times. However, I am just suprised that you were able to establish such severe defecits in patient care after only getting through your first week of orientation?

I don't know the details of the situation; however, I was always taught to never burn bridges. Unfortunately, because you have already technically resigned, I feel like you would have already burned that bridge regardless of weather or not you continue employment there. So, I really don't know what to say at the point you are at. All I can say is that you DO NOT want to bring up this situation ever again at any future interview or job you may have. Because after only being there a week, I find it impossible that you could have established enough backup to justify your decision to any future employers.

So I guess frankly, you might just want to stay firm with your decision because I don't think you will ever be able to fully mend this one with your most recent employer.

tmartin83

Specializes in Medical/Surgical, Ambulatory Care. Has 5 years experience.

Thanks BlueChocolateCat :-)

It was painfully obvious, unfortunately. Being on the floor, seeing and hearing nurses bad-mouth the floor, severe staffing issues (on my third day of orientation, THIRD DAY, I was actually pulled to be a CNA with 13 pts on a different floor from where I was orienting, and had no idea where things were, was locked out of their supply/linen room), oh I could go on and on, hahhahah!

Having said that, do you think it was a good idea to resign? I just totally felt as if my orientation time was pooped on and there was no lack of concern for it. I mean... it was the worst feeling ever having to constantly ask another nurse I've never met to open the door to the supply room and just overall relying on everyone to do things because I didn't have the access/capabilities to do so.

I was totally prepared to burn that bridge, unfortunately. I just never expected to get asked to come back and give it another try. They actually want me to continue orientation tomorrow, so Im prepared to give it another chance. Perhaps this is some test??? Oh yeah, I'm definitely not gonna bring this up at my interview... I'm just hoping and praying they don't ask about it at all...

Based on my overall employment experiences, I would tend to be very leery of the request. I would tend to think they want me back so that they have the upper hand and if, or when, they decided it is time for me to go, it will be under their terms. In other words, they would fire me, thus ruining my future opportunities as much as possible. I am sorry, but this is how I see it, based upon years of watching how employers treat their employees. I would not go back.

"I ended up leaving for a large number of reasons, which mainly encompassed "half-a**ed" patient care, compromise of safety, and just an overall negative work environment."

Since you seem confident that this is the case, why would you want to work here?

bell1962

Specializes in family practice and school nursing. Has 30 plus years experience.

Based on my overall employment experiences, I would tend to be very leery of the request. I would tend to think they want me back so that they have the upper hand and if, or when, they decided it is time for me to go, it will be under their terms. In other words, they would fire me, thus ruining my future opportunities as much as possible. I am sorry, but this is how I see it, based upon years of watching how employers treat their employees. I would not go back.
This! Be careful

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

You've made your decision.. move on.

Their attempt to keep you is strange ,to say the least.

Realize that a "magnet" rating for a facility ... means squat.

amzyRN

Specializes in ED, Cardiac-step down, tele, med surg.

Take the interviews at the other hospital and see how you feel about it. Don't feel obligated to stay at a facility that is sketchy. There are plenty of them out there. I have experience working at such facilities. There was a nursing home I worked at for 2 weeks and I was out of there fast. Listen to your gut. The commute can suck and I understand that aspect, so actually going to the facility and seeing how it feels to drive there and back will help to gauge how it will be.

offer recommendations to improve the place but do not go back. If it was that bad after only one week, it must be a pretty terrible place.

tyvin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice / Psych / RNAC.

Don't compromise your integrity; you resigned for a reason. Old saying "Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me."

Also; technically, you're not burning a bridge if you resigned under professional circumstances (nice departure and all that). You must have if they're asking you to come back. Burning a bridge involves bad blood.

Continue to be civil and professional.

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 9 years experience.

I did something similar. I had been applying to a hospital close to me (they are going for magnet status) for 4 years and I finally got an interview for a PRN position. They wanted me 2 days a week, but I already have a full time job (60 hours a week, every week is tooo much), so I accepted a prn (I decided how many hours I work). I got rear-ended on the way to orientation and I took it as a sign. Something didn't sit quite right when the job was described to me. I resigned the position. They did try to get to make me change my mind, but I didn't. I drive 40+ miles to my current job (has magnet status-I do think it matters-I live in a very competitive area-3 level 1 trauma hospitals; 2 of them top notch teaching facilities). I would not leave my job, or jeopardize it for another place. I love it.

