Implied/actual 'Right' for nurses to 'Do' Hands-on Procedures.

Published

Given the recent hysteria-level emotive responses to member Cowboy's concerns, perhaps a longitunal overview/current appraisal of the gist of his topic might well be indicated?

Recent mal-awareness of the legally-proper/socially-needful 'Informed Consent' appears to have (in some areas, & moreso where litigation action is rife), distorted matters, but it really seems to me, that many members here who've already demonstrated a high-dudgeon/angst over the 'state of the art' could do with a refresher/reality-check as to expectations of the actual duties/responsibilities in performing hands-on interventions - as a duty duly owed by health-care givers to recipients (& how readily they are understood/accepted by patients/clients) - nowadays.

Another related aspect might be further discussed, viz: the 'cultural/unwritten' lore by which nurses do indeed provide their cares, (& the recent, seemingly insidious indoctrination of unscientific yet ironically ultra-dogmatic post-modern/feminist ideology into nursing praxis, IMO, a demonstrably baleful shadow which debases/demeans our professional standing).

The negative impact of non-clincal staff such as Corporate manager, & their HR/legal depts, along with outside but strident 'pressure groups' with a poor understanding of the issues concerning nursing - might well also be a discussion point for the student nurse - since these things seldom seem to be part of the study curriculum in 'nusing education', either.

Claralee

28 Posts

I have no idea as to what thread you are referencing, the one about the legality of refusing a male nurse or another one? However, i think the phrase " hysteria level emotive* phrase is telling. I am assuming you and cowboy are both men?

Beyond that I honestly can't follow much if anything of your post. Each of your paragraphs is a single run on sentence that even an expert in the field might struggle with, let alone student nurses.

James W.

146 Posts

46 minutes ago, Claralee said:

I have no idea as to what thread you are referencing, the one about the legality of refusing a male nurse or another one? However, i think the phrase " hysteria level emotive* phrase is telling. I am assuming you and cowboy are both men?

Beyond that I honestly can't follow much if anything of your post. Each of your paragraphs is a single run on sentence that even an expert in the field might struggle with, let alone student nurses.

C'mon now Claralee, "honestly."

Can nursing-student program entry/reading comprehension-skill prerequisites really be so lax, nowadays? Just wait 'til you have to read research!

& about that, how might 'James', or 'Cowboy' be indicative of gender, & also, what would "hysteria-level emotive" be "telling" of, IYO?

Why'd you reckon the thread you (correctly) noted was closed for review?

Are you actually asking for 'mansplaining', maybe?

( Only joking).

Tenebrae, BSN, RN

1 Article; 1,806 Posts

Specializes in Mental Health, Gerontology, Palliative. Has 11 years experience.

You/me/any nurse has the right to provide the care the patient allows you to

Nothing more, nothing less

Kallie3006, ADN

389 Posts

Specializes in Surgical, Home Infusions, HVU, PCU, Neuro. Has 7 years experience.

I read that 3 times and believe/infer that I am more confused each time, and I do read/study/reference research.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

164 Articles; 21,189 Posts

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 31 years experience.

Per our terms of service:

We promote the idea of lively debate. This means you are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. Additionally, please refrain from name-calling. This is divisive, rude, and derails the thread.

Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide. There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling.

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@James W. as nurses we can provide the care that the patient allows, nothing more. Its not about US, its about the patients. (And thank you to several others who stated the same sentiment).

Horseshoe, BSN, RN

5,879 Posts

This OP seems like a thinly disguised attempt to reincarnate a thread that was shut down by the mods (and not for any "hysteria-level emotive responses").

Quote

We, as nurses we can provide the care that the patient allows, nothing more. Its not about US, its about the patients.

This is the gist of the responses given over and over in the thread you referenced; this message is appropriate for that thread, and now, for this one. The consent implied when a patient signs the paperwork given to him when he first arrives at a healthcare facility can be revoked at any time. As all of us will eventually be patients, this is something we should uniformly stand behind. The right to refuse any/all care is precious. We retain our autonomy at all times while we are patients, therefore the "rights" belong solely to us. No nurse or doctor or any other practitioner has "rights" over our bodies that supersede our own. And that is a good thing.

traumaRUs said it succinctly and accurately. What else, really, can be said?

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

164 Articles; 21,189 Posts

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 31 years experience.

@James W. - yes the patient has the right to ask for whoever they want to care for them. It happens all the time in the US. It may not be "right" but it happens. Please move on to a different topic.

Has 10 years experience.

I'm sorry, you may want to edit this because it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Drop the descriptives...just tell the story.

@James W.I posted this in the thread Cowboy made that you are referring to...

Simply put, this topic is about sexism. Sexism is discrimination and/or prejudice against another based solely on one's sex. Cowboy and/or James W, can you honestly tell me that you feel your fundamental rights are violated when a female refuses your care involving an intimate procedure? If so, what right is being infringed on?

In case you didn't see it, I will post it in your thread too.

Specializes in Community/Public Health. Has 3 years experience.

I don't understand why someone would insist on performing care on someone who is requesting services from a different provider.

If the request can be accommodated, sure. If not, inform the patient of their options and allow the patient to choose how to proceed.

That's literally the basis of trauma-informed care.