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Malpractice insurance

Emergency   (6,279 Views 19 Comments)
by BVFD 333 BVFD 333 (Member)

BVFD 333 has 14 years experience and specializes in ED, Cardiology.

5,432 Profile Views; 139 Posts

hi i am a brand new nurse starting in the er. i am a member of the ena, who offers malpractice insurance for around $ 100 a year. did you invest into this type of insurance, if yes which one do you have?

thanks so much,

my first day of work will be tomorrow.

Edited by Joe V

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ERRNTraveler is a RN and specializes in Peds, ER/Trauma.

672 Posts; 6,502 Profile Views

I've never paid for my own malpractice insurance- as a regular staff nurse & as a traveler, every hospital or travel company I've worked for provides it's nurses with free malpractice insurance- yours should too.

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,066 Posts; 136,682 Profile Views

i use nso: www.nso.com

you should compare the two policies offered, ena and nso (or others).

reasons why to carry malpractice insurance:

overdose of magnesium sulfate kills 18 mom in labor

if your license is disciplined

reinstated license after suspension

falsely accused of a hipaa violation

basic rationale to carry individual liability insurance policy:

all malpractice insurance policies have limits of liability. other defendants employed at your entity may and probably do share your liability limits under the same policy. if you, as well as others, are named in a suit, your legal costs, including any settlement, could exceed your employer's shared liability limits. this would mean out-of-pocket expense(s) for you.

i am a strong advocate for individual policies. small price to pay for peace of mind.

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BVFD 333 has 14 years experience and specializes in ED, Cardiology.

139 Posts; 5,432 Profile Views

thank's for your answers!

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,066 Posts; 136,682 Profile Views

You are very welcome.

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Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

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relying on the hospital to cover you is a dangerous thing - their interests may not always coincide with yours.

In fact, I guarantee you that, eventually, the day will come when an employer's interests do not coincide with yours. My father, a physician, advised me when I was in nursing school to never practice without my own liability coverage, and everything I've seen over the >20 years I've been in nursing has only reinforced the value of that advice. I would never consider working a day without my own coverage.

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bill4745 has 15 years experience as a RN and specializes in ICU, ER.

874 Posts; 9,099 Profile Views

In some cases, if the hospital's insurance paid a claim for you, their insurance company can sue you for the amount.

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BVFD 333 has 14 years experience and specializes in ED, Cardiology.

139 Posts; 5,432 Profile Views

In some cases, if the hospital's insurance paid a claim for you, their insurance company can sue you for the amount.

Wow, I had no idea. I will take the time tomorrow to sign up for it, thanks everybody, have a safe 4th of July!

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 153 Articles; 20,871 Posts; 188,384 Profile Views

I have always had NSO - since 1990! I only had one occasion to use it - for referral to a lawyer but it paid for itself in that one day.

Would never, ever practice without it. However, would never ever advertise the fact that I have it either.

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canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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I agree, do not tell anyone you have the insurance, but always have it in your back pocket.

If people know you have a $1 000 000 policy you become a big target, however there is nothing saying you can't speak to your attorney privately about issues where the hospital and you may have differing interests. Plus any complaint to the BON and you will be thanking every deity you know that you have someone on your side.

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JBudd has 38 years experience as a MSN and specializes in trauma, teaching.

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I've always carried my own (NSO). I do things like stop at roadside accidents, be the first aider for my various Scout troops, etc. My hospital covers me at work, but what if they decide I did something contrary to policy?

I look out for myself while I look out for others.

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