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Male nurse crying!!!

Men   (50,665 Views 172 Comments)
by ClassQ1 ClassQ1 (Member) Member

ClassQ1 has 1 years experience and specializes in ER/ICU.

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You are reading page 7 of Male nurse crying!!!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

donsterRN has 10 years experience as a ASN, BSN and specializes in Cardiac Care.

2,558 Posts; 31,202 Profile Views

regarding crying male nurse WHAT UP WITH THAT IS IT DISCRIMANTORY FOR A MALE TO CRY ? I s this the underlining question that has not being addressed

Actually, the question has been addressed, and we welcome all viewpoints. It's not necessary to shout.

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donsterRN has 10 years experience as a ASN, BSN and specializes in Cardiac Care.

2,558 Posts; 31,202 Profile Views

Don sorryI was not shouting thank you for letting me know i really appreicite it I am new to this computer typing god bless

No worries! Generally, in cyber-speak, all CAPS indicates shouting, and I thought you were shouting about something that's probably run it's course.

No apologies necessary, OK? Enjoy allnurses; we're glad you're here!

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RNdude123 specializes in Oncology.

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For my first few years in nursing I worked with high-risk OB inpatients. Unfortunately many of them led to fetal demise. Talk about tear-jerking! What made the experience special (for lack of a better term) for me was the fact that my wife and I lost our little girl at 38 weeks. I could really relate to these patients, and yes I did cry with a few. Nothing wrong with that at all. We take our personal experiences and our emotions into the room with us to help us cope with the challenges that are thrown our way. Just remember that it's about the patient (and family), not you. It's OK to show some emotion as long as it does not become a distraction to caring for the patient or family. When it gets to that point it's time to excuse yourself from the bedside.

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bisson has 8 years experience.

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first and foremost, i apologize for posting in a men's forum, but this is such a great thread, i couldn't resist.

real men do cry, my husband has broken down in front of me a few times, at first it scared me, especially me growing up in a family that never cries, especially men. after i got over the shock of it, i appreciated my husband's trust and openness to cry in front of me, i still can't cry in front of him.

now i haven't cried for my patients, although i care for them deeply, but working in the hospital somehow separated me from the emotional aspect of death. but the only time i chocked up was walking through a child's unit, one sight of a ill child in his bed, all by himself without his parents sent me into complete breakdown. being a mother, the MOST painful thought to me is my child being in the hospital, without me or going through any kind of pain or suffering. i can guarantee you that i will absolutely will not be able to withstand a death of a child.

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its ok to cry..even male nurses in brunei did cry if there's any touching or sad events. No matter it happen spontaneously or as we said we put our self in theirs shoes,happy or sad sometimes things just happen with it own reason.

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659 Posts; 9,589 Profile Views

Female here. my whole life I would rather die than have someone see me cry. I perceive it as weak. I know that's wrong and stupid but it takes a lot to make me cry, I just hate to do it.

And what's strange, my husband and son are blubbering idiots. They think I have ice water in my veins!

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malenurse1 specializes in Med/Surg.

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Each man deal with his emotions in his own way. I was raised by a career military father and crying was not to be tolerated from a man. FORTUNATELY, I have grown past that! When my mother died, I cried, alone and in private, but I cried. When my wife of 16 years announced that she was divorcing me and all through the process I cried often ... yes publicly. I have wept with patients who were sick and afraid that they weren't going to get better and with families of patients who were dying and of those who had already past. I am what you would call a manly man. 6', 220 lbs, with a mustache and a deep voice. I have learned over the years that hiding from you emotions is unhealthy. There is ABSOLUTELY nothing what-so-ever wrong with crying with a patient or their family in a time of loss. It lets them know that they are being cared for by someone who genuinely cares for them. Well, I will step down off my soapbox now and just finish by saying let it out guys!

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Andrew1403 specializes in CNA & Rn Student.

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it has actually been researched and found that the TEARS when you cry contain a certain amount of the hormone CORTISOL ...which is related to stress and is often called the "stress hormone" produced by the adrenal cortex...anyway it can be harmful to your well being in the long run...too always hold back your tears if you feel like crying...i am not a wuss or anything and also rarely cry ever...but the rare times that i do cry i do feel really good afterwards...like a monkey has been taken off my back....anyway just wanted to share that with you guys...i happened to stumble onto allnurses website ...and man these forums are awesome...i already found alot of information to questions i had by searching the different topics...anyways just wanted to throw my 2 cents out there...

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danissa has 12 years experience as a LPN, LVN and specializes in midwifery, NICU.

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Each man deal with his emotions in his own way. I was raised by a career military father and crying was not to be tolerated from a man. FORTUNATELY, I have grown past that! When my mother died, I cried, alone and in private, but I cried. When my wife of 16 years announced that she was divorcing me and all through the process I cried often ... yes publicly. I have wept with patients who were sick and afraid that they weren't going to get better and with families of patients who were dying and of those who had already past. I am what you would call a manly man. 6', 220 lbs, with a mustache and a deep voice. I have learned over the years that hiding from you emotions is unhealthy. There is ABSOLUTELY nothing what-so-ever wrong with crying with a patient or their family in a time of loss. It lets them know that they are being cared for by someone who genuinely cares for them. Well, I will step down off my soapbox now and just finish by saying let it out guys!

malenurse..you sound just like my Dad, the biggest man I ever knew, looked like a lion, with the heart of a lamb! And cried at the drop of a hat, when emo stuff hapened, even like my kiddos startin school!

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patrick1rn is a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

1 Article; 420 Posts; 9,665 Profile Views

The last time "being a nurse" made me cry?

Thank You's - Most Memorable Ones You've Received

The most poignant image of a man crying that has affected me?

b4-05-02.jpg

cheers,

Obviously this picture was taken in combat, things happen in combat, i can personally attest to that, but as far as Male RNs or LPNs who start crying at work because some bad stuff happens.. I have this to say to them.. quit being a ... your a man for the love of everything that is good. Women cry over emotional issues.

I tell it like it is

Pat

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