Nursing diagnosis "altered energy field"

Posted
by paphgrl paphgrl Member

You are reading page 24 of Nursing diagnosis "altered energy field". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Retired R.N.

Retired R.N.

260 Posts

Re: Nursing diagnosis "altered energy field"

Can anyone explain to me -- in plain English -- just what is meant by the term "altered energy field?" What -- exactly -- is this "energy field" that we have been discussing? How can one tell if it is altered?

I have searched, Googled, and looked around other sources for a definition of this term, but haven't found anything that seems pertinent. I know a fair amount about magnetic fields around current-carrying wires, uni-directional and reversible motors, surge protectors and processes like the way an arc welder being fired up across the street can interfere with getting a reliable EKG reading or cause commotion to an automatic teller machine that is not properly shielded. I understand about de-gaussing old TV sets and computer monitors, and a microwave oven is pretty straight-forward technology.

However, is this the kind of energy field we have been talking about that apparently surrounds people? And, if one finds a diagnosis of an altered energy field on a patient's chart, exactly what kind of nursing intervention is called for?

The NANDA website is no help at all, and seems to be nothing more than a statement of why they think their bureaucracy needs to exist and why nurses should buy their book.

With all the discussion we've had, there have been occasional references to the placebo effect, but why has nothing been said about hypnosis, whether self-induced or guided by another person?

Re: Nursing diagnosis "altered energy field"

Can anyone explain to me -- in plain English -- just what is meant by the term "altered energy field?" What -- exactly -- is this "energy field" that we have been discussing? How can one tell if it is altered?

I have searched, Googled, and looked around other sources for a definition of this term, but haven't found anything that seems pertinent. I know a fair amount about magnetic fields around current-carrying wires, uni-directional and reversible motors, surge protectors and processes like the way an arc welder being fired up across the street can interfere with getting a reliable EKG reading or cause commotion to an automatic teller machine that is not properly shielded. I understand about de-gaussing old TV sets and computer monitors, and a microwave oven is pretty straight-forward technology.

However, is this the kind of energy field we have been talking about that apparently surrounds people? And, if one finds a diagnosis of an altered energy field on a patient's chart, exactly what kind of nursing intervention is called for?

The NANDA website is no help at all, and seems to be nothing more than a statement of why they think their bureaucracy needs to exist and why nurses should buy their book.

With all the discussion we've had, there have been occasional references to the placebo effect, but why has nothing been said about hypnosis, whether self-induced or guided by another person?

Practitioners of TT believe that there is an energy field that surrounds the human body. It apparently extends several inches. When the body suffers a physical disturbance, such as pain, the flow of this energy field is interrupted, hence the altered energy field. The purpose of of the nursing intervention is to restore the balance or eveness of the flow.

Hope this explains it for you.

Grannynurse

SFCardiacRN

SFCardiacRN

762 Posts

I realize I am more widely read then most.

This is what I mean by smug, not your educational background. I do not see posters saying they don't have time to meet emotional needs, they do not have time to assess energy fields or re-align chakras. And religious crisis is best left to the professionals. Debating the physical manifestations of God's(Allah, Satan, Shiva, the Great Pumpkin, Whoever) anger is not nursing.
bookwormom

bookwormom

358 Posts

[ However, is this the kind of energy field we have been talking about that apparently surrounds people? And, if one finds a diagnosis of an altered energy field on a patient's chart, exactly what kind of nursing intervention is called for?

My understanding is that some nurses believe that the nurse can, by personal force of will or intent (maybe not the best choice of words) use the nurse's own energy to change the energy of another. It's more than a skill or technique , and involves using one's whole self as part of the healing process.

The most recent edition of Beginnings, a publication of the American Holistic Nurses Association, features energy healing, and includes several modalities: TT, Healing Touch, Reiki, etc. I believe that if one has an accepting attitude, these are actual techniques that can be learned and incorporated into care. I think some practitioners perform these techniques as part of an independent practice.

This is what I mean by smug, not your educational background. I do not see posters saying they don't have time to meet emotional needs, they do not have time to assess energy fields or re-align chakras. And religious crisis is best left to the professionals. Debating the physical manifestations of God's(Allah, Satan, Shiva, the Great Pumpkin, Whoever) anger is not nursing.

