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Is it frowned upon by supervisors and coworkers if a new grad nurse pursues DNP?

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jeexrn jeexrn (New) New Nurse

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I am a new grad nurse and started working on a neuro unit in Oct 2020. Due to the hiring freeze at hospitals cause of COVID-19, I had couple months of break between the time I passed the NCLEX and when I landed the job. I always wanted to pursue higher education and during my "break" period, I applied to a PMHNP program. I have always been interested in psych and that's where I want to head towards in my career. By the time I start PMHNP program (if I get accepted), I will have 10 months of experience. My hospital offers tuition assistance after 6 months and wanted to apply for it when the time comes. However, some of my friends told me to keep it a secret even after I get accepted since supervisors and coworkers will not like the fact that I am going back to school so soon. I don't see it as a big deal because by the time I finish school, I will have about 4-5 years of nursing total. I was wondering if I can get some of you guys' opinions and thoughts about this issue!! Should I just keep the news to myself or is it okay to let my supervisors know?? Thank you!

Even though it is none of their business what you do outside of work, do yourself a favor and keep the info to yourself. You don’t want ‘braggadocio’ associated with your name.

Thank you for your input! The reason why I want to let my supervisors know is so that I can apply for tuition assistance through my hospital, not to brag that I applied or got accepted to a DNP program. Wanted to clarify that!

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

I would hold off on all the notifying UNTIL you get accepted. You can apply if and when that happens. 

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

Some people will frown upon it, some won't. You can't please everybody. I started my PMHNP program 9 months after I graduated from BSN. I didn't announce it to everyone, but I did not hide it. Most people didn't care, and some were happy for me (I worked in a psych facility).

I would recommend getting some psych nursing experience if you're going into PMHNP. Neuro knowledge is great, but pretty different from what will be useful as a PMHNP.

Edited by umbdude

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

There might just be one glitch in this discussion. As you become more involved deeper into your school program, SCHOOL becomes your priority. Your work/job will prob become second place. That might make the employer 'benefactor' unhappy. They're holding the purse-strings.

And that's pretty much the school/job direction goes from the readings I've seen here.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

3 hours ago, amoLucia said:

There might just be one glitch in this discussion. As you become more involved deeper into your school program, SCHOOL becomes your priority. Your work/job will prob become second place. That might make the employer 'benefactor' unhappy. They're holding the purse-strings.

And that's pretty much the school/job direction goes from the readings I've seen here.

PLUS you've just telegraphed your intention to leave in your first three weeks of employment. . 

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 27 years experience.

You'll have to tell your manager once you are admitted to the program for practical reasons, not just because you're asking for tuition reimbursement (which in my case didn't need to have a manager approval) but also because your schedule requests would reflect your school commitment.  You don't have to tell co-workers unless they have to know (like if you were trying to switch schedules with someone).  I would advise against speaking of what you're learning to correct someone's practice unless it's a safety risk situation.  Even then, I wouldn't phrase it as "I was taught to do this in NP school" kind of thing.

When I was attending my NP Program, my manager and many of the other nurses knew I was in school.  I was working in a large ED where 2 other nurses are in the very same class as myself and one other nurse was attending another program in the area.  It wasn't such a big deal in my experience but the ED had a lot of senior nurses and never had a shortage of new and qualified applicants when we have an opening.  Many expected that I won't be there long.

11 hours ago, umbdude said:

Some people will frown upon it, some won't. You can't please everybody. I started my PMHNP program 9 months after I graduated from BSN. I didn't announce it to everyone, but I did not hide it. Most people didn't care, and some were happy for me (I worked in a psych facility).

I would recommend getting some psych nursing experience if you're going into PMHNP. Neuro knowledge is great, but pretty different from what will be useful as a PMHNP.

After working on my floor for about 6 months, I plan to either take a per diem job at a psych unit or after 1 year, get a job as a psych nurse! Well, that’s my plan anyway so hopefully this happens.

Thank you everyone for replying! I definitely won’t announce it to everyone and will let my supervisors know when and if I get accepted for scheduling purposes.

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 10/17/2020 at 1:54 AM, caliotter3 said:

do yourself a favor and keep the info to yourself. You don’t want ‘braggadocio’ associated with your name.

