What's with all this disciplinary action?????

  1. It seems like the medical community just dumps on nurses who makes mistakes.
    A common topic on these forums is "I got wrote up" and "I got fired/asked to resign".

    I have never heard of anyone getting wrote up in the lab because of a mistake. If someone makes a mistake in the lab a swarm of people will jump in and correct it to insure the pt doesn't get false results and all is well. People are human and people make mistakes. We are never yelled at or wrote up. The only mistake I know the lab will fire you for is doing a type & cross on the wrong pt.

    Do nurse manangers get prizes for writing people up? Not saying that lab manangers are soft or skilled in cover-ups..........but they look out for their people.
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    About Laboratorian

    Joined: Dec '09; Posts: 132; Likes: 154
    Microbiology Lab Rat; from US
    Specialty: 13 year(s) of experience

    13 Comments

  3. by   Esme12
    It's a complete answer. Right now there is a plethora of nurses so when there are many applicants for one position administration is more likely to take action as there is another person waiting for your job. Second, when it comes to mistakes nurses are the "corrective action" taken to appease the governing bodies and families witha younger cheaper model.
  4. by   xoemmylouox
    We are the easiest to blame/throw under the bus it seems.. I agree it is prob. related to the fact that there are a TON of nurses and only a FEW jobs to go around..
  5. by   HouTx
    If you work with your organization's group that addresses incident reports (Safety, Quality, or whatever) you soon become aware that all departments are involved in the incident reporting process. Everyone makes mistakes. However, it just so happens that hospitals are all about nursing..... if patients did not need continuous nursing care, they would be treated in an alternative (less expensive) setting.

    So - since nurses make up the majority of clinical employees, it is only natural that they report more incidents. The problem lies in how the incidents are treated. Most organizations have a purely punitive approach & this is not only horrible for the people involved, but it does not have any positive effect on patient safety or clinical quality.

    The best outcomes are achieved with a "Just Culture" approach which focuses on the behavioral choices rather than the outcomes. It is systematic. Follow up actions are geared toward correcting the behavior or circumstance that lead up to the error. If you are ever offered a job in an organization that has adopted this approach - grab it!!
  6. by   Rose_Queen
    There is probably quite a few reasons for this, and the fact that there is no shortage of willing bodies to fill vacancies may be the main one here. However, this is a discussion board where we are given only one side of the story- and quite possibly not ALL of it. We may not have heard of the multiple disciplinary actions/discussions & remediation for other not-so-safe care. We are getting what the person wants us to hear which may not necessarily be the truth and/or whole story.
  7. by   OCNRN63
    It's an employer's market.
  8. by   tokmom
    Good nurse makes mistake and she gets fired. Bad nurse makes mistakes and nothing ever seems to happen to them.
  9. by   dlrrn2010
    being wrote up is rampant where i work...i get that they want to make a point so it doesn't happen again and again...but what happened to communication and as you said, we are human and make mistakes.....once a resident had a bruise on their hand from a caregiver holding her wrist too tight when she was combative and my managers comment was "it was an accident'...well so was the wrong strength i gave the resident (for example) but it was till a med error and i got wrote up....what happened to team work...everyone trying to get everyone else in trouble where i work is frustrating
  10. by   diligent-trooper
    Quote from poetnyouknowit
    There is probably quite a few reasons for this, and the fact that there is no shortage of willing bodies to fill vacancies may be the main one here. However, this is a discussion board where we are given only one side of the story- and quite possibly not ALL of it. We may not have heard of the multiple disciplinary actions/discussions & remediation for other not-so-safe care. We are getting what the person wants us to hear which may not necessarily be the truth and/or whole story.
    This was my assumption too, that this person must have been on the radar for sometime, until it happened to myself. My work history was clean. No write-ups. Attendance was near 100%, I worked every holiday. I had been given extra responsibility around the facility, because I was dependable.
    One incident, and my work, my name was complete mud with the administration. My co-worker believed I got screwed.
  11. by   hiddencatRN
    You're more likely to see someone post about being written up than you are to see someone post about making a mistake, but everything turned out ok, so keep in mind that you might not be seeing a representative picture. I made an error once, which was caught by the nurse following me. That nurse filed an incident report, I was called in to management, asked what had happened, had the opportunity to explain myself, and was told to just be more careful. That was it. I think the worst thing that happened to me in that situation was the fact that I felt really bad and guilty about making a mistake, as no harm came to the patient but I stewed for a few days about the "what ifs?"

