Is it wrong to ask for a raise?

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Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 6 years experience.

SilverBells, BSN

Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 6 years experience.

2 hours ago, hppygr8ful said:

You haven’t been around Long enough to fully appreciate the lengths the OP goes to garner sympathy and attention. Of course there are staff nurses on duty. Silver bells  is a manager but has never been able to explain why she does not trust staff nurses to do their jobs.

At this point, it doesn't really have much to do with lack of trust of staff members and everything to do with my supervisors' expectations to basically be at 875 different places all at the same time

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 19 years experience.

28 minutes ago, SilverBells said:

I will be responsible for all emergencies, all provider visits, all Care Conferences, all discharges, assisting in all admissions, follow up with all complaints .

As a manager I can see having to handle emergencies, provider visits and care conferences but the last two items can be scheduled for a time when there are two managers in house. A manager should not have to be present for discharges and admissions.

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 19 years experience.

16 minutes ago, SilverBells said:

At this point, it doesn't really have much to do with lack of trust of staff members and everything to do with my supervisors' expectations to basically be at 875 different places all at the same time

So quit you are a Master’s prepared nurse with management experience. Jobs are plentiful right now

I am not a manager but have worked as shift supervisor I understand your situation. What I would do Is I would speak to my nurses and ask them for their help until your get someone else on your team. And why should you be stuck late and having do all the admissions? I do my own admissions , and if someone helps, I welcome it, but I don't expect a unit manager or DON to take up that task. 

 

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

17 hours ago, hppygr8ful said:

You haven’t been around Long enough to fully appreciate the lengths the OP goes to garner sympathy and attention. Of course there are staff nurses on duty. Silver bells  is a manager but has never been able to explain why she does not trust staff nurses to do their jobs.

Oh, but I have been on here long enough. I've called SB out more than once on the ridiculousness of their comments. A couple of others are giving sympathy and the whole 9 yards, this was my sarcastic way of saying 'look at the obvious', just as I believe klone was doing. I've gotten to the point that I seldomly reply to SBs whining. I just hadn't replied to anything for a few days, first post I came to that made me laugh at the OP

 

ETA: anyone on here more than 5 minutes has this yayhoo figured out... 

SilverBells, BSN

Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 6 years experience.

I actually have been putting in applications for other jobs, but nothing has really turned up.  Surprisingly, I've had random agencies reach out to me regarding DON positions, but I haven't bothered pursuing any of them since I anticipate it would only be more hours and stress, which, to me, defeats the purpose of looking for another job.  Any job application that I have put in hasn't resulted in anything.  I'm reluctant to leave my position without a backup plan set in place, so seeking a raise at my current position seems like the best option.  For now, at least.  

Edited by SilverBells

SilverBells, BSN

Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 6 years experience.

I also don't necessarily know how much I will necessarily fight for the raise either.  Any type of employment is better than being jobless, I suppose.  In addition to simply wanting to be better compensated for the hours I work, considering I haven't had a raise in over 2 years, I'm also hoping that an increase in pay could lead to more money for a house.  However, my house-hunting is not going very well and it is doubtful my raise would be enough to allow me to afford something I want.   The housing market is simply very expensive, at least in my area, especially for a single nurse.   One of my biggest fears in life is that I will end up as an apartment owner; without a raise, this seems inevitable, and even with a raise, I'm afraid there still is a good chance of this happening.  

MPKH, BSN, RN

Specializes in General Internal Medicine, ICU. Has 10 years experience.

What’s the point of asking for a raise if you don’t have a plan for what to do if your request is denied? I can see it as leverage point if you have an offer elsewhere, but you don’t. If your plan is to stay regardless of getting a raise, then I don’t see a point in asking. It doesn’t hurt to ask, but you need to have a plan if the answer is no. 

And oh no, owning an apartment is such a bad thing 🙄

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

On 11/22/2021 at 8:54 PM, SilverBells said:

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Today, I found out that when my co-manager steps down in December, his replacement will only be working Monday through Thursdays. This means that every single Friday,  I will have up to 56 patients. If we get admits, I'll be the one constantly staying late. I will be responsible for all staffing issues and filling in for call-ins. It also means I can't ever take a Friday off or have a 3 day weekend because this other person will be gone.  I have received no pay increase for 2 years. Would it be wrong to ask for a raise, given the additional responsibilities and less flexibility in my scheduling? 

You still have that ridiculously awful job?

FolksBtrippin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Community, Nurse Manager. Has 5 years experience.

It is never wrong to ask for a raise. And you don’t have to know what you’ll do if they say no. You can let that simmer. What you should know, is how much more you want. And it doesn’t hurt to show how much more you were offered elsewhere. That usually gives an employer pause.

The question is whether you really want more money though. Because will that really solve your current problem? 
 

It sounds like your problem is having more responsibility than you want and/or is reasonable and/or can handle.

So ask for a raise if you really want one (and be specific about the amount) but also understand that you probably more urgently need to address the creeping up of your workload, and your ongoing issue of being treated unfairly. 
 

You could use this situation to your advantage. Would you like a 4 day workweek? You might ask your superiors for every Monday off, since the nurse manager position now seems to be a 4 day a week position. Would you rather have that than a raise? Then you and your new colleague would have a better chance of getting along well, would have a mutual interest in keeping the workload light on Mondays and Fridays, and all might work in your favor.

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

On 11/25/2021 at 11:33 AM, SilverBells said:

I actually have been putting in applications for other jobs, but nothing has really turned up.  Surprisingly, I've had random agencies reach out to me regarding DON positions, but I haven't bothered pursuing any of them since I anticipate it would only be more hours and stress, which, to me, defeats the purpose of looking for another job.  Any job application that I have put in hasn't resulted in anything.  I'm reluctant to leave my position without a backup plan set in place, so seeking a raise at my current position seems like the best option.  For now, at least.  

Have you had any job interviews?  If so that is a good sign.  If you have but weren't chosen, have you asked for feedback on how you could improve from the hiring manager or HR?  Do you think your employer is blacklisting you to keep you there or have you asked them not to contact your employer?  What happened with the other job you've been doing PRN?  Have you used them as a reference.   Do you have good references to your knowledge?

I wouldn't automatically reject the DON offers out of hand.  It would be a promotion and I would expect a substantial pay raise especially as you have a MA.  You can check them out and see if they are a big enough employer to be on glass door or indeed to see what employees have to say.  If you can find one that has a good reputation you could take the job as a stepping stone toward your ultimate future goal.  I doubt you would end up working more than you already do.  You could research if these places have decent staffing and admit/discharge planner or RN, wound care RN etc.  Also you already have an idea on what can be delegated to lighten your load, but still be fair to the staff under you.

Leader25, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 38 years experience.

You are in management,you work on a salary....so...sorry cant help.