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Change from software to NP

Students   (444 Views | 11 Replies)
by MayaSwiss MayaSwiss (New) New Pre-Student

MayaSwiss specializes in NA.

49 Profile Views; 1 Post

Hi all

I need an advice and help on how to try this.

I am a mom of 2, 40 years old, working as an engineer here for 12 years, and now thinking about transitioning to a medical job, which was my dream for years.

Please provide some advice on where and how to start.

I cant go back as a full time student as i need to work for family, but thinking of being part time student, take some course and plan for the next few years to make a switch. 

please advice and provide help on best way to approach.

Thank you!!

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MountaineerFan57 is a BSN and specializes in Critical Care/CVICU.

31 Posts; 818 Profile Views

To become an NP, you first would have to get a bachelors of science in nursing (BSN). If you have to work, your best bet will probably be to apply to an assosciates degree program (ADN). In my area it is common for community colleges to offer part time and night/weekend programs. 
After your ADN is complete, you could take NCLEX and start working as a nurse While you finish your BSN. There are lots of schools that offer this online. 
After you finish your BSN, you would be able to apply for NP programs, which are masters or doctorate programs. 
Good luck on your journey!  

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

6 Followers; 2 Articles; 960 Posts; 8,585 Profile Views

I also switched from high tech.  First thing is to get your nursing prereq's done.  Research what is required and start taking these classes.  You can do this part time.  Good luck.

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33 Posts; 735 Profile Views

do an ABSN and then get your MSN. you can't be an NP without first getting your bachelors in nursing 

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56 Posts; 682 Profile Views

I've been on this path for a couple years now -- also a mom, 43, leaving an unrelated career. Community college has been an awesome transition opportunity. I still work part-time and take a class or two each semester at night. But they are meaty classes with labs (e.g. a&p) where studying almost a full-time job in itself. Coming from a creative field, simply learning *how* to study science has been a huge thing for me to figure out, so as an engineer you probably have the kind of brain that gives you an edge on this. If your kids are still young, as mine are, juggling their expectations/schedule with your spouse and household will also take some figuring out that can take time and have many ups and downs.

Maybe it's where I live, but it kinda surprised me that getting into the community college nursing program is actually more competitive than some of the more elite BSN programs.  Everyone is trying to make As and things get pretty intense (though non-science pre-requisites like psychology have been insanely easy and most people in those classes are half-asleep).

Be sure to go to open houses for nursing schools and start making a spreadsheet of pre-requisites of each (there may be some differences, which can be frustrating if applying to several!). Just be open to jumping in and meeting people in your classes, ask them about their path too. Many are probably currently in the medical field as LPNs or similar, and have great insights. That's helped me way more than school advisors and stuff. Also, it can be very affirming to meet other "mature" students and develop a bond.

Anyway, best of luck! I'm currently waiting to hear back from nursing programs after finishing my pre-requisites and never thought I'd even make it this far. But it's been such a fantastic experience that's really energized me and made me excited about the future -- especially after kinda petering out in a career that made me feel "old", unappreciated, etc, at this point in my life. 

 

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447 Posts; 2,116 Profile Views

8 hours ago, nursetobequestionmark said:

do an ABSN and then get your MSN. you can't be an NP without first getting your bachelors in nursing 

I'd make sure to talk to program advisers before committing to any classes.  ABSN is going to be very rapid, so is ADN, but a traditional BSN might cost more and limit your eligibility for grants since you're transferring credits instead of a normal full time schedule.  All of this has to be weighed against your home life and how you're paying for school, and how difficult that school is.  Some only teach what you need to get your license and some expect you to know enough about treatment that switching to med school would be incredibly easy for you.

All 3 paths you can take have their advantages and disadvantages.  You need to figure out which one is going to put the least stress on balancing your home life and money.

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418 Posts; 1,210 Profile Views

The first thing to do is to talk to a nursing counselor at a local community college AND university.  Know your options, which might be ABSN, or ADN>BSN>MSN.  Find out how competitive your local nursing schools are and what kind of background/grades you will need to get in.  Ask how long it takes for students to get accepted into RN school in your area.  I have a friend that's been trying to get in for over a year (and has applied to several schools!).

Some people will probably tell you that they worked full time during school, but it is highly doubtful that you will be able to work full time during an RN program (usually about 2 years).  If you work FT while taking prerequisites, and only take a class or 2 at a time, it will take you a long time just to finish the prereqs. 

If you have no healthcare experience, I always recommend taking a CNA class to get your feet wet and see if it's even something you really want to invest many years on.

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53 Posts; 675 Profile Views

I agree with taking a CNA class and picking up a per diem job to see if it is what you want and this also can give you exposure to NPs, who may let you shadow when you are not on shift.

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DowntheRiver has 5 years experience and specializes in Urgent Care, Oncology.

896 Posts; 14,008 Profile Views

There are a few direct entry MSN programs but I don't think any of them are part time and they're pretty rigorous. 

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211 Posts; 4,478 Profile Views

On 12/14/2019 at 1:04 PM, MayaSwiss said:

Hi all

I need an advice and help on how to try this.

I am a mom of 2, 40 years old, working as an engineer here for 12 years, and now thinking about transitioning to a medical job, which was my dream for years.

Please provide some advice on where and how to start.

I cant go back as a full time student as i need to work for family, but thinking of being part time student, take some course and plan for the next few years to make a switch. 

please advice and provide help on best way to approach.

Thank you!!

Best wishes on your journey.  I think if you are wanting to go directly into a provider role you would be better served becoming a physician assistant.   the NP role was truly created for experienced nurses to advance and move into as their competence increased.   

I am a NP and a 2nd degree student.  I started with an accelerated BSN program.   This is really the only way to go IMHO if you want to be an advanced practice nurse and are on a time crunch.   you will graduate with a BSN in a year(after first probably taking a year of pre-reqs)  instead of messing around to get into community college and then still having to go finish your bachelors. 

These programs definitely won't allow you to continue to work full time.    Even in traditional programs there is this illusion that nursing can be done while working full time.  I can tell you, it can certainly be done, but it will be through blood, sweat, tears, and sacrifice.  It's a hard path.  Good luck on whatever you decide

 

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1 Article; 164 Posts; 3,823 Profile Views

probably 1-2 years of prereqs based on how many credits you take each semester, then another 2 years (unless you do a ABSN program) of nursing school, then work as a nurse for 3-4 years, then apply to NP program and work part time and finish it in 2-3 years...…..are you sure you wanna do all of that?

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,677 Posts; 3,539 Profile Views

Prior to starting your journey, look to see the true need in your area for NPs if that is the route that you wish to go.  Many areas are getting saturated and new grads are needing to move to less desirable areas for that 1 year of experience.  If you are a mom with other obligations, that may not be a realistic situation for you.  There are many threads on here if you look.  Good luck on your journey!

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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