Are you trying to provoke an argument? Smugness is your statement. I am more well read then the average individual and always have been. And I will not apologize for being well read. No one is asking every nurse to do TT. All we have asked is for the same respect that those non-believers appear to believe their beliefs and they are entitled to. You are correct anger is not part of nursing but dealing with an angry patient appropriately certainly is.

Grannynurse:balloons:

SFCardiacRN

SFCardiacRN

762 Posts

I think these techniques benefit the ego of the practitioner more than the patient. What if TT actually disrupts the energy field even more? What if these techniques cause progression of disease? What if alternative therapies cause the patient to delay or forgo proven treatment? I've seen it with a cancer patient and it was not pretty!

Some nurses appear to believe that practitioners of alternative therapy encourage patients to forego conventional treatment. Apparently they have not investigated the purpose of such treatments and are willing to accept anything detractors say. I believe they have gotten their facts mixed up with laetrile practitioners.

Grannynurse:balloons:

MJH

MJH

4 Posts

I don't suppport this NANDA DX. I think it's confusing, if a nurse looks at this on chart, it could be interpreted many ways. I think it needs to be more scientific and evidence based. What do you people think in responce to me??

zenman

2 Articles; 2,806 Posts

Are you trying to provoke an argument? Smugness is your statement. I am more well read then the average individual and always have been. And I will not apologize for being well read. No one is asking every nurse to do TT. All we have asked is for the same respect that those non-believers appear to believe their beliefs and they are entitled to. You are correct anger is not part of nursing but dealing with an angry patient appropriately certainly is.

Grannynurse:balloons:

Maybe SFCardiacRN is interpreting your experience and knowledge as "smugness." You might say that I'm also "well read." I remember vividly my first day going to a public library at 6 yrs of age and checking out 25 books. It is still a normal practice for me to purchase at least $500 worth of books per month. Does this make me smarter than the average person? Probably, but certainly not richer!

I know that is is surprising to some here that I have been accused of being direct. As I explained to one person, do you want long term therapy of do you want quick results. If you want cuddling go elsewhere; if you want quick results, I'll tell you what I think based on my years of knowledge and experience. Plus when you get older, you tend to be short-tempered, especially when you see posts such as, "who do I report a HIPPA violation to" (HIPPA perhaps?) and one that said something to the effect of 'who is over nurses" (It's on your license ..BON).

Basically, I see no smugness in your answers; just responses based on your knowledge and experience.

leslie :-D

11,191 Posts

i don't see any smugness either- i didn't get defensive reading granny's replies.

being well-read and experienced is NOT synonymous with intelligence.

let's not forget that.

peace,

leslie

danu3

danu3

621 Posts

To get back to sort of the original topic of this thread, let's do a simple exercise. Let's look at the details of the nursing diagnoses for Alter Energy Filed and Spiritual Distress.

The following is a link to the nursing diagnosis from a previous poster way back when:

http://www.fadavis.com/resources/New%20and%20Revised%20Nursing%20DiagnosesApproved_at_the_2005-2006_NANDA.pdf

I am reposting the link just for our convience (just click) and also just to make sure we are all looking at the same version (this may not be the most current one).

The simple exercise involve two similar scenerio and basically state your thoughts on these given these two scenerio. Let's also assume there is such a thing as energy field and that TT is effective. The question here is how well or not well the Alter Energy Field is written.

First scenerio is that toward the end of the shift, nurse TT diagnosed his/her patient with Alter Energy Field but did not have time to do any intervention. Now the next shift nurse, say nurse NT came onto the shift and saw this diagnosis. Furthermore, Nurse NT has no training in TT and not only that, Nurse NT do not believe there is such a thing as "energy field". What should s/he do?

Second scenerio is somewhat similar. Again it is toward the end of the shift. Nurse S diagnosed his/her patient with Spiritual Distress but did not have time to do any intervention. Now the next shift nurse, say nurse A came on and saw this diagnosis. Furthermore, Nurse A is an atheist. What should s/he do?

A related question - What are the similarities and differences between these two diagnosis if any?

danu3

danu3

621 Posts

i don't see any smugness either- i didn't get defensive reading granny's replies.

being well-read and experienced is NOT synonymous with intelligence.

let's not forget that.

peace,

leslie

Nor is it synoymous with wisdom, insights, understanding, compassion, kindness, ... etc.

A related question is how does being well read and having lots of experience shape that person? Does it make the person become full of him/herself and s/he starts to look down on other people? Or does it make the person humble because s/he realize how much one does not know?

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.