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Exit interview survey, tell the truth, lie or ignore

Nurses   (2,211 Views 47 Comments)
by Forest2 Forest2 (Member)

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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21 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

I usually ignore surveys and polls from employers, past and present, as there is no way to guarantee anonymity and one never knows how the retaliation bug will bite.

a previous employer of mine used the tactic of saying that it's anonymous, but there is a scan bar at the bottom so that they know who answers what.  They used to mail cards in envelopes to give the appearance that it was anonymous, then laugh at people openly, or get shocked when their "golden ones" wrote bad stuff...I never answered.  They'd also asked why I hadn't sent mine in...how did they know if it was anonymous.  Everyone caught on quick enough and that stopped after a few years

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2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

On one hand I want to put it all behind me.  It's just that what I saw and knew were taking place keep running through my mind. Everything looks good on paper though. I'm not bitter but I have trouble sleeping at times thinking about it.

I've decided it is best not to answer.  If I can't say anything good then I won't say anything.  I don't need any trouble and it wouldn't help anyway.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

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8 hours ago, Forest2 said:

 I would like to answer it with brutal honesty, but I don't think it's a good idea. 

As Walter Brennan said in the old TV series "The Guns of Will Sonnet":

"No brag, just fact."

I am brutally honest, to the very best of my ability, all the time. Case in point: I was called down to HR, and written up, over 2 years ago by the director of the psych division for not filling out some superfluous, redundant POS paperwork. I was brutally honest and confronted  both directors on their behaviors and have not been bothered by either one since.

Richard Bach wrote, "Live never to be ashamed of anything you do or say is published around the world- even if what is published is not true".

I try to live by those words.

My vote is to be brutally honest. So what and big deal if someone does or doesn't read them. The process is one hell of a catharsis.

The best to you, Forest2. Good topic.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

14 Followers; 1 Article; 75,863 Visitors; 6,121 Posts

24 minutes ago, Forest2 said:

I've decided it is best not to answer.  If I can't say anything good then I won't say anything.  I don't need any trouble and it wouldn't help anyway.

I read this after I posted and support your decision, Forest2.

One reason why I journal is because I can say or draw anything I want without worry of repercussion. And, like I said before, "it's one hell of a catharsis".

In fact, many times when I'm drafting a professional letter or email, I'll write or type exactly what I would like to say and then go back and edit it for appropriate/professional correspondence.

That, too, is a great catharsis!

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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I recommend completing an exit interview, if nothing else but to NOT allow TPTB claim that I (you) ignored the chance to clear the air.

However, like most other posters, be super careful about anything that could be construed as negative.  Just nod, 'Hmm, Hmm', 'yes', 'not what you thought' , etc. Better to be low keyed than to have something come back and bite you in the tush.

If the problems you experienced are so serious,  prob little will be done to remedy them. Afterall, it is those folk already have some knowledge about them.

And like others have said, there is no anonymity. Nsg is a small world and word travels around FAST. In the future, you may need them for some clarification (your SS# should come up somewhere for payroll record keeping). You don't want to p*ss them off. 

If your conscience or need to 'mandate report' something, maybe go thru your state Ombudsman Office or the state DOH. But again, I worry about anonymity. 'Been there and done that' when as dept heads it was easy for us to figure out who had just quit and prob called in a report.

You were only there 6 days, so they prob don't expect too much negativity.

PLAY IT SAFE.

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benharold1 has 35 years experience as a BSN.

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I changed my work status and just filled an exit survey out

I mainly spoke of generalities such as more flexible schedule and shorter schedule options and providing true uninterrupted breaks for staff.  I did not attack my manager even though my relationship has not always beengreat

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SummerGarden has 10 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in ED and Acute Care.

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OP:  One time I was forced to go to an exit interview in-person prior to leaving on my last day.  I did not talk about anything other than what I liked about the job.  Plus, I only filled out one exit interview survey that I was brutally honest and it was because I will ever need to work in that environment ever again.  Otherwise, I ignore exit interview surveys in the mail or over the phone for the same reasons others posted.  I do not think exit interviews are helpful to you or anyone else unless there is a third party conducting the interview and there is little to no chance the interview will be held against you later on.  Good luck.

Edited by SummerGarden

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8,991 Visitors; 700 Posts

I won’t fill those out, it’s too little too late.

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NightNerd has 5 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN.

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I just did one of these yesterday! I think it's all in how you word it. Had I completed the survey my last day at that job, it would have been useless because I would have been venting. There was a delay in me getting the form, so by the time I filled it out I was ready to be constructive. It was online and supposedly anonymous, but I never trust that and would never say anything that I wouldn't stand by later. I have no doubt my carefully expressed thoughts will be immediately and thoroughly ignored, but at least I tried.

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Trust me, they know why you are leaving. If they cared, the problem would already be fixed.

I had a good time though. I told them I was leaving for double the salary, which they knew was true.

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L-ICURN has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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You'll do right by withholding negativity because former employers can be vengeful creatures. We should be able to tell the truth about toxic people, staffing ratios, and the like. However, management rarely wants to hear when they're failing.

I dream of one day telling 2 HR reps off. Until that day comes, I bite my tongue.

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2 Followers; 6,363 Visitors; 1,220 Posts

I ran into a couple of HR people I honestly think were mentally ill.

Move on. Don't try to figure it out. You won't

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