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'I love my patients!'.

Posted

Specializes in Medical - Surgical. Has 9 years experience.

You are reading page 2 of 'I love my patients!'.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

What other job expects the worker to love the job, love the client, not care about the money, etc? Yea, take your time while I brew myself some coffee....

Anyway...just wondering what your thoughts are.

Do you really love nursing and love your patients? And what do you mean exactly when you utter (write) that phrase?

Is it like writing 'LOL' even though you're not even smiling?

First I want to clear up your statement that we aren't supposed to care about money. I totally care about the money. Money and the various opportunities are the reasons I became a nurse not because of some calling. That said I do say that I love some of my patients, mostly the kids. I love the ones that have had a horrible time in this lifetime and are still fighting. Not exactly how to describe it but sort of like chemistry some just click and not for a reason you can put your finger on. Imo this job is too hard not to love it for the most part.

no, i do not love all my pts.

but of course, i do tend to love the fresh, cantankerous old ladies.

i do love my job and that can spill over as to how i treat my pts.

that said, i've had some monsters who i've had nasty thoughts about.

(for instance, an angry man who threw a filled, colostomy bag at me).

but i am no angel of mercy, and have muttered 'bite me' to myself, more than once.

leslie

ShayRN

Specializes in Corrections, Cardiac, Hospice. Has 18 years experience.

but i am no angel of mercy, and have muttered 'bite me' to myself, more than once.

leslie

YIPPEE! I thought I was a horrbile person when I did that, but if YOU do it, its ok for me, ROFL.:yeah:

YIPPEE! I thought I was a horrbile person when I did that, but if YOU do it, its ok for me, ROFL.:yeah:

that's my problem- i seldom feel horrible for my thoughts.

i won't even tell you about the time that mr. x died, and we broke into a chorus of "ding dong, the witch is dead, the wicked witch...":lol2:

but we pulled ourselves together very quickly.

it happens.

leslie

ShayRN

Specializes in Corrections, Cardiac, Hospice. Has 18 years experience.

LOL, I completely understand.

wanderlust99

Specializes in ICU/PACU. Has 10 years experience.

"Love" is a word that is misused sometimes. I will say I "love" her when I really mean that she was a sweet, easy, and delightful patient that I enjoyed caring for that day. Sometimes that happens.

My first 2 years I will admit I didn't love my patients. In fact I was pretty annoyed by them. A couple of them I connected with, but for the most part I think it was just me being a new nurse and stressed out so I wasn't the best I could be. For some reason my attitude eventually changed and I started "nursing" differently. I got to the basics of nursing and really opened myself up to these patients and allowed myself to care about them and their situations. I don't know what happened but nursing is much more rewarding this way.

I like my job. Some days I don't look forward to coming to work, other days I do, just depends on my mood for that day and how much sleep I got during the day.

There are some pts I remember more than others. Sometimes I can't help to wonder the outcome of a pt that was transferred to the ICU that had to be coded in the ER. But that don't last too long once I leave the hospital.

In the beginning I was taking my job home and getting sick physically. Now, once I leave the hospital, I press the "delete" button.

I think nursing is more about being able to maintain a professional, respectful attitude towards your patients vs. "loving" them. I don't care who you are, patients are people too and if you haven't met that special patient who will push your buttons until you want to scream you haven't been a nurse for very long.

I entered nursing with the attitude that I would be this all-compassionate individual. That is until I met Mr. X who swore at me or Ms. Y who wanted me to be her personal slave. Nursing is dysfunctional without loving yourself, which means respecting your boundaries and letting others know how you want to be treated. I might be very frustrated with a patient (perhaps she lied to me at the last visit) but she will get the same respectful attention and professionalism as anyone else. IMHO, that is more important than this expectation of universal love. Sorry but I'm human and I know it!

When I say "I love my patients" I mean that I love what I do most days and the way I work with people.