    Most of the things I've seen people get written up for in my department are not simple human mistakes or errors based on knowledge deficits but cutting corners and disregarding standards of care. I have seen those folks complain about the unfairness of management and how management has it in for them, when there really is an issue with the quality of their work.
  12. by   dishes
    I have been reading the results of disciplinary hearings for 25 years and I do not believe there has been an increase in the incidence of disciplinary action. I do believe there has seen an increase in public discussion about disciplinary action. The reasons there has been an increase in public discussions are probably related to nurses believing they are anonymous on the internet and nurses are not being educated about the legal aspects of complaints, disciplinary hearings, and fitness to practice investigations.
  13. by   diligent-trooper
    Quote from dishes
    I have been reading the results of disciplinary hearings for 25 years and I do not believe there has been an increase in the incidence of disciplinary action. I do believe there has seen an increase in public discussion about disciplinary action. The reasons there has been an increase in public discussions are probably related to nurses believing they are anonymous on the internet and nurses are not being educated about the legal aspects of complaints, disciplinary hearings, and fitness to practice investigations.
    I believe the original post is about individual facilities, and not official disciplinary hearing of BONs.
  14. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from laboratorian
    it seems like the medical community just dumps on nurses who makes mistakes.
    a common topic on these forums is "i got wrote up" and "i got fired/asked to resign".

    i have never heard of anyone getting wrote up in the lab because of a mistake. if someone makes a mistake in the lab a swarm of people will jump in and correct it to insure the pt doesn't get false results and all is well. people are human and people make mistakes. we are never yelled at or wrote up. the only mistake i know the lab will fire you for is doing a type & cross on the wrong pt.

    do nurse manangers get prizes for writing people up? not saying that lab manangers are soft or skilled in cover-ups..........but they look out for their people.

    this may be a common topic on the forums, but we really don't know the whole story. all we know is what the poster has chosen to share with us, and often the posters don't understand themselves why they were fired or asked to resign when someone else wasn't. even if they do understand they may minimize their own culpability while exaggerating someone else's -- either purposefully or because that's the way it seems to them.

    my husband is in a position to participate in disciplinary hearings/meetings between employees and management, etc. he tells me that what's changed is the forums that are available for folks to bemoan their fate on line -- allnurses,com, facebook, twitter, etc. and the culture has changed in that folks do take to the internet to complain about something that was once a fairly private matter.

    i believe a lot of the reason for these "surprise" write-ups or terminations is that people really do not understand how to function in the adult workplace or how they're doing at functioning as adult employees. (see the "fired for no reason" thread.) a new grad who has been told over and over that "overall, you're doing really well but you need to improve your time management, and i'd also like you to be able to tell me why you're giving each of those meds and whether that dose is high, low or abut average" hears "you're doing really well." (that's a culture change as well. when i was a new grad -- and yes, i do remember that far back quite vividly -- i would have heard "you're too slow and you have to study your meds a lot more.") time goes on, and the new grad continues to hear that she's doing well and completely misses (or glosses over) the message about time managment and studying meds. nothing changes and suddenly she's shocked and betrayed by a meeting with management where she's told "we hear you have issues with time management and that you don't know your meds." it comes as a complete surprise even though the preceptor thinks she's made it clear. now suddenly there's a deadline. the new grad has to shape up immediately or she's out of a job.

    at this point, it may be too late to fix the time managment and lack of knowledge base issues in the time frame allowed. the preceptor is frustrated because she's brought it up over and over . . . . always prefaced of course, by the "you're doing really well over all" because we were all taught that you have to lead with a postitive, or, better, at least three of them. for each negative. the orientee is frustrated because she heard that she was doing well . . . and the rest of the message didn't sink in. management is frustrated because they've invest so many weeks of orientation in an orientee who appears unlikely to succeed.

    people are human and they do make mistakes. no one knows that better than a nurse. we've all made mistakes. but sometimes being written up -- or not -- has more to do with what you do after you make the mistake or with a pattern of mistakes than it does with any one single episode.

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