Wave Watcher

Specializes in Community Health/School Nursing. Has 7 years experience.

Leave. I think they are still short a CNA and they want you back. ;-)

Go find bigger and better opportunities. Be happy.

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

You've resigned for obvious reasons. Why return?

Pulled to another floor to be a CNA for 13 patients? No thank you. Perhaps it is a sign they need to hire more CNA's. It is hard enough to get all of the charting and other stuff under one's belt, but to float to another floor disrupts that flow.

Floating is a difficult thing, there are nurses who love it, others not so much. Apparently, the facility has a number of nurses in the latter. So why not just make the new nurse do it.

I do not know if having conversation regarding your issues with the place will change anything or not going forward for you. But on the other hand, are you willing to commute for your job? Additionally, for you to say "I don't feel I am getting an adequate orientation" may result in a bunch of promises, but with little positive outcome.

Until such time as you start orienting new nurses. And there's a boatload of staff. Then, you will become a disposable commodity. That would be my biggest fear. As other posters have alluded to, they only need you when they need you, and then you are on your own. Probably at just about your probation mark, provided they have other staff in place.

Magnet is not the be all and end all. Trauma centers, level whatever....if that is your kind of nursing it can be a good thing. However, not sure how long you have been a nurse, and be mindful that most want you to have some sort of experience in emergency care. And teaching hospitals don't always mean teaching the nurses. Just go in with eyes wide open, with your own personal goal in mind. And the fact that is it within your comfort zone to have a substantial commute to and from work on a daily basis--especially I you have to start on the night shift?

Many things to consider, but only you know what your ultimate goal is as a nurse. If you have resigned effective immediately, I would be cautious about going back. If they would like to have an exit interview with you, that is for you to decide if it is worth it. However, if your resignation is 2 weeks from now, you would be obligated to finish out those 2 weeks. And print out that email that says they want you to continue working. So going forward, if they say they "let you go" or some other not eligible for rehire nonsense, you have something that proves otherwise.

And finally, do not assume because you have an interview that you will get the job. Be sure that you have an offer letter in hand.

Best wishes and let us know how it goes!

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I did something similar. I had been applying to a hospital close to me (they are going for magnet status) for 4 years and I finally got an interview for a PRN position. They wanted me 2 days a week, but I already have a full time job (60 hours a week, every week is tooo much), so I accepted a prn (I decided how many hours I work). I got rear-ended on the way to orientation and I took it as a sign. Something didn't sit quite right when the job was described to me. I resigned the position. They did try to get to make me change my mind, but I didn't. I drive 40+ miles to my current job (has magnet status-I do think it matters-I live in a very competitive area-3 level 1 trauma hospitals; 2 of them top notch teaching facilities). I would not leave my job, or jeopardize it for another place. I love it.

Not trying to derail this thread, rather add do it.

Why do you feel Magnet status matters? I have worked in several. The Magnet status is an achievement for the hospital. I never saw any of the 5 Forces of Magnetism fully implemented.

It's not been shown to provide a better work environment.

firstinfamily, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I am kind of mixed. The last place I left because they kind of set me up for failure and that was not on my game plan. You may have crashed but you have not burned yet!! Believe it or not there are managers who want you to fail. Your license is your domain, you have control over it and exposing it to a toxic environment that can result in some negligent action is not a place for you to stay. They may be playing into your ego by asking you to stay, it sounds like they are low on staff. How did the other staff you worked with act? Did they seem like zombies who were working and not really paying attention to what was going on??? That is most likely because they have become numb to the circumstances, and they may not have any options but to continue to work there. There must be some term for this syndrome as I have seen it and it feels WRONG!!! Believe what you are seeing and feeling, trust your gut and leave. Yes, you might have to suck it up by driving to another facility, more cost for gas, less cash for home, but your license is what you should be mainly concerned about!!!! Also, Magnet does not necessarily mean a better environment, it is a good marketing tool, and sounds really great, but nurses on this site have expressed their disappointment and the realities of working magnet may not be what you think. Good Luck!!