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Nurses eat their young during report???

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by ammanke64 ammanke64 (New) New

HELP!!!! This is my first nursing job on a med/surg floor. I have a meeting with my manager because other nurses are saying I don't know my patients and suspect I'm not doing my assessments. The real problem is that I have been put down so many times during report that I now get ridiculous anxiety and my mind goes blank. I really feel like my only option is to find a new job because now I'm on the radar. I work night shift , and the info needed for night shift is completely diff than what days needs to know. Plus they ask tons of questions about things that should be easy to see during assessment (should be easy to answer but my mind goes blank from nerves)

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

Only you can control your reactions to other people- the anxiety and having your mind go blank. Do you have a brain sheet where you write down the most important bits and pieces about your patients? A brain sheet can help you be organized when giving report rather than just relying on memory or trying to look through the chart. If you do a search here on AN, you will find examples of brain sheets.

Only you can decide whether leaving your current job is best for you. You don't say how long you've been a nurse, but it does take time to feel competent- in my specialty, it's about a year, and I'm sure it's similar in others.

Edited by Rose_Queen

poppycat, ADN, BSN

Specializes in pediatrics; PICU; NICU. Has 43 years experience.

This is not a case of NETY! It is about your reaction.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

I always found that the 'best' report was one that provided me with a sufficient heads-up ... highlighting priorities and things that I would need to be addressing right away. It's a great way to start the day when the off-going nurse gives me that sort of boost. It becomes something I wanted to pass on to my relief nurse also.

So, in addition to providing all that 'data' from your brain sheet... try to anticipate things from the Day Shift perspective. Making that extra effort, even if it's just having that new IV bag hanging up ready for that 7:30AM change or ensuring that there is fresh linen on hand to make the bed when the patient gets OOB for AM care. Play it forward.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Plus they ask tons of questions about things that should be easy to see during assessment (should be easy to answer but my mind goes blank from nerves)

Never ever EVER assume that something will be easy to see--or even be seen period--during assessment. Look at it from the liability standpoint: something happens to the patient because of one of these "easy" things and the oncoming nurse will point at you and say, "she/he never told me about it." Then they're going to wonder what else YOU might have missed in your assessments.

If there's an abnormality or something that deserved to be noted, report it even if you think it's blatantly obvious or too insignificant. This is called CYA or covering your ass.

If your memory goes blank during report d/t nerves or whatever, get a brain. That is, a brain sheet. You can find a few here at AN if you search around, or develop your own. On your brain, write down whatever you need to keep track of and whatever you think should be reported to the next shift.

And give yourself time. Your reporting will get better once you start keeping track of what you need to report, once you master your nerves, and once you learn what is and isn't important to convey as well as the unit's particular report style. For example, one unit I work on always wants to know X, Y and Z even if any/all of these are normal. Another unit wants me to report by exception--that is, only pass along the abnormal info or problems.

Edited by Meriwhen

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Also, while I haven't witnessed what actually has been going on during these reports, I'm not quite sure it's in the Nurses Eating Their Young category. After all, if you are failing to pass along key information for whatever reason (e.g., you forgot, you think it's obvious, etc.), it's understandable if they are critical of your report and your assessment skills. They can and SHOULD be questioning you to obtain that info--I know I would. And until you can show them that your reporting skills are improving, they are going to keep questioning you because of your past track record. Try not to take it personally...easier said than done, I know.

Constructive criticism (e.g., you're told you forgot to report something or that you need to be more detail-oriented) is NOT Nurses Eating Their Young. It's constructive criticism, and like it or not, we all get to hear it throughout our careers.

Now if they are being derogatory or personally attacking you (e.g., you hear things like "how could you be so stupid?"), then that's not cool and should be reported to your manager.

Edited by Meriwhen

Be assertive and stand up for yourself. People shouldn't put you down. If they are being harsh and rude to you, be firm. Don't talk back but stand up.

joyouter

Specializes in ICU, APHERESIS, IV THERAPY, ONCOLOGY, BC. Has 30 years experience.

