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Other Side of Coin---Less than Humble New Grads

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We hear a lot about 'eating our young', something which I personally experienced myself, btw, but what about the other side of the coin? How do we handle 'know it all' new grads who overstep their bounds? I've also run into this.

What about the new grad who is so full of her/him self, and who shows a lack of understanding and/or respect for the established members of the unit? Any thoughts???

It won't take long for them to fall flat on their faces. As long as it doesn't compromise pt care, I'd let them do it. Hopefully they'll learn quickly enough that they really don't know as much as they think.

UM Review RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Utilization Management.

Eeek. This is the preceptor's nightmare.

They're overconfident. It can be a harrowing experience to precept this type of individual because they truly cannot conceive that they can make an error and they have no insight as to the cost it can exact in terms of the patient's life or the morale of the unit.

Usually, I'll have to take them down a peg by pointing out their need to respect their coworkers and be a team player. I'll remind them that all of us have different learning curves and education gaps, so while I might know a whole lot about "X," I might not know doodly about "Y." At some point, if they have half a brain, they'll realize that their attitude is important to the unity and the morale of the unit.

Some people are just born with a superiority complex. It's worse if they're technically good at nursing. In addition to their lack of insight about how easily they can burn themselves out being the Be-All and End-All to Nursing, it's annoying to work with these people. The disrespect for their coworkers is evident with the eye-rolling, the snickers, the head-shaking, the condescending tone when they're asked a question.

So I just don't help them as much. I have my ducks in a row, and I won't let them bully me by asking questions designed to "prove" my stupidity and show off their knowledge.

pricklypear

Specializes in Telemetry, ICU, Resource Pool, Dialysis. Has 11 years experience.

I wonder if part of the problem sometimes is the "by the book" attitude that you get crammed down your throat in school. Clinical experience can be so limited, especially with instructors breathing down everybody's neck, that some new grads don't really have a clue how some things are REALLY taken care of.

I know part of it is an attitude problem to begin with, but there seems to be this period of adjustment where we have to give up the idealistic notions taught in school and realize that things can't always be "by the book"

I've been lucky enough not to have too many experiences with these kinds of people. I have one funny story: Its really gross, though...

Had a patient with almost continuous watery diarrhea. Finally, we just took the suction tubing and left it in the bed to keep the worst of the mess from overflowing onto the floor in between changing her every 10 minutes or so. Our new grad was appalled at this. "it's humiliating to the client!!" (she was unresponsive) "What about skin integrity??" Almost to the point of writing up an incident report. This is the same guy who was taking care of a patient (as a tech) in ER who was in with chest pain. She had to go to the bathroom. So he is seen wheeling her, in the bed, down the hall to the bathroom. "What are you doing????" "Taking her to the bathroom" "Why in the bed???" "She's on bedrest, she has chest pain" I'm not kidding. He had to move the commode out of the way to get the bed out of the room. Nobody asked him what he planned to do once he got her to the bathroom.

I don't know which is worse, the eye-rolling or the bored sigh. Heaven forfend you try to point something out to them, because they are the first ones to scream, "Nurses eat their young!"

UM Review RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Utilization Management.

This is the same guy who was taking care of a patient (as a tech) in ER who was in with chest pain. She had to go to the bathroom. So he is seen wheeling her, in the bed, down the hall to the bathroom. "What are you doing????" "Taking her to the bathroom" "Why in the bed???" "She's on bedrest, she has chest pain"

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

meownsmile, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho.

Given enough rope!!! They usually take care of themselves fairly soon. About the first time they get a new one from a doctor their tune changes. I agree, monitor patient safety and let them hang themselves.

CrunchRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health. Has 25 years experience.

Hee hee - I love the one with the guy pushing the whole bed to the bathroom. That is very funny!

GrnHonu99, RN

Specializes in Neuro, Critical Care.

Im a nursing student and just want to say...no know it all here! Im scared to death for my first clincals.....coming up in 3 weeks! I am so afraid I will come off looking like an idiot...Im very book smart, but I have never been to clinicals and I hope that im hands on smart too...things seem to go well in skills lab but, dummies really can't give you feedback...sigh...flipping back to the other side of the coin, I really hope that my clincal instructor doesnt "eat me"...there is only 1 hospital in the area in which I live that I know that prob would happen...with my luck i'll get assigned to that hospital...

just a q. for you guys..if you were in the hospital would you let a student nurse in clinicals take you on as a pt or would you refuse?

