80% BSN by 2020: Where Are We Now?

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Specializes in Clinical Leadership, Staff Development, Education. Has 29 years experience.

In 2010, the 80% BSN by 2020 initiative rolled out in an effort to boost nursing’s competency level.  Have we reach the 80% goal?   Read on to find out if we’ve made progress over the past 10 years. You are reading page 3 of 80% BSN by 2020: Where Are We Now?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Wuzzie

4,652 Posts

8 minutes ago, Undercat said:

The writing was on the wall in 1972 when I started BSN program so it's not like you didn't have enough notice to pick your degree up until now.  IF a mandatory BSN would limit our numbers making us more valuable employees, we would all be better off.  ADN for LPN's might not be a bad idea either if it gave them more access to some of acute care jobs in less intensive settings.

Kinda harsh don't you think considering here we are 48 years later and it hasn't happened! Also, you've been around long enough to know that limiting our numbers has never made us more valuable. Nothing will really make us more valuable. Well maybe if we could bill for services. But insurance companies will not allow that. Hospitals pretty much find other ways to fill the holes by creating UAPs with glorified titles to do much of what we do. Heck, like I stated on another post we are still billed as part of the room charge. Having a BSN won't change that either. If so it would have happened by now. Don't get me wrong, I believe in BSN as entry to practice is probably the way to go simply so we have a leg to stand on. But, frankly, this ongoing debate Diploma vs ADN vs BSN is making me tired. 

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience. 4,487 Posts

The writing on the wall was a regional issue, I suspect. In job markets needing nurses, employers were just fine with ADN nurses, in some places this is probably still true.

Most of my classmates were career changers or had student debt and community college was the affordable option. The majority of us already had college educations.

Soloist, LPN

72 Posts

maybe slightly off topic but it seems like its getting harder to transition from LPN to RN... the colleges hardly take any LPN's and that leaves the sketchy online options generally... RN to BSN however... I could have gone virtually anywhere and lots of those options didn't even have a nursing program. 

Guest856929

486 Posts

I think BSN should be the minimum entry level for all nurses, especially in the acute care setting. Pharmacists, PTs, dieticians, SWs, STs etc. have all shifted from to be careers that are primarily professional rather than vocational. Along the way, they have garnered more respect. 

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 29 years experience. 3,311 Posts

1 hour ago, cynical-RN said:

I think BSN should be the minimum entry level for all nurses, especially in the acute care setting. Pharmacists, PTs, dieticians, SWs, STs etc. have all shifted from to be careers that are primarily professional rather than vocational. Along the way, they have garnered more respect. 

in some respects I agree.  But until hospital administration starts the ball rolling on respecting nurses instead of looking at nurses as patsies to throw under the bus when there are issues (that are created by said administrators), we won't have respect.  Currently, patients know and management can treat nursing staff like garbage and get away with it, because no one will have our backs

Guest856929

486 Posts

4 minutes ago, Hoosier_RN said:

in some respects I agree.  But until hospital administration starts the ball rolling on respecting nurses instead of looking at nurses as patsies to throw under the bus when there are issues (that are created by said administrators), we won't have respect.  Currently, patients know and management can treat nursing staff like garbage and get away with it, because no one will have our backs

Indeed. How can we remedy that? It is especially disappointing because some of the executives are in fact nurses. I guess the bottom line -money, matters more than camaraderie among nurses. Dog-eat-dog profession. Nurses are so replaceable and/or disposable, one would be mistaken to think that there is a shortage of RNs currently.  

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 29 years experience. 3,311 Posts

2 hours ago, cynical-RN said:

Indeed. How can we remedy that? It is especially disappointing because some of the executives are in fact nurses. I guess the bottom line -money, matters more than camaraderie among nurses. Dog-eat-dog profession. Nurses are so replaceable and/or disposable, one would be mistaken to think that there is a shortage of RNs currently.  

Just a shortage of experienced willing to put up with the nonsense!

