Can't pass HESI, but graduated

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So I was not able to pass HESI by a few points. However, I technically graduated from my program. If I take nclex and pass, will the fact that my transcripts will say incomplete hurt me when I look for a job or decide to go for my RN?

elkpark

14,633 Posts

What do you mean by "technically graduated"? Will you even be able to take the NCLEX? AFAIK, all states require that you must be a graduate of an approved nursing program, and your school defines what "graduate" means. If the program requires you pass the HESI as a condition of graduation and you haven't passed it, your school won't submit the necessary documentation to the BON to make you eligible for licensure.

Has 21 years experience.
What do you mean by "technically graduated"? Will you even be able to take the NCLEX? AFAIK, all states require that you must be a graduate of an approved nursing program, and your school defines what "graduate" means. If the program requires you pass the HESI as a condition of graduation and you haven't passed it, your school won't submit the necessary documentation to the BON to make you eligible for licensure.

This is my understanding too. I went to a school that required a specific HESI score for Med/Surg and for the exit. If the student failed the first HESI but was otherwise passing the course they would get another attempt to score the raw score needed to move on, or if the exit test, graduate. If successful, then the grade in the books stayed and they passed. If they were unsuccessful, then they received an incomplete and would have to remediate for the next term. I'm not sure what the end process is, but I'm pretty sure after remediation was done then the student would be expected to test again and pass. The Incomplete was only to save them for paying for the tuition again and retaking the entire term since their overall score on everything else was passing.

OP, definitely check with your school and find out if for sure you have graduated before you pay for the NCLEX registration and Pearson VUE testing fees.

Kuriin, BSN, RN

967 Posts

Specializes in Emergency. Has 7 years experience.
So I was not able to pass HESI by a few points. However, I technically graduated from my program. If I take nclex and pass, will the fact that my transcripts will say incomplete hurt me when I look for a job or decide to go for my RN?

If your school requires an exit HESI (or any other exit exam) in order to graduate, then you technically did not "graduate". How do you propose giving your diploma to your future employer if you didn't graduate? Not to mention, you will never receive your NCLEX results until you graduate.

NICUmiiki, DNP, NP

1,774 Posts

Specializes in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Has 8 years experience.

I don't think a board of nursing will let you take the NCLEX if your transcript says incomplete.

Kuriin, BSN, RN

967 Posts

Specializes in Emergency. Has 7 years experience.

The BRN (at least in California) only requires the roster from the school that shows they are ELIGIBLE to graduate. In order to receive the results and license, you must have shown that you have graduated (transcripts).

Mursedoc2b

7 Posts

I too, grad. from a BSN program that requires you to take and pass the HESI with a min. score that is chosen by the school on the national avg I believe. Anyway, it was a min. score of 900. We had two chances. My first attempt was not successful but my second time was. They do this to kind of cover their butts as far as the NCLEX goes. The school has to maintain a min. % of first time passers to keep accredited. Which I think is really stupid, but it is what it is. You can't change the system, you work with it or around it right? I think HESI questions are more technical and harder then NCLEX question for a reason. They want to see if you are prepared to take the NCLEX and pass it. No Schools are not allowed to "Gate" test students in most states. But they are however allowed to give you a exit HESI as part of your school final grade. I think all school should do this if not already doing so, not just for the benefit of the school but also for the student. I really don't know what "technically" passed is to be honest. Because at my school you would have "technically" failed and would have taken a semester over again. And As stated above in other replies, I know the state has to get the 'OK" from your school that you have passed all of your classes in order to sit for the NCLEX.

jtboy29

216 Posts

Was the HESI a requirement for you to graduate? Like most nursing programs around the country, passing the Exit HESI with the set requirement whether it be an 850 or 900 is a graduation requirement. You can be passing the term/semester however you fail the Exit HESI you automatically fail and have to repeat the term. My example is, I was passing my final term of Nursing school (LVN) with an 82 and just because I missed passing by one point I automatically do not graduate and have to repeat the term.

grnfld86

16 Posts

All public nursing school curriculum needs to be approved and accredited by the appropriate state dept of education, state board of nursing, andor whatever additional bodies they choose. Elsevier does not have any state board accreditation. In fact, the ONLY accreditation they have is from the AACN in Continuing Edication. In short, no, a public nursing school can not deny your graduation based on HESI. A lot of states even have laws or rules against nursing programs denying graduation due to a standardized test. Unfortunately, a lot of public nursing schools feel pressure to keep their NCLEX passing rates up and only do this test so that they don't look bad. If a public nursing school does this to ANYONE and you're school isn't listening, hire a civil attorney and make a formal complaint to the respective dept of education and board of nursing.

grnfld86

16 Posts

All public nursing school curriculum needs to be approved and accredited by the appropriate state dept of education, state board of nursing, andor whatever additional bodies they choose. Elsevier does not have any state board accreditation. In fact, the ONLY accreditation they have is from the AACN in Continuing Edication. In short, no, a public nursing school can not deny your graduation based on HESI. A lot of states even have laws or rules against nursing programs denying graduation due to a standardized test. Unfortunately, a lot of public nursing schools feel pressure to keep their NCLEX passing rates up and only do this test so that they don't look bad. If a public nursing school does this to ANYONE and you're school isn't listening, hire a civil attorney and make a formal complaint to the respective dept of education and board of nursing.

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 46 years experience.
All public nursing school curriculum needs to be approved and accredited by the appropriate state dept of education, state board of nursing, andor whatever additional bodies they choose. Elsevier does not have any state board accreditation. In fact, the ONLY accreditation they have is from the AACN in Continuing Edication. In short, no, a public nursing school can not deny your graduation based on HESI. A lot of states even have laws or rules against nursing programs denying graduation due to a standardized test. Unfortunately, a lot of public nursing schools feel pressure to keep their NCLEX passing rates up and only do this test so that they don't look bad. If a public nursing school does this to ANYONE and you're school isn't listening, hire a civil attorney and make a formal complaint to the respective dept of education and board of nursing.

Incorrect on several points. HESI is a tool. Schools get to determine their curriculum and how they will use tools such as HESI therein. If the graduation policy is such that you must pass the HESI to graduate, then it goes without saying that YOU MUST PASS THE HESI TO GRADUATE.

A civil attorney will just take more of your money. There is no case here that is winnable.

grnfld86

16 Posts

HESI is a tool, I agree. However, all public nursing school curriculum must be approved by governing laws and rules by the state system and the accrediting group. Just as an example, the state of Texas has a rule not allowing a standardized test to prevent a student from graduating. Curriculum cannot be changed at the will of a public nursing school. That is one of the factors that is taken into account for the school to get their accreditation and approval. HESI, or Elsevier, is not even accredited by any board of nursing or state system. In fact, the NLN advises against determining a students graduation using a standardized test. Perhaps a private school can set their own restrictions, but a public school cannot. If the student meets minimum outcomes on goals, outcome, and APPROVED curriculum, the student must be given their degree. Just as an example, what accreditation agency is approving a minimum score to graduate? None. Elsevier lacks the necessary approval and accreditation to be used as a graduation requirement. I just looked at the Indiana Board of Nursing, and they have no requirement to meet a certain score in HESI to qualify for graduation.