Jump to content

Please help, feel trapped

Nurses   (1,250 Views | 21 Replies)
by Guest716906 Guest716906 (Member)

1,313 Profile Views; 43 Posts

Hello, I have been a nurse for 5 years. 4 years med surg telemetry. 9 months hospice case management. I'm totally burnt out on hands on patient care. I want to work in an office. I want to work at a desk. I just cant do hands on patient care anymore. I'm applying to all kinds of hands off patient care jobs, barely any jobs are contacting me back. It's taking forever to secure another job. I want to put my 2 weeks in at this job tomorrow. I have bills but I'm about to just use a credit card until I can secure another job. I just cant work here 1 more day. I'm at my wits end. Please help 😞

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 Followers; 4,056 Posts; 31,226 Profile Views

18 minutes ago, Tele RN 92 said:

I'm about to just use a credit card until I can secure another job. I just cant work here 1 more day.

Yes you can.

If you hate it to the very core of your being right now, imagine what kind of desperation will befall you when your debts are out of control. Don't flush money down the drain on account of a job you hate. Really think about that--it's therapeutic: Don't grant even more control over your life to something that is already having a negative effect! I know you think that getting away from it will limit the negative effects, but that thinking only accounts for what is tangible (and overwhelming) to you right now.  Don't fail to take into consideration what's realistically going to happen when you can't pay off your CCs each month and are racking up high interest and fees on top your debts themselves.

Again: Do not let something that is causing you considerable difficulty right now wreak even worse havoc in your life.

* Instead, change your thinking to protect your sanity so that you can hang in there until you have other means of income. Take some time to think about the work-related things that have been stressing you, and ponder which ones don't require the amount of emotional energy that you have been granting them. Rude docs/coworkers? That's their problem. People unhappy that they don't get what they want instantly because you can't do everything at once? That's their problem. Running all day long? Do the best you can and quit feeling bad that you can't do it all. Wherever possible, recognize situations that aren't ideal but also aren't your doing or your ultimate problem. Your role is to use your skills to make things better to the best of your ability.

* Do all the other things job-searchers must do, like getting some opinions on your resume, preparing for interviews, etc., etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scuba nurse has 30 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN.

523 Posts; 4,023 Profile Views

How about school nursing? Look to sub first. 

Do not quit until you have another job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 Posts; 1,208 Profile Views

I totally feel your pain 😕 I was like for many years working on a trauma unit. Then I went part time in inpatient rehab which is much better than trauma but same old problems (short staffing, terrible nurse aides, no lunch breaks, upset families). I finally got the courage a couple of months ago to interview for a non-bedside nursing job. I have a phone interview today to learn more about it. Even if I don’t get this job, I still feel good about getting the ball rolling to find a different job. I would suggest that you get a calendar and cross off everyday that you get through work. Maybe set a goal to have a new job by the end of Spring/beginning of Summer. You can do it! You don’t want to start off a new job being thousands of dollars in debt. I truly wish you good luck! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CritterLover has 21 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER, ICU, Infusion, peds, informatics.

925 Posts; 11,718 Profile Views

What part of the country are you in, and what is the job market like?

Have you tried looking at one of the major job boards (such as indeed) and searching for corporate type nursing jobs? A lot of the big insurance companies post jobs there. The big benefit there is that many large insurance companies don't care where you live and you can often (though not always) telecommute, so even if the job market is tight in your area you can still often find something. Make sure you check them out on glassdoor though.

Clinical liaison might also interest you -- that is the nurse from the LTC/Rehab facility that goes to hospitals to evaluate patients for suitability for admission to that particular LTC/LTAC/Rehab. 

Staff development might also be a option. Or maybe look for positions with device manufacturers if you don't mind a lot of travel.

Some addiction/recovery centers use RNs to dose subutex/methodone/etc. I had always thought they used medication techs for that but I worked with a nurse who left to go do that so at least some places hire RNs. I think she was doing some counseling as well though.

If your IV skills are decent and you don't mind some direct patient care I'd encourage you to check out infusion centers. If I lost my FT job and couldn't convert my casual job to FT, an infusion center would be my first choice.

Depending on what you are burnt out on, the OR or a procedural area might not be a bad fit either.

Good luck -- I hope you find something that you enjoy 🙂 .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

16 Followers; 1 Article; 6,679 Posts; 82,563 Profile Views

12 hours ago, Tele RN 92 said:

I just cant work here 1 more day. 

