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PDN shot and killed

Posted

Specializes in Peds(PICU, NICU float), PDN, ICU.

I posted an article about a nurse that was killed on the job. Its under nursing news. Can't post link with my phone.

I thought a good topic would be on safety. Many of us have been in dangerous situations at work or work in dangerous areas. What do you do to be safe? I don't think new nurses or nurses new to our area of the nursing world realize the dangers of our job. I thought this would be a good topic for them to read before considering this job as well as a good topic to share tips for us more experienced nurses.

I have long recognized the dangers of PDN/HH Nursing...I realized a long time ago that this area was not for me. I think that you all are brave souls and respect you all very much. It really can be a dangerous job.

I did see the article that you posted...very sad.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

I have long recognized the dangers of PDN/HH Nursing...I realized a long time ago that this area was not for me. I think that you all are brave souls and respect you all very much. It really can be a dangerous job.

I did see the article that you posted...very sad.

This makes me a tad nervous. I'm starting PDN in Peds HH and now I'm not too sure...

I have long recognized the dangers of PDN/HH Nursing...I realized a long time ago that this area was not for me. I think that you all are brave souls and respect you all very much. It really can be a dangerous job.

To be fair, a nurse was attacked in my area several years ago in the parking garage as she was leaving her hospital job.

There is inherent danger working in the hospital as well as out if it. We ALL need to be concerned with safety, no matter where we work.

I agree that safety is a 24/7 issue for anyone. However, PDN's and HH nurses are particularly vulnerable to problems because they are in a closed and foreign environment with people whom we generally know nothing about. Where I work they are under construction which brings a whole host of other strangers into the mix. Some of them have made me feel extremely uncomfortable and I have learned the hard way to listen when my internal bells go DING! If something goes down, I am done. I am trapped. I have nobody to hear me scream. It is definitely something in my mind. I pay a lot of attention to my body language and I try not to have my back to anyone I don't know. Two things that may have spoke "victim" to my attacker in a previous type of employment. I am always scanning my environment for exits and risks as well.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

My condolences go out to the family.

My questions are whether this person knew her.

Similar situation happened to myself; I knew the person, though, and it was broad daylight, almost 10 in the morning. I was shot seven times at close range and survived.

It's been 6 years and those feelings still happen from time to time; more so when these situations occur.

I did return to home care years later successfully for a brief stint before moving to hospital work, and into other endeavors. :yes:

The person that caused me the most danger I knew; it wasn't a random person in the community; I even had a restraining order against this person.

There is danger; in my experience it was someone that I knew. :blink:

Wow! I am so glad you survived. :yes:

PDN/HH has it's risks, but I was in a government hospital with psych patients and loads of PTSD afflicted souls. I found that much more unpredictable and frightening. Not long ago, there was a shooting in the main lobby.

Personal safety, no matter where we work, shop, or play, should always be a top priority. I won't even park next to a panel van at the grocery store! And I always carry pepper spray, in my hand, not my purse, when I am in a vulnerable place.

RNIBCLC

Specializes in Maternity.

My condolences go out to the family.

My questions are whether this person knew her.

Similar situation happened to myself; I knew the person, though, and it was broad daylight, almost 10 in the morning. I was shot seven times at close range and survived.

It's been 6 years and those feelings still happen from time to time; more so when these situations occur.

I did return to home care years later successfully for a brief stint before moving to hospital work, and into other endeavors. :yes:

The person that caused me the most danger I knew; it wasn't a random person in the community; I even had a restraining order against this person.

There is danger; in my experience it was someone that I knew. :blink:

Wow, I'm glad you survived. The back stories many of us must have on AN has got to be incredible.

Has anyone worked for a home health agency that utilized bodyguards on occasion?

I think that it's justified, especially if the nurse is heading into a sketchy area.

My husband used to get hired to be the bodyguard for nurses having to do this. He told me about how he would escort the nurse to the door of a seedy apartment and wait. Well, all kinds of riff-raff would be eyeballing my husband (6'4" and built like a bear) and they did NOT like that he was there with those nurses. He said that he could only imagine how it was for the nurses going in there on their own.

Those nurses were very vulnerable, between the "ooooooh la la... a nursie" perception these jerks had and the fact that these jerks were expecting the nurse to have drugs... well, those nurses were in a rough spot.

The only reason he got hired, was because the nurses all started to refuse these assignments, because the harassment and fear was so bad.

He hasn't been called for sometime now, but I know nurses haven't stopped having to deal with this crap.

I'm sure it's the money that keeps the agencies from utilizing him, but those nurses expressed nothing but gratitude that he was there.

