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Nurse as a Patient?

Nurses   (2,632 Views 38 Comments)
by beekindRN beekindRN, ASN, RN (Member)

beekindRN is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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You are reading page 3 of Nurse as a Patient?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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On a few occasions I have had the pleasure of taking care of other nurses from my facility.  Most are appreciative but there are a few which appear a bit too keen with the dilauded. Makes you wonder...We had one person who was a horrible patient.  He has since passed, he was a sick person, but he was the worst patient I have had.

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It sounds like you acted professional given the situation. I agree that she does indeed sound like a difficult patient. But maybe everyone could take a moment and ask the question, why... Instead of assuming she has a psychiatric illness maybe you could address the patient holistically. No one has the right to speculate about someone's mental health on just a soundbite of information. You stated she is a very kind person (outside of being a patient), the way she interacts with you and colleagues on a daily basis would be more telling of her mental health than when she is extremely sick. For your coworker who was fired, it is possible that they did indeed make mistakes or has consistently made mistakes in the past. Also, it is possible the patient has a history of nurses/doctors/etc making medical errors that negatively impacted her health or a loved ones. People and patients are a culmination of experiences that doesn't always make their behavior right but it is important to address why someone is acting a certain way.  I can understand that it would be difficult to have a patient telling you how to do your job but I think there is much more to this story than your side. I do believe in the saying: your side, their side and the truth. 

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beekindRN is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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6 hours ago, Forest2 said:

OMG, she is super anxious and to curb that she controls.  I wonder if her physician knows what she is like, if so, then he/she should recommend she perform her own IV's in her own home.

You better keep your own notes, not that I would tell her but I honestly would like to see the look on her face when she is told notes are being taken on her too!  I wonder if she rides the people she has personal relationships with like this.  Can you imagine living with her?

She definitely has some psychiatric issues of some kind.

I told her 🙂 When she was being particularly manipulative, I told her I was going to document all care given and conversations had appropriately, and that my goal is to provide good care. She was not pleased.

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beekindRN is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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2 hours ago, prmenrs said:

Scared and angry. And taking it out on you, and everybody else. Suggest a Team conference and team approach. Charge nurse and/or supervisor should stop in periodically just to chat. Head off the complaints @ the pass. 

I provided a non biased report, but explained the issues and encouraged oncoming nurses to glance at some notes entered about her behavior. My shift brought aboard a team conference with management and even HR! I heard she's been a bit better since then.

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My question is: Is she normally as particular with HER patients as she was regarding herself? In my experience the nurses who micromanage and over-criticize are the most insecure individuals and if they don't get others fired they can drive truly good nurses away if management allows it.

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Crash_Cart has 11 years experience and specializes in ER OR LTC Code Blue Trauma Dog.

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5 hours ago, beekindRN said:

I provided a non biased report, but explained the issues and encouraged oncoming nurses to glance at some notes entered about her behavior. My shift brought aboard a team conference with management and even HR! I heard she's been a bit better since then.

You're just a really good nurse at the end of the day. Perhaps one day she will see that like I do.  Good work. 🙂

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10 hours ago, VwBee89 said:

It sounds like you acted professional given the situation. I agree that she does indeed sound like a difficult patient. But maybe everyone could take a moment and ask the question, why... Instead of assuming she has a psychiatric illness maybe you could address the patient holistically. No one has the right to speculate about someone's mental health on just a soundbite of information. You stated she is a very kind person (outside of being a patient), the way she interacts with you and colleagues on a daily basis would be more telling of her mental health than when she is extremely sick. For your coworker who was fired, it is possible that they did indeed make mistakes or has consistently made mistakes in the past. Also, it is possible the patient has a history of nurses/doctors/etc making medical errors that negatively impacted her health or a loved ones. People and patients are a culmination of experiences that doesn't always make their behavior right but it is important to address why someone is acting a certain way.  I can understand that it would be difficult to have a patient telling you how to do your job but I think there is much more to this story than your side. I do believe in the saying: your side, their side and the truth. 

 

Yes, hopefully some barriers can be removed so that this patient can benefit from more therapeutic relationships.

Just the same, there are behaviors that *wreak havoc* and those described are the type that qualify regardless of the whys. Normal stressed behaviors do not generally involve actions like sabotage and the like.

Most of the advice has centered around the use of appropriate resources to handle the situation - which is the correct advice.

 

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Sheesh! I usually don't tell nurses I'm a nurse because I don't want to alarm them. And I don't really use the call bell or ask for anything unless they're in the room or it's major, and I try not to bother them especially at change of shift.

Claire is evil personified.

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6 hours ago, fredcate said:

My question is: Is she normally as particular with HER patients as she was regarding herself? In my experience the nurses who micromanage and over-criticize are the most insecure individuals and if they don't get others fired they can drive truly good nurses away if management allows it.

There are some people that make others look bad so they look better.  I find it kind of pitiful.

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Well that sounds awful and stressful to deal with.  I do have a former oncology nurse from another facility who is currently in treatment on my oncology unit.  I’m a new grad, just hitting the 6 month mark myself, and first took care of them on my last week of orientation.  Thankfully they are a great patient, even giving me a few tips at times.  Occasionally I have to check those tips against our policies and report back but they are friendly and encouraging either way.  They are just back again for another round of chemo this week and we chatted about how I’m just starting my chemo classes now.  Can’t manage their chemo yet but I’m learning about it and will in the near future.  

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Nurses and doctors always make the worst PT's. Doctors think they can treat themselves, and Most nurses think their Sh1t dont stink. Its almost as if your back in school during clinicals and someone grading your every move, and you have to do things their way. I think your doing the right thing for the situation. Keeping others in the loop, proper documentation, and keeping a cool head instead of telling her off. Keep in mind she must be bored, as most PT's are, and her activity is to essentially judge you. Sorry you got to deal with her.

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nrsang97 has 12 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro ICU and Med Surg.

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Jeeze when I was induced having my son, I helped the nurse program my IV.  She was new to the unit, but not a new nurse.  I usually don't tell people that I am a nurse, but I inadvertently give it away.

 

She sounds like a nightmare to deal with.  

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