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New grad, first week off orientation.. need some encouragement to get through this week :(

Posted

Hey fellow nurses. 
As the title says, I am officially off orientation and will be on my own this week. I don’t work for three more nights, and am already experiencing immense anxiety. 
Side note: I am pregnant and have been struggling with anxiety/depression. Last week my doctor actually wrote me off work because of my panic attacks regarding work. 
I go back this week to my first full week alone. I am trying my best to BATTLE these thoughts (fears of making mistakes, imposter syndrome, low confidence, accidentally hurting a patient or missing something important such as an assessment finding that leads to patient decline, constantly thinking of all the things that can go wrong, etc, etc...), because I can’t NOT work. I can’t give up. I have to do this for my husband and baby on the way and to prove to myself I can. :’(

My charge nurses and other nurses I work with are so great and helpful. I was a CNA on the same floor (except on the opposite shift) and so I haven’t had to deal with bullying or nurses eating their young. My worries are purely centered around my own level of confidence and preparedness and patient safety. 

please, I am just asking for some words of encouragement, some words to know I’m not alone, and that I’ll “be OK” from people who truly have been in my shoes. 

dream'n, BSN, RN

Specializes in UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych. Has 28 years experience.

Sounds like you will be surrounded with helpful, experienced coworkers, so remember you are not alone. They will be there if you are unsure or need a hand. 

It also takes time and experience to build up confidence. Realize that and take a deep breath.

 

4 hours ago, Swirl531 said:

Hey fellow nurses. 
As the title says, I am officially off orientation and will be on my own this week. I don’t work for three more nights, and am already experiencing immense anxiety. 
Side note: I am pregnant and have been struggling with anxiety/depression. Last week my doctor actually wrote me off work because of my panic attacks regarding work. 
I go back this week to my first full week alone. I am trying my best to BATTLE these thoughts (fears of making mistakes, imposter syndrome, low confidence, accidentally hurting a patient or missing something important such as an assessment finding that leads to patient decline, constantly thinking of all the things that can go wrong, etc, etc...), because I can’t NOT work. I can’t give up. I have to do this for my husband and baby on the way and to prove to myself I can. :’(

My charge nurses and other nurses I work with are so great and helpful. I was a CNA on the same floor (except on the opposite shift) and so I haven’t had to deal with bullying or nurses eating their young. My worries are purely centered around my own level of confidence and preparedness and patient safety. 

please, I am just asking for some words of encouragement, some words to know I’m not alone, and that I’ll “be OK” from people who truly have been in my shoes. 

If you weren’t capable and competent, there’s no way you would’ve made it this far. You should lean on the coworkers who are willing to support you and guide you during this time. Even though you’re on your own, show them your compassion and let them be there for you. Show them that you’re eager to learn and want to put your best for forward! You got this and I believe in you, super mom!

NightNerd, MSN, RN

Specializes in CMSRN, tele, palliative, psych. Has 7 years experience.

You got this!! And you called it - many of us have been there before and soon, just like us, you will know it is survivable! It sounds like you've got a great team to work with, so don't worry; even though you'll be "on your own," you won't actually be alone. And don't you dare feel inadequate for asking questions! You will always have more questions no matter how much experience you get; it's part of the field and nothing to feel bad about. You're gonna be okay, mama!

AceOfHearts<3

Specializes in Critical care.

I rather have a nurse be a little nervous coming off orientation rather than being cocky. Take a deep breath- as others have said, you wouldn’t have made it this far if you weren’t capable. Just be alert and never be afraid to ask for help- run a scenario past another coworker, ask for another set of eyes, etc. Patients are better off with a nurse that is cautious than a nurse that is arrogant and overly confident.

You got this!

7 hours ago, Swirl531 said:

I am trying my best to BATTLE these thoughts (fears of making mistakes, imposter syndrome, low confidence, accidentally hurting a patient or missing something important such as an assessment finding that leads to patient decline, constantly thinking of all the things that can go wrong, etc, etc...)

Understandable. You are thinking too far ahead, though, and catastrophizing.

Instead of, for example, saying that since driving a car can be stressful you are probably going to get in an accident, say "I will stay in my lane." "I will stop at stop signs." "I will drive at a safe speed." In other words, start thinking about the completely positive and proactive things you know how to do and are going to do, one step at a time, that are going to lead to safety and your overall success.

Instead of "I'm so worried I'm going to hurt someone with a medication error," say, "I'm going to check the 5Rs and if I have any question I will consult my resources."

You can do this. Be well. Just rest and let yourself be excited about your new role. When fear creeps in, go through the above (identify fear, state what positive and proactive things you are going to do).

Take care ~

 

10 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

Understandable. You are thinking too far ahead, though, and catastrophizing.

Instead of, for example, saying that since driving a car can be stressful you are probably going to get in an accident, say "I will stay in my lane." "I will stop at stop signs." "I will drive at a safe speed." In other words, start thinking about the completely positive and proactive things you know how to do and are going to do, one step at a time, that are going to lead to safety and your overall success.

Instead of "I'm so worried I'm going to hurt someone with a medication error," say, "I'm going to check the 5Rs and if I have any question I will consult my resources."

You can do this. Be well. Just rest and let yourself be excited about your new role. When fear creeps in, go through the above (identify fear, state what positive and proactive things you are going to do).

Take care ~

 

I just took a screenshot of your advice to read when my fear and anxiety creeps in. Thank you. 🥺

Thank you all for your kind advice and consideration. I am so thankful to have this outlet for support. 😭

Nunya, BSN

Specializes in NICU/Mother-Baby/Peds/Mgmt. Has 39 years experience.

If you weren't ready to be off orientation, you wouldn't be.  I have 30 years experience and I still ask questions of my coworkers and am learning new things!

Edited by Nunya

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

All the PPs have very great advice for you, so I'd feel truly humbled if I were to add on anything new.

But I will say, that you are dealing with all those 'pregnant mommy hormones' that are kicking in on top of your 'new nurse-itis'. What a double whammy! So ...

Breathe! Think of your positives! Eat well, hydrate and get your rest!

And congratulations, on professional & personal levels!

 

 

ruby_jane, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing. Has 12 years experience.

On 10/25/2020 at 8:00 PM, JKL33 said:

Understandable. You are thinking too far ahead, though, and catastrophizing.

Instead of, for example, saying that since driving a car can be stressful you are probably going to get in an accident, say "I will stay in my lane." "I will stop at stop signs." "I will drive at a safe speed." In other words, start thinking about the completely positive and proactive things you know how to do and are going to do, one step at a time, that are going to lead to safety and your overall success.

Instead of "I'm so worried I'm going to hurt someone with a medication error," say, "I'm going to check the 5Rs and if I have any question I will consult my resources."

You can do this. Be well. Just rest and let yourself be excited about your new role. When fear creeps in, go through the above (identify fear, state what positive and proactive things you are going to do).

Take care ~

 

I think we all need a little JKL33 advice. Thank you for that!!

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Seconding this ^^^^^^.

yaRNthrower, BSN, RN

Specializes in School nurse and geriatrics.. Has 24 years experience.

Know we are all out here rooting for you. You have a wonderful week and keep us updated.