Edited by Hygiene Queen
I didn't proofread first.

To be fair, a nurse was attacked in my area several years ago in the parking garage as she was leaving her hospital job.

There is inherent danger working in the hospital as well as out if it. We ALL need to be concerned with safety, no matter where we work.

You are right, we all need to be aware of our environment no matter where we work and go. I agree that safety should be everyone's priority. Attacks have happened to nurses walking out of our hospital as well. Things can happen no matter where you are.

I still feel that HH/PDNs have a heightened risk as they are truly alone out there unless their agency utilizes security or allows police escorts.

nekozuki, LPN

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 5 years experience.

I have worked in some rough neighborhoods (especially government housing), and just stick to what I've been taught my whole life from parents who grew up in Brooklyn: Don't make yourself a target. Be alert, look around you, keep your head and shoulders high, project confidence, don't have your hands full, keep your phone/wallet out of sight as you get in and out of your car. If you are perceived as vulnerable, you are a target. I've gotten "sup white b*tch" a couple times, but generally it's just stares and hushed comments.

A few of my fellow nurses carry weapons, and a couple keep a gun in their cars despite company policy. Their stance is "I'd rather be fired than dead."

MiladyMalarkey, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Neuro. Has 2 years experience.

This is an awful story, I feel for the family of this nurse. I myself am not a nurse yet, I am however a probation officer and go into neighborhoods and homes of others on a regular basis. While my current job is not the same, surprisingly I have found that most threats faced while out in the field is not the people we are visiting (in my case convicted offenders, in home healthcare your patients), rather their neighbors, random passersby, family members and even animals. The piece of advice that I can share is situational awareness, always be aware of your surroundings and the people in them. How you carry yourself is also key, body language says a lot to potential predators, in their mind you're are their next target or you're the one they are not going to gamble with because you look like you won't go down without a good fight, a thing most want to avoid. If you get a bad feeling in your gut, always, always listen to it--better safe than sorry. For you nurses out and about in the community, be safe out there.

smartnurse1982

Has 7 years experience.

I have never heard of a private Duty nurse having an escort.

How would that work for an 8 hr shift?

I find that it does not matter the neighborhood,there is always a threat of danger.

Sometimes when i am in "rich" neighborhoods i worry about someone going postal.

We really are not allowed to carry weapons in Nj.

I do not want to risk losing my nursing license over a concealed carry offense.

SeaH20RN, BSN

Specializes in ER, Forensic Nurse, SANE.

I carry Mace/ Pepper spray with me and took a Karate / self-defense course. I do have a Conceled weapons permit but only for person use. I would never carry on the job.

* If your that concerned about the area, talk to your supervisor. Maybe 2 nurses and make a joint visit or just call the police, they will send one out and wait by the door (inside or out) while you make your visit. The police are very understanding and so is the pt. Remember the pt does want you to come back agin. Be safe!

smartnurse1982

Has 7 years experience.

I carry Mace/ Pepper spray with me and took a Karate / self-defense course. I do have a Conceled weapons permit but only for person use. I would never carry on the job.

* If your that concerned about the area, talk to your supervisor. Maybe 2 nurses and make a joint visit or just call the police, they will send one out and wait by the door (inside or out) while you make your visit. The police are very understanding and so is the pt. Remember the pt does want you to come back agin. Be safe!

Are you doing visits or shift work?

I am doing shift work in the home(anything from 6 to 16 hrs) and i doubt we would get a police escort. Most of us on this board are doing shift work.

I have a gun carry permit, but it's against company policy take it a patient's home during my 12 hr shift. I still carry it inside. I have a family that expects me to come home to them. I would never use it unless I was truly in a life threatening situation.

When I was looking for my first job, there was a listing for a sample collection/vital collection nurse for patients that were in out-patient mandated drug rehabilitation programs. The duties included periodic travel to the home of the addict to collect blood and urine specimens (and vitals), without escort. The salary listed was fantastic, but there was no way I would consider a job that required me to go into a drug addicts home to collect samples. Not only could I see the potential for violence and resistance from the patient, but nearly all of those mandated by the court into the program associated with other addicts and dealers.

Definitely not a situation for me. :no:

I do a 2hr early AM visit from 0400-0600 in a "not so great" neighborhood full of crack homes in a small lil ally. My fiancé worries about my safety every morning I walk out of my house. It just doesn't sit well with him to have me out there this early alone as a women. After reading this article, my chest is pounding. ..seems like I really need to do something. One morning, as I was parking a man stood in a corner watching me. I let it go thinking it was a concerned neighbor. 2nd time it happened, I brushef it off. I don't wanna wait for 3rd time...thanks for sharing!