Dropping the "Nurse Card"? - page 5

I am very curious if any of you ever dropped the "Nurse" word to get you out of trouble? Myself and a couple of buddies are new recently hired nurses and we call each other on our way home after... Read More

  1. by   kbrn2002
    No funny stories here, I haven't been pulled over [knock on wood]! Wondering why your nurse buddy was caught talking on the cell phone though when there are so many reasonably priced hands free options on the market?
  2. by   kjb_lpn
    One thing I have pesonally noticed is the mutual respect law enforcement and nurses seem to have for one another.

    And of course - always remember - "It's the nurse that decides the size of the needle and the catheter." LOL
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Never have dropped the "nurse" card. I was stopped twice: once for an improper left turn (too sharp) and another for speeding. I was given a warning both times because I was polite, forthcoming and honest. Neither cop knew I was a nurse. Never occurred to me to tell them so.
  4. by   psu_213
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    once for an improper left turn (too sharp)
    You can actually get pulled over for this? While I would not pull the nurse card to try and get out of speeding ticket, I would pull it to get out of this one.
  5. by   Horseshoe
    It's one thing to benefit from some kind of unwritten professional courtesy code when pulled over. If it happens, consider yourself lucky. But the people saying that not only do they feel ENTITLED to speed or break traffic laws without consequences, but also insinuate that they would provide substandard care to an officer should they cross paths while working-unbelievably unethical.

    The sense of entitlement displayed by some is unbelievable.
  6. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from RNJay_
    It was not my intention to offend anyone with the title or come off as if what my friend did was acceptable. I did yell at him when he called back for the reason he was pulled over in the first place. Hope that makes you feel better.

    I meant for this thread to be about ANYTHING that got you "special" treatment for dropping your career choice...NOT just for being pulled over.
    I thought the original thread title was meant to be clickbait as that word is quite inflammatory. I think it was appropriate for the mods to change it.

    I've never been the beneficiary of special treatment due to being a nurse, other than being seen quicker (or family members being seen quicker)in the ER where I worked. Then again, the last time I was ever pulled over was in 1990, before I became a nurse. After spending 8 boring hours taking defensive driving in order to dismiss the ticket, I decided to ditch the lead foot. So I haven't had the opportunity to test this theory that being a nurse brings special privileges.
  7. by   Medic/Nurse
    I guess, in hindsight, I have never outright NEVER dropped the NURSE card.

    The VIRGINIA STATE POLICE trooper asked what I was doing in the state (besides breaking the law) and, frankly, I think, discretion (and that Yellow Hummer) kept me from going to jail. Plus, I just can't lie, I have that curse.

    Or maybe it was just the PARAMEDIC CARD. I'm always dropping that one!

  8. by   Medic/Nurse
    Truthfully, I'm now trying to think (given that there is criticism of privilege) and I have started to check myself on traffic stops.

    1. I tended to drive reasonably.

    2. If I was stopped or hit a traffic checkpoint I was always courteous. Interior lights on, hands above 10 & 2 & stationary. Music off.

    Other than that, I'm honest if asked questions. There is nothing discernible on any vehicle about nursing or EMS.

    Yes, I drive/drove late model vehicles, well-maintained, I'm white, reasonably attractive on a good day, strawberry blond with boobs.

    I'm not sure the NURSE variable mattered. The ONLY 2 tickets I got my entire life were while wearing a FLIGHT SUIT on my way to work within 10 miles of what (yep, I know the 25 mph coming out of downtown speed trap - but, he could have showed discretion) I thought was the posted speed I was a fuzz over 40 in a 35 -- NOPE!!! and the other merging onto actual INTERSTATE MOVING HEAVY TRAFFIC at the ENTRANCE RAMP.

    80 in 70
    43 in 25 but I thought it was a 35 (I was surprised I was 43) - full story in earlier post.

    I think the car got too much attention. Really. Never buy a flashy car, kids. Folks would walk over to look at her, when I was getting gas kind of flashy - this will get you tickets. I had driven close to a MILLION miles without a ticket at that point. Boom.

    And no, being a nurse, or paramedic meant exactly nothing. I had a FLIGHTSUIT. Told them where I was going. Had a name badge on as big as my hand they could not miss on my Left chest with Critical Care Nurse/Paramedic on it. Yep, doesn't take a Detective to figure that out.

    And, yep, those officers knew that my smiling face could be the last thing they ever looked at before they hit the big black abyss of the unknown. Really.

    So, get it over it folks, if you're offended at this thread. It's a meaningless exercise.

    No QUID PRO QUO exists. Ever.

    Carry on.

  9. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from Horseshoe
    It's one thing to benefit from some kind of unwritten professional courtesy code when pulled over. If it happens, consider yourself lucky. But the people saying that not only do they feel ENTITLED to speed or break traffic laws without consequences, but also insinuate that they would provide substandard care to an officer should they cross paths while working-unbelievably unethical.

    The sense of entitlement displayed by some is unbelievable.
    I think the respose about the catheter or IV was purely tongue in cheek. Can you really imagine anyone actually saying or doing that? I can't. This forum is for posting fun, funny and ireverant stuff as well as asking for information and support.

    Just my .02
  10. by   NewRN'16
    Cops is my area do not care if you are "a nurse". I got in trouble 2 blocks from my house , and me being a nurse meant squad to them.
  11. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    I think the respose about the catheter or IV was purely tongue in cheek. Can you really imagine anyone actually saying or doing that? I can't. This forum is for posting fun, funny and ireverant stuff as well as asking for information and support.

    Just my .02
    Nope, I've seen it again and again on AN. Most nurses count their lucky stars if they get out of a ticket for being a nurse. Others consider it their RIGHT and get very ticked off if a cop doesn't give them their due, and these kinds of comments typically follow.
  12. by   curious nature
    I was really tired after a double shift, and I was pulled over for going 5 miles over in a school zone (kids not yet out of school, but still), and the officer let me go with a warning after asking me where I was going (to post office, then home) and where I worked. I was so grateful! Not usually a speeder, just really tired. It's never happened again!!
  13. by   triciam888
    Once when I got a speeding ticket I was told by the cop that if she had known I was a nurse then she would not have written me a ticket. I mentioned it somehow after the ticket was written. I think I might have thanked her for doing her job ! There used to be a professional courtesy thing between those in the help professions. Docs used to see nurses for free. When I worked in a NICU, I could take my child to work and the docs would see them free or you could run by their house and they would check them out. Many ear infections were treated on week-ends by our neonatologists!

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