Jump to content

Had to work as CNA

Posted
Sol95 Sol95 (New) New

Hello everyone, i have been working in this LTC /rehab facility in MA as a staff nurse for 3 years now, my shifts are two 7pm to 7 am shifts and two 11-7 shifts, sometimes i have to work 4 hours on one floor and 8 hours on another floor, not a problem. Recently they asked me to switch my schedule to work only 11-7 shifts which i declined as this is not what i originally agreed to. Next thing i know i come to work and i am beeing told that we are short CNA's and i have to work 4 hours as a CNA and the rest of the shift as a nurse. What do you think about this?

I think they were short a CNA and needed the help for 4 hours.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

I was pulled from charge in PICU to be a safety sitter in the adult world. It falls under "other duties as assigned".

Meh- just do it.

When I worked in the hospital I was pulled a few times - sometimes it was easy money other times back breaking work - tech work, 1:1 sitter in pedi psych unit, "handwash patrol" in NICU during Flu season - the handwashing patrol was the best - lol.

I would much rather be pulled to do other non nursing duties then to be put on call or just cancelled.

Lucydog14

Has 13 years experience.

It's not below me as a nurse. Job descriptions usually state " other duties as assigned ".

Crush

Specializes in Case manager, float pool, and more. Has 13 years experience.

I think they were short a CNA and needed the help for 4 hours.

Exactly. I have had to do that before in LTC. They were short a CNA and that was where you were needed.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

I've worked OT as an RN in the aid role before. I just took care of patients the same as always minus assessments and med passes and watched the clock tick thinking I was the highest paid aid in the building. When a patient asked me for paid meds or something I grinned ear to ear and said, "I'll let your nurse know."

It was super common in tele at my hospital. They would staff heavy and have the extra nurses work as CNAs the first half of the shift knowing that a multitude of admissions would be coming in through the shift and then they would take the new admits. Worked pretty well IMHO.

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Hello everyone, i have been working in this LTC /rehab facility in MA as a staff nurse for 3 years now, my shifts are two 7pm to 7 am shifts and two 11-7 shifts, sometimes i have to work 4 hours on one floor and 8 hours on another floor, not a problem. Recently they asked me to switch my schedule to work only 11-7 shifts which i declined as this is not what i originally agreed to. Next thing i know i come to work and i am beeing told that we are short CNA's and i have to work 4 hours as a CNA and the rest of the shift as a nurse. What do you think about this?

This question comes up frequently. I've worked as "the CNA" occasionally ...usually when I have an orientee that's about to graduate and our CNAs are short staffed. In a way, it's like a day off. On the other hand, the work can be more physical and the routine is completely different than what I'm used to as a nurse. If I were regularly assigned to work as the CNA, I would probably have sought work elsewhere.

My current job assigns me as a 1:1 sitter sometimes, and I dislike that more. It's easy work, but very boring.

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice.

I started as a CNA in 1990, if my unit was short a CNA and over staffed with nurses I always volunteered to be the CNA. Heck, it's easier to report a problem than to fix it.

It really burns my butt when nurses feel they are too good to assist with ADLs.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

As long as I was getting RN wages, I worked wherever they put me. Easy peasy. The only time I ever had an issue with it was when I gave notice at this one nursing home, and the administrator made me work as an aide during those last two weeks to punish me for quitting.

Leader25, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 37 years experience.

Whoa, what is going on here,I would rather go home.Once they pop your cherry that way you will always be given that "option".Does the nurse manager get downgraded whenever they are short?Does the CEO get downgraded to housekeeping?If this is something you like to do ,go ahead, but you can not tell me there will not be future fallout that affects you and the nurses up and coming.

4 hours doing CNA work while earning RN pay? Sign me up.

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 39 years experience.

4 hours doing CNA work while earning RN pay? Sign me up.

I'm with you. There is no such thing as "CNA work". It's the aspect of nursing work that can safely be delegated. It is not beneath any nurse to do it. If I still get RN wages while occupying a role with lesser responsibility, I'm in.

Penelope_Pitstop, BSN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

I'm with you. There is no such thing as "CNA work". It's the aspect of nursing work that can safely be delegated. It is not beneath any nurse to do it. If I still get RN wages while occupying a role with lesser responsibility, I'm in.

Dis.

Y'all do realize that if the nurse:patient ratio thing becomes a reality far and wide, primary nursing will be the go-to, yes?

Why is everyone who is objecting to this objecting? Can't handle it? So why do you think you're above doing it?

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Dis.

Y'all do realize that if the nurse:patient ratio thing becomes a reality far and wide, primary nursing will be the go-to, yes?

Why is everyone who is objecting to this objecting? Can't handle it? So why do you think you're above doing it?

I don't mind "being the CNA" on occasion, but primary nursing is not quite the same thing as your co-workers suddenly becoming your supervisors and delegating tasks to you. In fact, it might be more fair to give each nurse fewer patients and let them work together to accomplish what they need to. Some of the best nights I've had were nights where every RN had 2-3 patients (in med/surge) and we had no CNAs ...even when the patients were very heavy.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 28 years experience.

I think it's good for overall work morale and rapport. It helps you become more in tune with what the routine and expectations are for your ancillary staff co-workers. Also, it's a real "back to basics" nursing care experience.

Penelope_Pitstop, BSN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

I don't mind "being the CNA" on occasion, but primary nursing is not quite the same thing as your co-workers suddenly becoming your supervisors and delegating tasks to you. In fact, it might be more fair to give each nurse fewer patients and let them work together to accomplish what they need to. Some of the best nights I've had were nights where every RN had 2-3 patients (in med/surge) and we had no CNAs ...even when the patients were very heavy.

I see your point there. I guess in my experience when I've been utilized as designated assistive personnel I have not been treated any differently. But sadly, I feel a lot of our fellow nurses do abhor this for the duties themselves.