How Often Will I Be On My Feet As A Nurse?

  1. Hi Everyone,

    I am a 27 year old law school grad who is totally fed up with the law/criminals and I am thinking about nursing school. However, I am used to basically sitting all day and wanted to know will I be on my feet for extended periods of time as a nurse that it may be a problem?

    If so, are there certain of nurses that are on their feet less, say a community nurse vs a staff nurse?


    Thanks
  2. Visit akissbytheseine profile page

    About akissbytheseine

    Joined: Jan '05; Posts: 4

    39 Comments

  3. by   z's playa
    Sorry...I giggled when I saw the title of your thread......

    I personally think that any type of nursing in a hospital will require long periods of time walking, running, until you're crawling....

    The only type of nursing that requires little to no foot work is research nursing from what I can tell so far but i'm not in the field yet.
  4. by   canoehead
    If you are a nurse....well, I'm thinking this is not the career for you.

    When we say that sometimes we don't have a chance to pee in 12 hours, it's NOT exaggerating.
  5. by   JVanRN
    lol....
  6. by   BittyBabyGrower
    First off, when you hit clinicals, you are going to be running, then when you are a new grad, you will be running. Even our research nurses do a lot of running as they are all over the hospital usually.


    If you don't want to be on your feet, stay being a lawyer.
  7. by   JVanRN
    yeah...now that I work in an ICU setting...I dont' walk around quite as much as much as I did on the floor (up the hall, down the hall 1 mile each way)...but still tons of standing...to me that can be worse.
  8. by   begalli
    On Friday, I would say that at least 15 of the 16 hours I worked (4 voluntary overtime) I was on my feet. NO exaggeration. Today is Sunday and I'm still recovering.

    In my ICU it really depends on your assignment. Some can sit for the majority of their shift while others run all shift. I'm usually a runner and actually prefer it that way.
  9. by   ernurse728
    LOL...I too laughed a little when I read the post. I am an ED nurse who works 12 hr shifts. I can safely say that I am on my feet for probably 11 of 12 hrs that I work. It is crazy busy all the time and you literally hit the ground running as soon as you walk through the door. If I actually did get to sit for a minute I would be worried that something awful was going to happen! The classic calm before the storm!
  10. by   meownsmile
    I chuckled at this question too. Sorry, but i just came off 12 and if my butt saw a chair today it was as i walked by. I'd say if you spent time getting your degree in law, just find another category of law to practice. It's not worth going through the abuse your body will go through if youve already accomplished completing law school.
    For sure they pay is better in your field than ours.
  11. by   KrisRNwannabe
    well....let's see most nurses work 12 hour shifts. so out of your 12 hour shift you will probably be on your feet 13!!!! that is why i changed careers. my big (and i mean big!!) ol' butt needed to be out of that chair. I would rather be on my feet for 12 than staring at a computer for what seems like an eternity but really only 8 hours!!!!
  12. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from akissbytheseine
    Hi Everyone,

    I am a 27 year old law school grad who is totally fed up with the law/criminals and I am thinking about nursing school. However, I am used to basically sitting all day and wanted to know will I be on my feet for extended periods of time as a nurse that it may be a problem?

    If so, are there certain of nurses that are on their feet less, say a community nurse vs a staff nurse?


    Thanks
    I am a nursing student (RN), but here are some of my guesses:

    Phone triage nurses, probably.
    I know some psych nurses that what they do is phone responses to pts, so they sit a lot.
    Maybe some triage nurses.
    Some intraop nurses sit more than floor nurses, from what I've been able to discern (but not by much).
    Maybe some NICU, PICU, Peds--while feeding & playing.

    Personally, I spent 20 years behind a computer and I find I enjoy the physical activity of nursing; especially walking . I am 54, I have arthritis in the hips and knees (not constantly); am overweight and not in great physical condition--I still like it. Sometimes my feet are tired (after 7-8 hours); sometimes my arthritis flares up.

    NurseFirst
  13. by   NurseCard
    Hmmmm... I'm not sure how to chime in on this...

    There ARE ways that an RN degree can be used, that require a bit less running... for example, I live in Kentucky and there ARE desk jobs for RN's, but I'm sure even THOSE jobs require some degree of getting up and moving around! Plus, those jobs usually require one to complete at least three years in the clinical setting first.

    My advice is the same: find another way to use your law degree where perhaps you are having less direct contact with lawbreakers.
  14. by   nurseangel78
    I believe that I would much rather be on my feet for 8 or 12 hours than sitting at a computer for that length of time.

    I work in LTC on 8 hour shifts, I am on my feet at least 6-7 hours.

close