Jump to content

Please don't expect CNAs to

Posted

Nurses (and other medical personnel), please quit expecting a CNA, all by herself, to lift/transfer a 250-300 pound person. If a person is that freaking huge and is designated as a two-person transfer, get a clue by four - I am NOT going to transfer that patient by myself. So please quit expecting me to do it. You will have to WAIT until I can find another person to help. Please grow a brain if you don't understand this.:cry:

I agree, not only is it dangerous for the patient it is dangerous for you! If I need a patient lifted that takes two people to lift, I grab one CNA and me! That makes two, sounds like you need a hug!

I agree. I wouldn't even attempt to do something like that by myself.

3 people might be more realistic. But you really need a hoyer.

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

It is unfair for any other CNA or nurse to expect someone to do this independently. It really toasts my cookies to see this happen. Everyone is human and has the right to go home in one piece.

TreehuggerRN

Specializes in LTC, med-surg..

Two people shouldn't even be lifting a person that big.

Your facility needs a lift.

oh my gosh, i think that's totally INSANE to expect anyone to do that...SAFELY!

that really chaps my hide.

nevermind our backs, it's truly shabby judgment on any nurse who delegates that.

as a cna, i would express concerns (with the nurse) about the safety factor, and the orders for a 2 person transfer.

holy cow, batman...

that is just soooo uncool.

pffffft.

leslie

I am NOT going to transfer that patient by myself. So please quit expecting me to do it.

You know who you REALLY need to get mad at? Your fellow CNA coworkers who violate saftey rules and DO transfer that person by themselves. They are why the nurses expect you to do it.

I work on a woefully understaffed TCU Unit at a nursing home. 3 Aides for 32-36 patients. Many are total care, brain surgery, quadriplegia, hemiplegia, severe dementia, PVS, end of life, wandering, fall risks, behaviors - the whole thing. It isn't care, it is triage - the "most acute" (ie sitting/lying the longest time in their BM) get attention.

Management refuses to add a single aide so we can at least provide a slightly less criminal level of care.

A couple aides on my floor have started to do 2-person transfers (with hoyers or without) by themselves to speed things up in hopes of getting people changed and into bed. They are the ones who really **** me off.

Yes, I'm looking for another job.

mamamerlee, LPN

Specializes in home health, dialysis, others. Has 35 years experience.

At one facility where I worked we had slide boards - they were wonderful. Still needed at least two people. Always need at least 2 people!

ctmed

Specializes in PACU, LTC, Med-Surg, Telemetry, Psych. Has 4 years experience.

My friends, what is listed above happens alot more often than you think.

Much of it is this disturbing culture that seems to be in many facilities where LPN/ RN will not "touch" a patient other than to give meds or do assesments because it is beneath them in some way or they "have more important things that only they are only trained to do" like sit at the desk and chart. Even other CNAs in some places refuse to help sometimes because it would be "doing someone else's job for them." These are the same places where the RNs will roll thier eyes and huff even if an IV goes off and they have to get up!

Please do not flame me. I have worked at wonderful places with wonderful, caring people who are always glad to help. But working agency, I have run into just as many places with the situation happening like above. Of course, if something bad happens, like you drop someone.. it is always the CNA's fault with various forms of punishment from a write - up to firing to report against certificate depending on how bad and how far someone presses it.

Im not saying do the job and get used by a lazy CNA, but help. A nice place to work begins by helping folks out and being cool. But, Im just a CNA... so my opinion may not matter. (It least in those places)

KimberlyRN89, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg/urology.

Much of it is this disturbing culture that seems to be in many facilities where LPN/ RN will not "touch" a patient other than to give meds or do assesments because it is beneath them in some way or they "have more important things that only they are only trained to do" like sit at the desk and chart. Even other CNAs in some places refuse to help sometimes because it would be "doing someone else's job for them." These are the same places where the RNs will roll thier eyes and huff even if an IV goes off and they have to get up!

Are you one of my coworkers? This sounds like exactly what I am experiencing :(

We have quite a few residents at my facility on hospice. One of them is over 300lbs. Someone upthread mentioned using a hoyer lift. Well sadly we don't have one. I work at an ALF, so we don't have things like that:sniff: Our RSD wrote on the residents care plan that now she is a four-person transfer. I'd really like to know how that is feasible considering there are only two people (if we're lucky) working in that section(of 15 residents, with 3 others on hospice btw) & no one in other sections want to help us transfer her. :angryfire And rather than address the issue, we get reprimanded for other things such as "Family members are complaining that you all are banging the dishes while washing them" or "I dont like the pajamas you are dressing the residents in..they look flimsy".

Forever Sunshine, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC. Has 7 years experience.

I'd come running to help if I were on that floor and someone was taking care of a heavy patient whether they asked for it or not.

Why? Because I know the feeling of having a heavy patient and it was just me assigned to her. I think it was a test and my instructor wanted to see what I would do. Of course I was asking for help from another student and evetually we had to call a CNA in because I just when it came to am care/sheet change I'd get stuck and couldn't do it myself.