HELP!!!! This is my first nursing job on a med/surg floor. I have a meeting with my manager because other nurses are saying I don't know my patients and suspect I'm not doing my assessments. The real problem is that I have been put down so many times during report that I now get ridiculous anxiety and my mind goes blank. I really feel like my only option is to find a new job because now I'm on the radar. I work night shift , and the info needed for night shift is completely diff than what days needs to know. Plus they ask tons of questions about things that should be easy to see during assessment (should be easy to answer but my mind goes blank from nerves)

First of all think about your actions at work. Are you organised, do you think systematically when assessing patients and their needs.

Developing a system to organise patient name, diagnosis, treatments, allergies ( espec.) and ongoing events. such as ivt. when due etc. I know at report for night nurse shifts, day shift personnel also come with various approaches to work. Some will be genuinely interested and appreciative of your assessment skills which is very helpful to the next shift. Some will resent coming to work at all and their anger or put down will be reflected in how they address you or other colleagues with whom they feel free to harass.

Don't let this get to you, remember their intimidating behavior is less than professional. You are new and struggling to learn the ropes. Only you can take responsibility and not allow yourself to be intimidated. If they are getting to you that strongly I would address it with your HN, or simply put it simply and state you are learning how to do a good job and you appreciate positive help from the team. If this does not work then the HN needs to be involved in assessing staff attitudes to co workers.

remember; 1. Organise , use a brain sheet to help you .2. Be concise and in-depth in your assessments and reports. I know it is difficult but that is how you will learn and develop your skills.

Good luck and be strong.

New nurse here too. I just go,from top to bottom. I make sure I know the dx and the main md and the date of the iv and of what the on going plan is. Some nurses are more picky than others. But you have to let that roll off your back and have your own plan. Another way to combat this is bedside report. So that you can go over the highlights and point out stuff to the on going nurse. And know when the last time pain meds where given. And what type.

My last off going shift I had a pt that was off the cuff confused. I did all I could do to not have him fall. I know the on coming nurse looked at his bed like I was a bad nurse because the draw sheet was out of sorts. But she was not there. I was. I did not let her looks bother me. I just stated the facts. And gots the heck out of dodge without look back.

Sounds like you are just nervous and still learning which is totally fine. I truly do think there are some units where experienced nurses are very accepting and helpful to new nurses, and others where they are impatient and expect you to have all the skills down right off the bat. Which isn't right in my opinion. Considering how many workplaces ARE accepting and helpful to new nurses it's ridiculous for the ones that aren't. I say literally cover everything from top to bottom to make sure they don't miss a dang beat. I'm sure you'll get better and better at report. It will take time to develop these skills so I say in the meantime cover your butt, mention everything, and take your time if u need to if that will allow you time to think and recover lost and forgotten tidbits. They seriously can't say you're doing anything wrong if you cover everything. All they can say is your report takes too long, you mention unnecessary info, or something dumb like that and they will just have to get over it while you develop your skills. As long as you're doing what you're supposed to, they can suck up their minor complaints.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

HELP!!!! This is my first nursing job on a med/surg floor. I have a meeting with my manager because other nurses are saying I don't know my patients and suspect I'm not doing my assessments. The real problem is that I have been put down so many times during report that I now get ridiculous anxiety and my mind goes blank. I really feel like my only option is to find a new job because now I'm on the radar. I work night shift , and the info needed for night shift is completely diff than what days needs to know. Plus they ask tons of questions about things that should be easy to see during assessment (should be easy to answer but my mind goes blank from nerves)

Nurses don't eat their young during report or any other time. The fact that you put that in your header tells me a lot about what the real problem is, and I'm thinking it's not them. The only person at fault for your brain going blank is the one whose brain is going blank. A new job isn't going to help you much, because wherever you go, you take that person with you.

Get yourself a decent brain sheet, if you don't already have one. You already know what the day shift is going to want to know. As you go through your shift, write those things down on your brain sheet. As you give report, refer to your brain sheet as much as you need to.

I use the attached sheet to give and take report on Med Surg. I write the info down in pencil when I take report and make changes as needed during the day if IV site change, Foley is removed, etc. I'm often able to use the same sheet 3 days in a row, and it really helps me give a clear, concise report of what oncoming nurse needs to know to do their job. I feel your pain though; it was bad before I started using this. Forgive the formatting.

Report Sheet.docx