Why don't we in nursing 'celebrate' our coworkers achievements. What was the OP supposed to do -- sit at home watching the soaps and not doing anything to better themself? Just plain jealousy. Others resent the efforts to achieve. I know your advice is the best but when do we confont the real issue?

Oh I forgot - we do celebrate the 50 years of  faithful bedside nursing (no call outs !) you are recognized for when you retire,

aaa.JPG

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

You usually apply for tuition assistance through HR or another separate department, not via your manager. 

I don't see it as a jealousy issue, but there's not much more irritating to a hiring manager and preceptors than people who flat out tell you upon hire that they plan to leave - I work in CTICU and 90% of our new staff plan to work a year for their resume, then go to NP/CRNA school. It's huge time and energy investment to train and mentor new staff, and pretty disrespectful when they can't even pretend to be interested in the unit for its own sake. (Not saying that's what you would do, just an opinion from the other side).

GreenMagus87

Specializes in Chaplaincy to Nursing.

If the hospital administration didn't want new hires to pursue advanced education, they wouldn't have a tuition assistance program available after 6 months.

You can't please everyone, I'd notify only those you need to for the tuition assistance. Be humble, but not so much you deny yourself an available benefit.

spotangel, DNP, RN, NP

Specializes in ED,Tele,Med surg, ADN,outpatient,homecare,LTC,Peds. Has 32 years experience.

OP, good for you if you want to pursue a DNP.Speak to others availing tuition reimbursement and ask them how they went about it in your institution. If you have a union rep talk to them, they may know your "rights". Read the union handbook /contract and also the hospital policy. You need to let your manager know once you get acceptance and get your schedule. Make sure, the schedule is a doable for you and doesn't cause undue hardship for your unit. I chose a program that was hybrid but had 1-2 class a month for 2 years on a Friday. Just finished in May but heard plenty of comments good and bad from the staff!  I didn't publicise it but did not keep it a secret. I was very matter of fact and called myself a "nerd" !  I ignored the bad comments, appreciated the good ones and did not engage but focused on my work and studies. I was extra careful with my work  and nobody could complain that I was slacking! You have to be very disciplined and organized between work,school and home.

That being said,try and get some experience in the same unit before shifting to a different unit.Makes you look reliable and not ready for takeoff! Try and transfer rather than going perdiem. You can save on money as they will have to honor your school commitments in psych and continue tuition reimbursement. All luck! Message me if I can be of any assistance!

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

On 10/19/2020 at 11:33 AM, londonflo said:

Why don't we in nursing 'celebrate' our coworkers achievements. What was the OP supposed to do -- sit at home watching the soaps and not doing anything to better themself? Just plain jealousy. Others resent the efforts to achieve. I know your advice is the best but when do we confont the real issue?

Oh I forgot - we do celebrate the 50 years of  faithful bedside nursing (no call outs !) you are recognized for when you retire,

aaa.JPG

We should cheer our coworkers on for sure. But there's always going to be some that don't. They can work to make life a living nightmare for someone who just want to better themselves. Most of us have seen or heard of that garbage in action

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

On 10/19/2020 at 11:50 AM, ghillbert said:

You usually apply for tuition assistance through HR or another separate department, not via your manager. 

I don't see it as a jealousy issue, but there's not much more irritating to a hiring manager and preceptors than people who flat out tell you upon hire that they plan to leave - I work in CTICU and 90% of our new staff plan to work a year for their resume, then go to NP/CRNA school. It's huge time and energy investment to train and mentor new staff, and pretty disrespectful when they can't even pretend to be interested in the unit for its own sake. (Not saying that's what you would do, just an opinion from the other side).

This is pretty much what I was going to say.  It's somewhat demoralizing as a preceptor when every new grad who takes a job in our CTICU announces at the start that they're just there for their resume and then they plan to go on to bigger and better things.  It seems that very few are actually interested in the unit or our patients -- it's just a box they're checking off.  It's also irritating to listen to a new grad go on and on about how much money they're going to make when they're an NP, a CRNA  or MD.  I've actually had new grads tell me there must be something wrong with me because I'm still at the bedside.  Not saying the OP would be anything like that, but hoping  they wouldn't be!