She wasn't a mechanical lift. Nor did her chart or assignment sheet for the CNA state that she was a two assist. The patient was over 300 pounds.

I'm sorry you have to go through this. The sad thing is if something happened to you or the patient YOU would be screwed for not transferring properly. It is sad that everyone is short staffed, sometimes residents have to wait.

ctmed

Specializes in PACU, LTC, Med-Surg, Telemetry, Psych. Has 4 years experience.

I'm sorry you have to go through this. The sad thing is if something happened to you or the patient YOU would be screwed for not transferring properly. It is sad that everyone is short staffed, sometimes residents have to wait.

Agreed. ^^THIS^^

If I am incapable of lifting someone or transfering someone safely, that patient stays where they are at until I have the help I need to do it. Non-teamwork work environments be darned. However, eventually, help does appear if you are insistant. Patient will have to wait. Bottom line, no comprimises.

Most of these places DO NOT give CNAs give you insurance if you mess yourself up anyways. Plus, I doubt any sane DON is going to fire any CNA for asking for help due to safety. (But then again, I have met some pretty insane DONs)

nursemike, ASN, RN

Specializes in Rodeo Nursing (Neuro). Has 12 years experience.

In my previous job, I spent a lot of my time getting people from bed to wheelchair, bed to cart, bed to chair, and vice versa. The heaviest transfer I ever did alone was 550 lbs. That's roughly comparable to the ratio of caregiver-to-patient mass as the 90-some pound physical therapist to me, when she taught me how to do it. (I did assess the pt, who only needed modest stabilization--he bore his own weight, and we were only pivoting to a bedside commode.)

With pts

My point is not that the OP is wrong. Honestly, for a total lift, if two are required, 4 is probably better. You can transfer a lot more gently if you aren't straining. A 200lb pt divided by 2 is 100lbs. each. I'm a guy, and not small. I used to carry 80lbs up a ladder, on my shoulder. I can lift 100 lbs. But often, in the positions we have to work, it isn't an easy lift. If four of us lift 50lbs each, we can actually lift, rather than slide, and nobody has to strain. I'll also get help to put a 100lb pt on a bedpan, so I can turn them while someone else places the pan. (100 lb pts are usually females, so I take the modest side.)

But I also see the other side of the picture. Aide needs to bathe a 250lb patient, so the nurse has to help, or 2 aides work together. Some are smart enough to get help for the part they need help with, some expect you there the whole time, to get it done more quickly. That can be okay, but there are plenty of times I don't have time to help was the front of a supine patient or hang out during oral care. Nor do I really have time to put people on and off bedpans, by myself, because the aides are busy doing baths together. Some jobs that are easier with two can be done by one, and others actually require two (or more).

It isn't fair to accuse the OP of things I've seen with the aides I work with, and truth be told, the aides I work with are generally very good. But there are times when even the best of them aren't seeing the whole picture. I have overheard aides responding to the clerk over a call light, "Let the nurse do some work, for a change." Do I hurry when they need assistance? Well, crap, yes I do, because you can't put the patients at risk. But if--and I emphasize, if, the OP takes that disrespectful attitude toward nurses, I, for one, would find it hard to feel sympathetic, because I do use my brain, quite a lot.

Edited by nursemike
having trouble spelling four

PostOpPrincess, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, MICU, CVICU, SICU, ER, Trauma, NICU. Has 19 years experience.

Nurses, get off your ***** and help her.

ktwlpn, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Homecare, Hospice.

Sheesh-doesn't your facility have a lifting policy and equipment on the unit? I have worked with many staff members whom would rather lift a way- too- heavy- patient then bother to go get the proper equipment and staff. As for nursing staff that don't want to "touch" a patient-I see this crap in LTC all of the time. BUT Please don't interrupt me during my med pass from hell to help you because you don't want to work WITH your partner because she is not in your clique. My team is almost always willing to lend a hand and often do so-sadly it is usually not right where all of the cna's can see so some just assume we don't. And no matter how much we do it's never enough for some. And they also assume that because we may be sitting at the desk we aren't working. Day shift is responsible for the monthly recaps,restorative notes,the docs all do their rounds on days and we write a big comprehensive note each visit and we do all of the annual,quarterly and significant change assessments(keyed to the MDS) We have to follow up on the previous 2 shifts and take care of anything that they felt could wait-we have to order and put away all supplies,we follow up with meds (tracking them down if missing) and follow up with incident reports.We often eat on the run or sneak in and and of the med room for lunch.And after busting our butts I'll hear a cna say something like "Oh yeah when the state comes they'll all be on the floor" My ADON and my DON both back us up-we CAN do the cna's job but they can't do ours. The facility is NOT going to pay me over time because I could not manage my time and get my stuff done because I was jumping up and down all day lifting,toileting,etc.

GucciRN22

Specializes in Med/Surg, Oncology, Tele, ICU.

that this is even a problem is stupid! if i don't expect myself to do a task that requires 2+ people, then why on earth would i expect someone else to do it?!? i guess some people don't think before designating tasks....