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More proof (in case you needed it) that HCA is evil

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You are reading page 2 of More proof (in case you needed it) that HCA is evil. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

i think hca has had a long history of placing profits before people, and this is just one example that happens to hit close to home for me.

now i can get behind this

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instead of the federal pen. and in all likelihood did not win the election either.

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It's my home state, I'm unfortunately all too familiar with its quirks!

I'm a new Floridian and my introduction to Florida nursing was at an HCA. I'm still learning lol.

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This isn't just a for-profit hospital issue.

Closing of Maternity units has been happening a lot in Philadelphia area over past several years with scant midwifery care available: Nineteen units existed in 1997; thirteen closed by 2001. One Catholic health systems 4 hospitals has no maternity unit-last 2 closed 10yrs ago. Reasons cited for closure included 85% Medicaid payer, low utilization rates.

maternal mortality and morbidity in pennsylvania - Merck for Mothers

Maternal mortality is on the rise in the U.S. In Philadelphia, the maternal mortality rate has more than doubled since 1980; now 27.4 deaths per 100,000 live births.

Philly's Maternity Care Coalition is working to reverse these statistics to improve the health and well-being of pregnant women and parenting families, and enhance school readiness for children 0-3. Merck pharmaceuticals has provided them with a grant to develop innovative programs to reduce mortality.

From Morning Call newspaper

Dec. 11, 2018

Maternity wards few and far between in some parts of Pennsylvania

More women in Pennsylvania are making these kinds of journeys for pregnancy care and delivery. According to the state Department of Health's annual hospital survey, from 2004 to 2014, Pennsylvania lost 28 obstetric units from a total of 124 units, a 23-percent decline.

The closures first hit urban centers and were mostly spurred by the consolidation of medical centers under a few health care networks, but the decline has branched out to suburban and rural areas

Edited by NRSKarenRN

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Yeah, the sad fact is that OB units do not make money for hospitals. Their payor mix is such that in many (most?) places, the majority of patients are Medicaid recipients.

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Yeah, the sad fact is that OB units do not make money for hospitals. Their payor mix is such that in many (most?) places, the majority of patients are Medicaid recipients.

One instance in which they do make money: when the Army has its Tricare beneficiaries deliver there. That always be a hoppin' L&D unit! Especially during a deployment baby boom.

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Is Centura evil too? They closed down their OB practices at penrose central, penrose community, the old saint Francis, and just recently at St. Mary Corwin.

Colorado has far too many hospitals and they struggle to keep up a cost efficient volume as a result. DG has so much debt it's insane, UCH and CHCO aren't far behind from all of their expansion (and CHCO only keeps their financials in the black because of donations). CHCO is building their new hospital on the north side of the springs because it has a better payer mix, and they built south campus for the same reason. UCH bought out those freestanding EDs and rebrands them, which is what caused such a surge of those ridiculous profit boxes; but you don't see them getting called out on that one. Centura is scaling back a lot of its hospitals, especially in areas with poor payer mixes. SCL doesn't do pediatrics since it isn't profitable, and you don't see them opening any hospitals in poorer areas of the state.

Every major player in Colorado is ran like a for profit, some just hide it better than others.

The location of both Rose (inner city Denver) and the other HCA practice (Aurora) means that a very large percentage of those patients affected by these closures are Medicaid.

Rose is definitely not the inner city. That title belongs to DG, Joe's, and PSL. If your ED isn't filled with hallway drunks you don't get to claim that title.

Rose is also very profitable and not in a poor part of town, the majority of their payer mix is private insurance or Medicare. Since they are also still in the county of Denver a fair number of the residents who have Medicare 'chose' (read: are tricked into) Denver Health Medicaid rather than Colorado state medicaid and thus are mandated to have their OB care through DG.

I'd be curious as to what the actual motivations are for shutting down those practices, but I doubt it is to shed Medicaid patients. I would wager it has more to do with the OB docs trying to get rid of a competing practice.

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