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dream'n BSN, RN

UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych
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dream'n has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych.

dream'n's Latest Activity

  1. dream'n

    How many jobs have you had in your career?

    Got my licence in 1993 and I've had 11 different employers. 28 years/11 employers=1 job per 2.6 years or so. That seems like alot to me, but most of my moving around was earlier in my career and few bad employers. Shortest job 2 days and longest 8 years. Left job because: 1st job: horrible insurance, horrible hours 2nd job: moving across the country 3rd job: angry about the treatment of medical staff versus administrative staff 4th job: employer closed down 5th job: toxic, toxic, toxic environment 6th job: lack of support and training, unsafe ratios 7th job: unsafe ratios, too long of a commute 8th job: sick of working the floor, wanted a less stressful position 9th job: CRAZY town and physical unsafe, non-medical administration overruling the medical personal 10th job: Got an awesome new position, horrible insurance, administration was like a cult running the place 11th: Current position
  2. Even if someone had a DNR tattoo, how could you defend yourself for NOT doing CPR if it ended up in court or before the Board? You don't know the person, maybe the tattoo is 20 years old and they had changed their mind but couldn't afford to remove it. Maybe they aren't competent, maybe it was a drunk joke, maybe it meant Da** No Regrets. Unless you are their nurse and have the DNR order, you better start BLS and call 911.
  3. If you want to be a no-code, that's your decision and I have no problem with it. What I do have a problem with is the position you are trying to put your colleagues in. They are not your nurses, they do not have your signed DNR and again even if they did, they have no way to know that it is the most current. What you TELL them doesn't matter, it legally doesn't add up to a hill of beans. If you code, they will start BLS and call 911. They would have to be stupid if they didn't, as they would be leaving themselves open to alot of professional and legal difficulties. That's the bottom line.
  4. If you want to be a no-code, that's your decision and I have no problem with it. What I do have a problem with is the position you are trying to put your colleagues in. They are not your nurses, they do not have your signed DNR and again even if they did, they have no way to know that it is the most current. What you TELL them doesn't matter, it legally doesn't add up to a hill of beans. If you code, they will start BLS and call 911. They would have to be stupid if they didn't, as they would be leaving themselves open to alot of professional and legal difficulties. That's the bottom line.
  5. I have no idea what my coworkers DNR status is and I find it a rather private decision I wouldn't want to discuss with them. Certainly some people may be comfortable sharing this with coworkers and that's fine. But if you were my coworker, it wouldn't matter what you SAID, you're not my patient and I don't have your DNR paperwork (and even if I did which is strange, I wouldn't know that it was the most current), therefore resuscitation would begin. I find it strange to worry (especially as your healthy) that you'll code at work and your coworkers would initiate BLS.
  6. I'm currently buying my first home and I am not young. Where I am it's a huge seller's market with housing prices rising by the week, but the interest rates are so historically low it makes sense for us to buy now. I regret not doing this much sooner in my life since I have nothing to show for all those years of rent money flying out the door. My recommendation is to buy something you can afford (not your dream home, but something with good bones in a growing area) and live there for awhile to build up some equity. Hopefully then you will be able to sell it and purchase a nicer home. Rinse and repeat as needed. Don't waste your money renting if you don't have to, get a house where your money will appreciate over time. Good Luck, the home buying process is not easy and is very stressful.
  7. dream'n

    Coworkers Competing For Vending Machine Food And Drinks

    This is kinda of funny. I can't help but wonder why staff doesn't bring their own Pepsi/Diet Pepsi and Reese Cups in? Heck bring in a Big Gulp and a couple packs of Reese Cups and be 'King of the Mountain', LOL
  8. dream'n

    Coping with the Death of a Fellow Nurse

    I've lost 2 coworkers I worked with on a daily basis in the past 2 years. They both passed suddenly and there was shock and a feeling of loss. I cried over both their deaths and miss their humor and presence in my life. No, I didn't grieve their passing like I would family or a close friend, but I certainly felt the loss. I also had a coworker (someone I actually didn't care for much on a personal level) be murdered many years ago when I first became a nurse. I went to the funeral and remember the person all these years later. It's part of who I am. It makes me sad to think that if I passed my coworkers wouldn't give it any thought, maybe that's selfish?
  9. dream'n

    Drive Right On By

    OP, I had the same thought hundreds of times when I worked in the hospital. I'd be driving in and thinking, "Crap it's way too late to call in, but if I miss my exit and keep going I'll end up in Mexico eventually. But then how can I explain to staffing that I'm in another country, on the beach with a margarita in hand." I never figured out a decent enough excuse to give, so I went to work.
  10. dream'n

    Is it rude to request additional shifts of orientation?

    Absolutely not rude
  11. dream'n

    New nurse, not eating so I can pass 20-30 patients' meds

    I have a question. The title of the post reads "New Nurse...", but the first line of your post states you are a medication aide. Are you a Medication technician, a LPN, or a RN?
  12. dream'n

    Ever date a patient? Or would you?

    Easy answer: NO
  13. dream'n

    New grad ED woes.. advice appreciated

    Just adding my 2 cents. Sometimes having them offer another position in the hospital is a kindness, BUT sometimes it's a bit of a scheme to fill a crappy position that nobody will take.
  14. dream'n

    Not doing a good job

    Think hard about what to do. Many years ago I had a boss that HATED me on a personal level (for illegal BS reasons) but I was a tough cookie and wouldn't let her push me out of my job. I worked hard and was polite. I knew I did my job well. I hung in there. She would downright lie about me and was so unprofessional she actually refused to speak to me for months even about urgent patient matters. She left me out of work meetings. Upper management wanted to appease her as she had been in the job for decades, but again, I had done nothing nor was doing anything wrong. She did her upmost best to get me to quit by making me miserable and I didn't want to give her the satisfaction. But I stayed too long. She made work such a living hell that my self-confidence eroded. I felt so lonely, depressed, anxious, and that something must be wrong with ME for someone to hate me so much. So I bit the bullet and resigned finally. It took a very long time for me to recover parts of myself that I had let her take from me. So I'm just saying to you or any other nurse that has experienced this; think long and hard before you allow yourself to be berated or undermined. There is no shame in leaving for your own sanity.
  15. dream'n

    Not doing a good job

    The manager says you should know HER job better than she does? And she is the type of person to talk about an employee behind his/her back with another employee? The manager sounds awful. Did she approach you with specific issues and discuss ways to improve with you? Did she really say that you feel too above it all to do the "dirty jobs?" If so, I'd look for another employer.
  16. dream'n

    Next Career Steps...undecided

    Adult Rehab can be very tough. Many times it's Med-Surg patients but with a much higher ratio or in the case of an LTAC, ICU patients with much higher ratios. Personally I wouldn't work in one. Plus the fact they are offering a bonus means they may have trouble getting staff to sign on or stay. You said they have already given you an offer, if it was pretty quick after the interview, I'd consider it quite probably as a red flag.