Many look at quitting a job or getting fired with the same intensity as death by torture, when really, it can be a growth learning experience.

In the very least, you'll learn, "Oops! I shouldn't have done that!"

Or not.

I quit a job without having another lined up and been terminated from... let me think, here... three jobs in 37 years of nursing.

Each was truly a learning experience. There was pain, but, as they say, "in pain, there is growth".

Your mental health is more important than some soul-sucking job.

The very best to you, TeleRN!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NRSKarenRN has 40 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

5 Followers; 10 Articles; 14,754 Posts; 163,299 Profile Views

Please contact your facilities Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to get advice on your burnout.  Many EAP provide few free phone sessions/visit.   This can help you bide some time until can obtain a desk position.

Best wishes moving forward

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Followers; 37,379 Posts; 100,212 Profile Views

Do not quit now. If you think it is unbearable now what do you think you will feel like when you don’t have the money for your rent or mortgage, much less utilities or food? If you must, take an emergency stress leave (time off) of a minimum of three days in addition to your days off. Get this in writing from your doctor. Rest, recuperate, steady your thinking, and start a job search. Best wishes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

1 Follower; 4,267 Posts; 29,932 Profile Views

It takes some time, connections and strategy to land a non-bedside nursing position. These jobs are competitive. During the interview, you will also need to convince the interviewer that you are seeking the position for what you can do, not because you don't want to do bedside anymore.

Rather than quitting right away, can you use up any PTO you might have remaining?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Followers; 4,688 Posts; 36,231 Profile Views

19 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

Do not quit now. If you think it is unbearable now what do you think you will feel like when you don’t have the money for your rent or mortgage, much less utilities or food? If you must, take an emergency stress leave (time off) of a minimum of three days in addition to your days off. Get this in writing from your doctor. Rest, recuperate, steady your thinking, and start a job search. Best wishes.

But don't put the real reason on this doctor's note.

Are you eligible for FMLA?  Yes, you will have to give a reason but I don't think you can be denied FMLA if you meet the eligibility criteria. You can use the time to job hunt.

Have you thought about becoming a nurse for an insurance company?  If you have current experience in Med Surg, Peds, OB, or other major specialty, you could probably do Case Management or Utilization Management.

Want to be a wound/ostomy nurse?  IV Therapist?  Employee Health?  Occupational Health?  Wellness Screener/Biometric Screener?  Go on Indeed or the other job boards.

What exactly is the problem with your job?  What would make it bearable?

Figure out how to cut your expenses way, way down so you can live without an income for a while if need be.  Got anything you can sell?  Take in a renter?  Move in with your family for a while?

Work for an agency.  You can try different facilities and areas of nursing that way, see if you like them.

I wish you all the best.  Update us when you can.

Edited by Kooky Korky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

T-Bird78 has 6 years experience.

864 Posts; 14,461 Profile Views

I feel you—and I work in an office. We have the same problems, being short-staffed, crazy patient loads, and ornery doctors. I have a coworker who leaves at lunch two days a week and one day a week at 4:00 to go to school. That puts my location short-staffed by one MA three days a week, and two of those days we have two physicians. We see 40-55 pts a day between the two doctors, and a third one has expanded their hours to have their last appt at 5:00. Our working hours are supposed to be 8:30–5:00, yet we’re still seeing pts starting at 5:00. One doc has even had Saturday hours because we’re booking so far out for pts. One doc has the “I’M the physician” attitude and doesn’t listen to input from we mere nurse peasants.  I have a desk but I’m up more than I’m down. In my 8 1/2-9 hour days (five days a week with a 30 minute lunch), my FitBit shows I’m standing 14 hours a day and I hit my 8,000 step goal daily. I’ve been thinking about leaving healthcare completely. I’ve been doing this for 13 years and it gets more and more BS.  Hang in there and know that you’re actually making a difference to people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SandIsMyGlitterRN has 20 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nursing.

94 Posts; 403 Profile Views

On 3/9/2020 at 12:52 PM, scuba nurse said:

How about school nursing? Look to sub first. 

Do not quit until you have another job!

I am a school nurse because I was burnt out working crazy hours.  I love it!!  It is much more challenging that I thought it would be.  I have great hours and still get to use my assessment skills all day.  The school I work in has a high number of children with special needs so my skills are very useful here.  I have children with trachs, caths, daily seizures, etc.  Depending on the state you will work in you may have to go back to school to get your school nurse certification but it may be worth it in the long run.  Hang in there!  We have all felt the same way at some point in our careers.  You got this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.