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Lets do this differently for a change.

Posted

Specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

We time and time again are seeing threads about nurses eating their young. That we are so mean and terrible to newbies. Some say we are mean and some of us hold that just isnt true.

Lets do it differently this time

the question of the hour is.

Are all new nurses worth all the time and energy we give them, so that they in turn can say we were mean to them.

Just an interesting way of looking at something different

i don't think i can answer that objectively.

i do think some new grads come across as self-righteous.

but when i graduated, i'm sure i came across the same:

that while i didn't feel i knew it all, i did want to impress others with what i did know.

but as long as they can be redirected, then it's good.

it's the nurses who feel they know it already and don't want to hear anything more.

leslie

teeituptom, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

i don't think i can answer that objectively.

i do think some new grads come across as self-righteous.

but when i graduated, i'm sure i came across the same:

that while i didn't feel i knew it all, i did want to impress others with what i did know.

but as long as they can be redirected, then it's good.

it's the nurses who feel they know it already and don't want to hear anything more.

leslie

I knew you would be the first to respond.

I for one love to train the new nurses and actually asked to be a preceptor. MOST that come through actually want to learn and appreciate the training. The only think I hate is when our floor trains a nurse for another floor. After 6-8 weeks you kind of get attached to someone.

I try to remember that 3 years ago I was a new nurse and I was very lucky to get some good trainers.

We time and time again are seeing threads about nurses eating their young. That we are so mean and terrible to newbies.

As a recent grad that is currently in orientation I felt the need to reply...

I started my orientation with a very young RN that was very happy to share all the gossip about who I could trust and who I couldn't. She informed me that much of the older staff were mean and that they would be hard on me. I was with her only a couple of weeks before I realized that our personalities were not matched and that I was not receiving the 'best' training for me, personally.

I went to my nurse educator and discussed a switch. The switch was a bit difficult to arrange due to the limited number of preceptors available with so many new grads, however, my educator found a preceptor for me. The only catch? I would have to work almost all of my shifts with all of those "mean and terrible nurses" that would be so "hard" on me as a new nurse.

I am now on week 11 of a 12 week orientation and I could not be happier. Those awful nurses are wonderful educators. They are very set in their ways, as long as it is best practice, but it works for me. I can be anywhere on my unit and count on the fact that any one of them will seek me out if there is an interesting opportunity on the unit.

They do expect me to look information up and be prepared for my shift. It is expected that I will learn from tasks that I complete and be able to complete the task on my own the next time. I am expected to manage my time well, but I know that they are there if I need help. If I need someone to do something to catch me up, I know I can ask. Conversely, if I am finished with my tasks, I stop by and ask if anyone needs any help.

I really believe that every situation is only what the participants make of it... I chose to not make the first situation work for me because it was so against my work ethic and strong personality to sit back and gossip and never approach any problems. The second worked for me because it agreed with my work ethic and the other strong personalities meshed with mine.

I am tired and am not certain my story made much sense, but I said all of that to say it goes both ways. If you don't feel that a new grad is worth the time, don't precept and stay as far away as possible. If a new grad comes on and isn't in a situation that works well for them, they should switch (preceptor, floor, job, whatever, but switch). We all work in a stressful environment and there is no reason to add any more stress by working in situations that are not favorable.

ceecel.dee, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, ER, L&D, ICU, OR, Educator.

Are all new nurses worth all the time and energy we give them, so that they in turn can say we were mean to them.

Most of them are worth the time.

The ones that aren't do sap a person to the point of aggravation and real worry!

ukstudent

Specializes in SICU.

I have to reiterate what kaitsmama said. I'm a new grad in a icu, and have just asked for a new preceptor because I have not had a strong "these are the rules" and "this is how you need to do this" type of orienting yet. A had to ask my educator to find a type-A personality for me to learn from. I would rather be berated for doing something stupid and end up a safe nurse than have a nice easy happy time and get off orientation not knowing what I am doing and being unsafe for my patients.

clee1

Specializes in Hospice, Med/Surg, ICU, ER. Has 9 years experience.

Are all new nurses worth all the time and energy we give them, so that they in turn can say we were mean to them.

In a word.... YES.

New grads are Nursing's future. What you teach them will stick with them for their entire career. The best practices that YOU instill in them, will mark their practice FOREVER.

As to "so that they in turn can say we were mean to them", I can only say this: People are going to do/say whatever they want to do/say.

In my life, I have learned not to be too concerned with what others think of me or say about me in most cases. In the final analysis, if I am OK with God and my wife - I am about 99% OK.

I do NOT live my life for the approval of unrelated others!

prmenrs, RN

Specializes in NICU, Infection Control. Has 42 years experience.

Sooner or later, Tom, you will want to retire and golf full time. If you haven't been putting in time and effort w/the newbies, you won't be able to do that cuz no one will be there in your place.

So, just look @ it as saving for the future!

Havin' A Party!, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU, CM, Geriatrics, Management. Has 10 years experience.

Hey, Tom. Sorta sounds like we're not doing anything different here.

