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LPNs in Children's Hospitals?

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Can anyone tell me if they work in a children's hosptal that employs LPNs? I'm seriously considering going to back to nursing school. The problem is I had a hell of time with some of my pre-clinical classes. That is why I'm asking about LPNs because I feel I could never handle the studying involved in becoming an RN.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

Our only LPNs work in the outpatient side.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Our only LPNs work in the outpatient side.

Same here.

If you want to work in Peds as a LPN, you can as a home health private duty nurse; if you want that inpatient side, at least in my area, you have to shoot for the RN.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

Rarely, often only outpatient departments and medical offices within the facility. I've big heard of an LPN in PICU in quite a few years due to scope of practice limitations.

SDALPN

Specializes in Peds(PICU, NICU float), PDN, ICU.

I worked NICU/PICU/ICU a few years back as an LPN. Some hospitals will hire us, but its hard to find. Much easier if you go for RN. I did the RN pre-reqs and they weren't much different from LPN. Most classes were the same.

~PedsRN~, BSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Pediatrics. Has 4 years experience.

There are no LPNs at my hospital, and most new hires have 4 year degrees.

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

I have seen job adds for the outpatient departments for LPNs, there is only one LPN in my hospital who's scope is limited to that of a CNA II. She was grandfathered in, as they do not hire LPN's anymore

HazelLPN, LPN

Specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU. Has 54 years experience.

I have seen job adds for the outpatient departments for LPNs, there is only one LPN in my hospital who's scope is limited to that of a CNA II. She was grandfathered in, as they do not hire LPN's anymore

An incredible insult to her education to force her to work as a CNA, because she's a nurse, not an aide and is legally held to the standards of the license that she earned. I only hope she is paid as an LPN.

MeganNYRN

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 5 years experience.

Nope you have a shot as a two year degree RN but most big teaching hospitals are preferentially hiring BSN( four year RN) now.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

Zero LPNs employed in any capacity when I worked in a Children's Hospital.

An incredible insult to her education to force her to work as a CNA, because she's a nurse, not an aide and is legally held to the standards of the license that she earned. I only hope she is paid as an LPN.

How is this an insult to her education? She is making the choice to work at an organization that does not utilize LPNs in a primary role. This is not uncommon. In fact, I have known LPNs who choose to work in acute care in a support staff role because they are paid better and have better benefits than primary nursing jobs they can get in the area in non-acute care. I am not saying there are not LPN jobs out there in acute care, but they are not abundant in most areas.

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

The CNA's in my facility get close to or over $20 an hour. Sure she could go work in a LTC with the title LPN. She still has the title LPN, but her scope is limited to support staff and not primary nurse. It is an awesome facility and she is great with our kids and families.

pedsRN1268

Specializes in Pediatrics. Has 3 years experience.

I'd say stick to the South, in non-Magnet nursing-certified hospitals. I'm from the North where almost no LPNs are still hired, and have been working in the South, where on many non-ICU floors, LPNs are still utilized. The problem you'd run into is with a Magnet hospital, regardless of where you live. Magnet hospitals require a certain (high) percentage of staff to have at least a Bachelor's degree, and I know that in my hospital, the policy was that if you didn't have your Bachelor's when you were hired, they expected you to be in school to get it and obtain your degree within a certain amount of time. So I'd say it's possible for you to be hired, especially if you have experience, but you'd probably have an easier time getting hired and keeping your position if you intended to go back to school.

HazelLPN, LPN

Specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU. Has 54 years experience.

How is this an insult to her education? She is making the choice to work at an organization that does not utilize LPNs in a primary role. This is not uncommon. In fact, I have known LPNs who choose to work in acute care in a support staff role because they are paid better and have better benefits than primary nursing jobs they can get in the area in non-acute care. I am not saying there are not LPN jobs out there in acute care, but they are not abundant in most areas.

How it is in an insult to her education?

I don't even know where to start.....so I won't.