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New job and asking for time off

Nurses   (1,456 Views 29 Comments)
by direw0lf direw0lf, BSN (Member) Member Nurse

direw0lf has <1 years experience as a BSN.

10,853 Profile Views; 1,046 Posts

Hello

i will be changing jobs soon as I am moving to a new state.

i have prior obligations - my brother’s wedding the end of May, and grad school clinical that is mandatory in the summer for 4 days.
Both are in different states than I’m moving to so my brother’s wedding would be 2 days off I’d be flying. 

my question is, what is the best way to go about to ask for these days off when I get hired? Immediately? Wait until after orientation? I hate to have to but as I said these are things I cannot miss, and I am not one to take off work. 

thank you

Edited by direw0lf

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,389 Posts; 13,008 Profile Views

In my experience, it's best to present these dates right from the start as part of the hiring process. Be aware though, I've heard from people that they've been told "okay" early on and then had the time-off approval reneged on when the dates actually arrived.

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headofcurls has 1 years experience.

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I would mention it once an offer is extended. “Thank you so much, now I do have a prior commitment from xx to xx”. It’s usually not a problem at all and if they act crazy, call outN it’ll be fine. 

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,389 Posts; 13,008 Profile Views

1 hour ago, headofcurls said:

I would mention it once an offer is extended. “Thank you so much, now I do have a prior commitment from xx to xx”. It’s usually not a problem at all and if they act crazy, call outN it’ll be fine. 

"Call out and it'll be fine"??? That's assuming a lot of this unknown employer, especially if you ask for a certain day, don't get it, then call out...

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headofcurls has 1 years experience.

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1 hour ago, Jedrnurse said:

"Call out and it'll be fine"??? That's assuming a lot of this unknown employer, especially if you ask for a certain day, don't get it, then call out...

I feel like if you tell your employer in advance and they agree and take it back, I would just call out. 

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Tell, or ask, in advance.  Hopefully they agree, then ask for it in writing. 

 

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

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For people suggesting to call out - just fair warning, I have worked in places where you are "punished" for calling out on a date you specifically asked for PTO/requested off. 

I've always told them during the hiring process and have never had issues.

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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The last interview I had, they asked if I had any vacation plans in the upcoming year. I would actually tell them during the interview if they don't ask. It's kind of a good filter for you to find an employer who values downtime/work-life balance for its staff. 

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6 hours ago, headofcurls said:

I would mention it once an offer is extended. “Thank you so much, now I do have a prior commitment from xx to xx”. It’s usually not a problem at all and if they act crazy, call outN it’ll be fine. 

How would you know that it will be "fine"? It might not be fine at all, especially if they are acting "crazy" about it.

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Pixie.RN has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

7 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,312 Posts; 129,208 Profile Views

Just now, Horseshoe said:

How would you know that it will be "fine"? It might not be fine at all, especially if they are acting "crazy" about it.

Oh, it'll be fine, because you won't ever have to work there again. 😜

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730 Posts; 9,135 Profile Views

Don’t call out at a new job, that’s stupid.  During the probationary period you can be fired on the spot for any reason at all.

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18 minutes ago, DeeAngel said:

Don’t call out at a new job, that’s stupid.  During the probationary period you can be fired on the spot for any reason at all.

This.  Instead, be up front about your request during the hiring process.  

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