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience. 307 Posts

9 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

Kinda harsh don't you think considering here we are 48 years later and it hasn't happened! Also, you've been around long enough to know that limiting our numbers has never made us more valuable. Nothing will really make us more valuable. Well maybe if we could bill for services. But insurance companies will not allow that. Hospitals pretty much find other ways to fill the holes by creating UAPs with glorified titles to do much of what we do. Heck, like I stated on another post we are still billed as part of the room charge. Having a BSN won't change that either. If so it would have happened by now. Don't get me wrong, I believe in BSN as entry to practice is probably the way to go simply so we have a leg to stand on. But, frankly, this ongoing debate Diploma vs ADN vs BSN is making me tired. 

I'm not adding to the ADN vs. BSN debate here but just saying that if you want to even have a job, one is more marketable with bachelor's.  Even back in the 70's, socialized medicine was on the horizon which meant that the better the piece of paper you had, the better prepared you were for the future.  I wouldn't even have gotten a job (where I wanted a job) in 1972 without the degree. 

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience. 7,771 Posts

17 hours ago, JKL33 said:

Interesting comments, Muno.

 

Well that and the fact that portion of curriculum found in BSN programs and "missing" in ADN programs just doesn't have jack to do with (better) assessing patients, making plans for their care, delivering their interventions in an appropriate manner and reevaluating their statuses. It has nothing to do with the nursing process as it applied at the bedside.

I realize this is my experience; my take on the situation. I would love to know if you can comment about whether there were any conversations about this in your experience on the task force/group in which you participated.

I firmly believe that the bridge programs prepare nurses to do "something else" [other than provide direct patient care]. There's nothing wrong with a certain portion of us wanting to do something besides provide direct care to patients. It's just that it all begs the question of why the focus of all of this had to be (or seemed to be) on nurses who love to care for patients--or why, if it was going to be about improving care at the bedside, it didn't result in a curriculum that focused on that.

I should add that the main hurdle to trying implement any changes was that there is no evidence to support what the specific factors are of a BSN degree that produce better outcomes.  It was ironic that one of the proposed benefits of a BSN was a better understanding of applied statistics, yet this initiative wasn't based on any evidence that makes it actionable, in other words, a pretty pathetic comprehension of applied statistics that come from not just BSN prepared researchers but doctoral level.  I admit it's a bit embarrassing as a nurse.  

Since the research didn't attempt to isolate the factors of a BSN education that produce better outcomes, we were left to guess.  Was it that BSN prepared nurses were more likely to have lived in dorms?  Was it that they paid more for their education?   Did more debt held by the nursing staff improve patient outcomes?  Our best guess was that if anything actually made a difference, maybe it was the curriculum.

It was hard to pinpoint exactly what part of a BSN curriculum ADN programs were lacking.  ADN programs were less likely to have a separate statistics course but were not less likely to integrate statistics and evidence based practice into their overall curriculum. 

I will admit that I held some unfair views on community college prepared nurses.  We initially assumed that having less University level general requirements may have played some role, but we were surprised to learn that ADN programs were far more likely to have students who had a previous bachelor's degree, with a couple of programs that had even made that a requirement.  So if more education is better it sort of makes you wonder why we allow 'only' BSNs to practice when ADN's often have more college level education.  

As to the content of RN to BSN programs, our representative from an in-state BSN program willingly admitted that their program is just a year of "busy work", but was also somewhat offensively open about that fact that her job was to bring in revenue, not do what's best for the profession of nursing.  

Wuzzie

4,652 Posts

Muno, I think I love you!

Txdude254

11 Posts

Thank you for this great article, explanation and breakdown with the nursing shortage not to mention the pandemic all nurses are needed more than ever. 

In my opinion I believe BSN curriculum's are geared more towards management while ADN curriculums are geared towards bedside nursing. I believe that's why some ADN nursing programs have more clinical experience and Hands-On training than BSN programs

 

 

BSN-to-MSN, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in SCRN. Has 8 years experience. 398 Posts

I am getting a BSN right now, will be done in August. I think it is worth it. I did see lots of BSN praising in the program: BSN is better prepared to do this, BSN is better prepared to do that. The program seemed to look down on ADNs. Whatever.

I think employers mandating BSN in 5 years upon hire is fair, together with tuition reimbursement it promotes further learning.