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nurse, per diem, needs a second job!¡ Really?

LPN/LVN   (4,533 Views | 14 Replies)

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New lpn grad (91avge. On my transcript, not easy), first job hired as per diem 2 weeks in. (I know they do per diem to keep from giving benefits, I don't need them I'm ok with that rather more pay for now)

They don't pay overtime, no problem. FYI.. Live in NY

But my issue is my schedule. It is maybe two days here, no days here. I keep calling they throw me a day here. Then when I work they just switch my assignment no heads up, I find out by someone asking me why I'm on this floor. I do a good job and I'm competent. I just feel like I'm a nurse being treated like less than. I just feel I deserve more respect. The pay is great just don't get any hours to enjoy it.

I was sch. for Monday, Dec. 1st. to work 7-3. Then I get a call Sunday night saying it was a mistake. But can I work 3-11. I said I was busy (professional tone of course) because I felt like I was being jerked around and not respected. This is now December so I ask for my sch for the month figure they now have the chance to add me in(I came in the middle of Nov. so I waited for new month) they didn't call me back. It seems they want me more "on call" than anything.

I have an interview tomorrow I didn't plan to juggle but I have a mortgage to pay.

Anyone else have this issue. Or have incite?

Edited by yupthischickanurse
typo

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RunBabyRN has 2 years experience and specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

3,677 Posts; 27,102 Profile Views

Welcome to the new grad market. It sucks. No better for RNs.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

8,427 Posts; 76,156 Profile Views

Unfortunately, per diem is "as needed", which could come at any time...as soon as two hours before a scheduled shift.

Some places have set per diem shifts, some do not; sounds like the place you work for operates the same way.

You have a job interview lined up, hopefully all goes well. :up:

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5 Followers; 37,754 Posts; 104,617 Profile Views

Be careful how you deal with these people or they won't give you any work at all. Your post read (to me) like you told her you were not available because you were being jerked around. Don't tell them that. When they pull that stuff with you, just tell them you are not available. But keep in mind what PRN means. Every once in awhile, you have to play the game, just enough so they can't say that you say "no" every time. And keep a record of all of this, because this subject might come up some time and you will have to justify yourself. Good luck with the other job interview.

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 321,233 Profile Views

It seems they want me more "on call" than anything.

This is the essence of PRN/perdiem/casual employment.

PRN nurses are paid more money due to the lack of benefits, the expectation of flexibility, and the understanding that you are guaranteed no hours. A PRN nurse is not guaranteed any hours because this type of employment entails the most minimal commitment to the workplace.

You are expected to be flexible. You should expect some shifts to be canceled. You are expected to work on different units or floors. You are expected to be available when the scheduler calls you. You are expected to deal with last-minute changes. Why? Because you were hired under PRN status. That's why. Management couldn't care less if you have a mortgage and bills.

Schedulers give priority to full-time and part-time employees. If you want to work a certain shift all the time and receive assurance that you will work a predetermined number of hours per week, you will need to obtain full-time employment. PRN jobs are not intended to be a person's sole source of income unless you don't need the money or you have a high-earning spouse.

Good luck to you.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

6,504 Posts; 51,648 Profile Views

For someone that wants hours, I think you're being a little bit of a prima donna. Turning down a shift because you felt disrespected when they cancelled a shift?? You're PRN, right? What you're describing sounds exactly like what PRN is meant to be. If you need regular shifts, you need to change your status. Trust me, there are plenty of folks who might like your PRN position.

FWIW, that is my insight (not incite). Also, no need to quote your GPA anymore - you're a working professional now, not a student. It's irrelevant.

ETA: Wow, I'm just now realizing that you just started in NOVEMBER!! You haven't even given the position a month!

Edited by roser13

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84 Posts; 2,334 Profile Views

Per Diem means just that. You will be utilized when needed.

This has nothing to do with respect or being "jerked" around. You will fill in the staffing holes on an as needed basis.

If you need more time to plan a shift , per diem is not for you.

I made my living for years working on call .. you take the good with the bad.

You can parlay the "good" part.... show up.. prove yourself.. soon the manager and staff will "ask" for you.

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 321,233 Profile Views

You can parlay the "good" part.... show up.. prove yourself.. soon the manager and staff will "ask" for you.

Your point is rather salient. PRN nurses who have demonstrated their dependability and flexibility are often the first to be offered full-time employment with the same company. I personally have been 'promoted' to full-time status at several different workplaces after being hired under PRN status.

Like it or not, PRN employment is the wave of the future in nursing. Facilities want to see what you are all about before extending a full-time offer to a nurse who is unproven. The reliable PRN nurse with good interpersonal skills will be offered a full-time job. The unpleasant PRN nurse who complains about last-minute shift cancellations and openly expresses disinterest at being moved around will be autoterminated when the scheduler stops calling.

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ixchel specializes in critical care.

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What you describe is EXACTLY what per diem is. It sounds like this hospital is using your per diem status to cover the holes in their schedule, which is the purpose of "per diem" existing in the first place. They did not hire you per diem to avoid paying you benefits. They hired you per diem because that's what they needed. They owe you nothing.

I'm sorry to be so crass but it drives me nuts when a person accepts something saying, "I know they said this but I just know what they REALLY meant was....." No. There was no hidden "we'll really give you all kinds of hours" meaning behind their job offer.

Now, if you'd come on here saying you're per diem but you work over time every week, then yes, "per diem" is their way of saying, "NO BENEFITS FOR YOU!!!"

Instead you're feeling entitled to something that was never offered to you in the first place.

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xoemmylouox has 13 years experience as a ASN, RN.

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This is the joy of being PRN (per diem). You only work when they feel they need you. Hours are not reliable. I suggest finding another job to provide you the hours you need. Agency work might be more of what you are looking for. Again you will only work when they need you, but they typically have more open spots that need to be filled. Good luck.

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180 Posts; 4,098 Profile Views

Thanks all. When I was hired I was told there is a shortage in the facility by the employer. So I expected to be more in demand. By a staff member I was told there is I high turnaround there. I'm still excited to work as a nurse and will keep searching.

Oh and FYI I did 7 days orientation which I don't get paid for until I get 5 full paid days completed. I have only done two working days. My eyebrow is up with that too.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

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Where I live, what you are hired as is called "casual". We exist to cover sick calls, education days, and vacations.

The only way to survive is just what the other have told you, be available for everything and anything. Expect to be cancelled up to two hours before shift start.

If you have definite shifts that you cannot work, you just tell the staffing office you are not available for those dates or those shifts.

There were many times I only had two days pay in a pay period, due to my family responsibilities. Other times I worked ten shifts and turned down OT.

We are hired to cover a "service", so surgery covers 8 different units, and "medicine" covers 10. You don't know where you are working until you arrive on site. This is the norm.

Now, not getting paid for orientation? That's illegal in my province. You worked, you get paid. What if you were injured on those shifts would WCB even cover you?

And as someone pointed out, employers don't care about your grades, only if you passed the national exam on the first try. Only one employer even asked me that. The rest just want to know when and where you went to school.

When the economy is rough, there is always a shortage of hours for casuals. The part timers need the extra hours if their spouse is laid off, Christmas is coming....

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