Just another thread where the underlying subject may be a few baddies from which we're to generalize about a whole population of folks... nurses that eat their young and younguns that aren't worthy.

Instead, let's go golfing / partying / whatever together!

loricatus

Specializes in ED, ICU, PACU.

Are all new nurses worth all the time and energy we give them, so that they in turn can say we were mean to them.

Just an interesting way of looking at something different

It's sorta like raising children. Give them quality time and energy and you have raised them right. When they hit adolescence, they rebel as a way to assert their own independence and eventually become a well-rounded (well-trained) adult that you can be proud of.

Give them negative time and energy (eg. belittlement, name-calling, back-biting, snide remarks...) that only serves to boast one's ego; &, more than someone saying you were mean to them is deserved for that type of time and energy that was spent on their behalf.

This question brings to mind that old Harry Chapin song...

I truly think that we should live our lives to selflessly help others with the gifts we were given, without regard to whether or not we are appreciated for our effort. A thank you, now and then, is nice but not necessary.

We time and time again are seeing threads about nurses eating their young. That we are so mean and terrible to newbies. Some say we are mean and some of us hold that just isnt true.

Lets do it differently this time

the question of the hour is.

Are all new nurses worth all the time and energy we give them, so that they in turn can say we were mean to them.

Just an interesting way of looking at something different

I usually love new nurses and consider myself welcoming to new nurses.

That said, there are three on my current unit that are absolutely horrid. They have attitudes like you wouldn't believe. A know it all with 20 years experience is bad enough, but when they've been nursing for more like 20 minutes it is incredibly annoying. I'm sure they think we're mean because we don't take their attitude nicely.

Sorry, vent over.

I have to reiterate what kaitsmama said. I'm a new grad in a icu, and have just asked for a new preceptor because I have not had a strong "these are the rules" and "this is how you need to do this" type of orienting yet. A had to ask my educator to find a type-A personality for me to learn from. I would rather be berated for doing something stupid and end up a safe nurse than have a nice easy happy time and get off orientation not knowing what I am doing and being unsafe for my patients.

That type of orientation is fine as long as you realize that not everything has to be done a certain way (the way your preceptor does it). Those preceptors can be great and teach a lot and create a safe nurse. They can also create monsters who are so rigid in their practice that they can't accept anyone doing things differently.

deeDawntee, RN

Specializes in Travel Nursing, ICU, tele, etc. Has 12 years experience.

i think there is responsibility on both sides of the teacher/student relationship. rarely is there a match made in heaven.

i believe there is some truth in just about everything posted here. new nurses come from nursing school being told that they know more than most nurses practicing, and to beware of the "sloppy" old nurses who do skills in terrible unsafe ways. (i heard it.)

then the old nurses who chew the new nurses up and spit them out... are notorious in the 'nursing culture'.

like any stereotype these generalizations are unfair. if you have two people committed to making a preceptor/preceptee relationship work...it certainly has a much better chance of succeeding. i think that in general these relationships do work...more people succeed than fail.

i know there are infinite examples on both sides where i can be proven wrong. it is just the positive or neutral experiences have much less staying power in people's minds, for the most part...

ericalynn, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, Ortho, Neuro.

As a new grad who is currently going through a residency program I can say YES! I am worth your time. I am like putty in your hands for you to mold, I have the foundation laid, and a solid knowledge base but as for the fine tuning of nursing I need you experienced nurses to help me with that. I have learned in the past 6 days that I have been on the floor that there is so much that we just don't learn in nursing school that can only really be taught on the floor by experienced nurses. I hope all of you experienced RN's out there who enjoy teaching will take on a new grad and show them the ropes, I think for the most part you won't regret it! I know I have a deep appreciation for my preceptors:smilecoffeecup:

teeituptom, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

In the old days we would classify newbies as will be's, wanna be's, will never be's and should never have been's

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Hey' date=' Tom. Sorta sounds like we're [i']not [/i]doing anything different here.

Just another thread where the underlying subject may be a few baddies from which we're to generalize about a whole population of folks... nurses that eat their young and younguns that aren't worthy.

99.999% of the new grads I've come across are eager to learn and work hard. The know it all lazy whiney ones who are cry babies are few and far between. Why let them ruin my opinion of new grads?

Isn't it golfing season??

nyapa, RN

Specializes in Jack of all trades, and still learning.

In the old days we would classify newbies as will be's, wanna be's, will never be's and should never have been's

I am an "old day" EN (LPN). I am a "new day" RN. I certainly don't remember classifying our newer members in those terms. A place of work doesn't run smoothly unless we all help each other. I appreciate those who help me, and I learn alot from them particularly as they have more experience.

Things have changed big time over the years; procedures that we performed that were considered essential are out of vogue to put it mildly these days. So I know we are all learning...and if we aren't then we will be left behind. I hope all of us newbies are given a chance to prove our worth.

The average age for nurses here is 45. I understand it is similar in the States? If we think nursing is shortstaffed now, what is it going to be like in 20yrs? Surely we should be making the profession more attractive? And a good way to start is supporting us newbies...

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