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Lazy patient

Nurses   (2,011 Views | 46 Replies)
by Katie622 Katie622 (New) New

393 Profile Views; 7 Posts

Am I obligated to clean up a patient when they are perfectly capable of doing it themselves but are just lazy/want someone else to do it for them? 

(Physical therapy has determined he is capable of doing it himself) 

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Elfriede has 40 years experience and specializes in ambulant care.

226 Posts; 4,029 Profile Views

I don´t think that they´re "lazy".

It´s a "call for attention".

Try to find out their social/family background.

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nznurse93 has 3 years experience as a BSN.

301 Posts; 3,330 Profile Views

Hard to say. Some are lazy. Some want attention. Some think it’s your job. 

it’s learning to judge, weather you need to be firm and tell them to do it or They may actually need minimal assistance/supervision or just encouragement. 

Also things change, they may have been fine earlier with the physio, but are struggling later in day. You can’t use that as your reason why a pt was left in a mess. you are still obligated. 

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Silverdragon102 has 32 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

7 Followers; 1 Article; 39,117 Posts; 144,328 Profile Views

Me personally would assist them, ie get everything together and then prepare and hand them the equipment encouraging their independence and enforcing I will assist you but you are able to do a lot yourself 

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12 Followers; 3,984 Posts; 30,140 Profile Views

14 hours ago, Katie622 said:

Am I obligated to clean up a patient when they are perfectly capable of doing it themselves but are just lazy/want someone else to do it for them? 

(Physical therapy has determined he is capable of doing it himself) 

 

Context is important.

Everything depends upon what is motivating the patient's behavior. If they expect that they are in a facility where nurses are employed to do this "for" them and that's their sole rationale for wanting it done, obviously that isn't okay. But there are a lot of other possibilities, such was what a previous poster mentioned: They may be actually worn out by the time you're on the scene and really could use some help.

Don't assume, do find out their rationale/motivation. Go from there.

Also, it's probably best to not think in terms of whether or not they are "lazy" or whether or not you have an "obligation" to help them. Instead, think in terms of what action of yours would facilitate that which is therapeutic.

Is it therapeutic to do everything for someone who is capable of doing at least part of a task for themselves? Usually not.

Is it therapeutic to demand that a patient do something when they have exhausted their energies and/or are not able to continue for some other legitimate reason that day? No, that isn't therapeutic either.

 

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CharleeFoxtrot has 7 years experience as a ADN, RN.

606 Posts; 7,330 Profile Views

27 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

 

Don't assume, do find out their rationale/motivation. Go from there.

 

Just so, need to find out what the barriers are to the patient performing (whatever) because until you know the "why" you can't move forward with education.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,402 Profile Views

NOTE: this is a newbie post which could make it just fodder for my wanting some popcorn.

But I just don't think it is for this one, and I'm giving OP my benefit of the doubt.

I don't know about 'being lazy', or 'call for attn' or 'needing assistance, supervision or encouragement'. Is he fully functional at the time for other tasks (to rule out fatigue)? I do think maybe there's might just be something 'kinky' there. HE wouldn't be the first.

If he's demonstrated that he's NOT incapacitated doing other functions, then prepare him for discharge. Make sure the Case Manager, Discharge Planner, Social Worker, is involved so he knows.

I'm usually one all for going the extra yard for the pt, but sometimes we all get the THAT gut feeling when we're think we're being taken advantage of.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,402 Profile Views

After I posted, I noted that OP had another recently opened, then closed SIMILAR post. I don't know if this is one and the same pt, but I do think it is.

The pt sounds like discharge-ready. He'll eventually run out his insurance coverage.

I will amend my prior post to say that yes, this pt DOES need some further interventions as to his motivation for his actions. And there well may be several to address. But I don't believe the bedside nurse is the one to have to be all  the professionals  needed here.

So to OP - someone else did comment that this pt still needs his care done. Just keep it short & simple and be done with it.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

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What does "obligated" mean here OP?

 If I was sure the patient could perform the task,  I would not do it for them. Our role is teach independence.

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hppygr8ful has 15 years experience and specializes in Psych, Addictions, Elder Care, L&D.

6 Followers; 3 Articles; 2,930 Posts; 33,165 Profile Views

IF this a rehab patient in the US what are his RUG Scores where I worked if a patient was not cooperative with his rehab or not making progress in getting better Medicare stopped paying and the patient was discharged home or to a different level of nursing. Perhaps the patient needs a visit from utilization to be told that if he can't participate in his rehab he may have to be discharged.

Hppy

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,402 Profile Views

hppy - that's EXACTLY what I meant as 'discharge-ready'.

Thing is he prob IS  participating in formal Therapy sessions in the Rehab Room. Just not doing it on the unit.

Still he should then be maxed out and disch'd.

Edited by amoLucia

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beachbabe86 specializes in Oceanfront Living.

64 Posts; 256 Profile Views

Your patients are to be taken care of.  They are not scored individuals to be analyzed if they can "do it or not".  

What has happened to human compassion?

Feel free to flame away.

 

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