Brotherbob, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

would you let a student nurse in clinicals take you on as a pt?

Sure, the students with bad attitude are a minority. Most provide great care and are not in a hurry like regular staff.

baby&mommynurse

Specializes in OB. Has 10 years experience.

I'm an LVN and sometimes it's tough having these young know it all new grad RNs run around with their pompous attitudes and act like they know more than I do even though I'm more experienced and older. I can just imagine what it's like for our veteran RNs. I'm with cyberkat and meownsmile... I just let them sink or swim... of course, without compromising the patient's health and care. A lot of the times, if they are willing to listen, I'll teach them a better way of doing things or remind them of things they may have forgotten, in a subtle way so that they don't take offense. Such as saying, "How about doing it this way to save time?" or "There's the doctor, don't forget to check your orders." Eventually, these new grads start to realize they don't know everything and start respecting the experience nurses who have saved their butts!

pricklypear

Specializes in Telemetry, ICU, Resource Pool, Dialysis. Has 11 years experience.

Im a nursing student and just want to say...no know it all here! Im scared to death for my first clincals.....coming up in 3 weeks! I am so afraid I will come off looking like an idiot...Im very book smart, but I have never been to clinicals and I hope that im hands on smart too...things seem to go well in skills lab but, dummies really can't give you feedback...sigh...flipping back to the other side of the coin, I really hope that my clincal instructor doesnt "eat me"...there is only 1 hospital in the area in which I live that I know that prob would happen...with my luck i'll get assigned to that hospital...

just a q. for you guys..if you were in the hospital would you let a student nurse in clinicals take you on as a pt or would you refuse?

It's the grads (and students) who come into it knowing they don't know everything and are willing to learn that we love to have around. You'll do fine!:)

As a nursing student who has suffered one humiliation after another I can't understand how anyone could come out of nursing school overconfident (or even all that confident at all) -- they would have to be totally dense and insensitive. I have seen these kinds of nurses and it is pretty frightening -- why are they doing this? I can't imagine myself feeling sure of anything for at least a year, probably longer, maybe never given how easy it can be to screw up.

leopold---You'll do fine, I'm sure. I was pretty intimidated by nursing school myself, and I'm fine now. Just keep asking questions of friendly nurses, and steer clear of the mean ones...:)

I had one new grad that was acting very aggressively to myself and others. Since I'm the type that doesn't like confrontations, I wrote her a note, telling her not to try and take charge of decisions, not to push my shoulder when she talked to me, not to make belittling comments to me, etc. I guess she was furious at getting my note and showed it to everyone she could grab, most of whom were also annoyed with her but not saying anything.

My manager ended up mediating a meeting with us, with this new nurse who came on so strong turning in a bowl of jelly and crying how I was the "one nurse who was so good to her" and other maudlin BS. It was a very interesting experience. That woman really toned down her behaviour after that, and I hear she just got a job in a doctor's office, since she wasn't able to obtain an FTE at our hospital.

lisamc1RN, LPN

Specializes in LTC/Behavioral/ Hospice. Has 4 years experience.

I go to school with one student who seems kind of cocky. She doesn't want to listen to instructions and sometimes ignores our instructor or rolls her eyes at her. The rest of us are really excited about learning and I think we realize that the real learning won't happen until we are on the job! There is just too much to know and we can't possibly learn it all in such a short time! We are just in the introductory phase! :chuckle I absolutely love working with the nurses who are so patient with us and willing to answer our questions. I can understand how frustrating it would be to work with a newbie who thinks they know it all already! YIKES!

lil' girl, LPN

Specializes in LTC. Has 4 years experience.

Well I too am a student. Know it all......NOT. Self assured maybe but not to the point that I would "question" a seasoned nurse. If I didn't agree w/something I would look it up or ask someone else w/out pointing out who I disagreed with. And I am sure there has been another thread about the pushy floor nurses. I find that if you give respect you usually get it in return.

I currently work w/ an LPN who is an RN-to-be. She typically tells her patients that she is one of the best nurses on our unit and that the rest of us are intimidated by her and her knowledge and skill! Burns my butt every time I hear this!:angryfire

Now if she was even a good nurse I wouldn't necessarily have a problem with any of it. But she is one of those nurses we just really dread following because there are so many loose ends! I wish there was an emoticon pulling their hair out! LOLOLOLOLOL

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