80% BSN by 2020: Where Are We Now?

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Specializes in Clinical Leadership, Staff Development, Education. Has 29 years experience.

In 2010, the 80% BSN by 2020 initiative rolled out in an effort to boost nursing’s competency level.  Have we reach the 80% goal?   Read on to find out if we’ve made progress over the past 10 years. You are reading page 9 of 80% BSN by 2020: Where Are We Now?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience. 307 Posts

On 12/12/2020 at 10:58 AM, Jedrnurse said:

I'm genuinely confused as to how this relates to the central theme of the post. I thought it was about whether the push for RNs to have a BSN was being achieved.

How are LPNs a part of the solution? Or are you addressing a different problem?

Wouldn't LPN'S be up and running as BSN'S more quickly than high school grad? 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,622 Posts

3 hours ago, Undercat said:

Wouldn't LPN'S be up and running as BSN'S more quickly than high school grad? 

No doubt. It sounds like you're talking about an LPN to RN bridge program, although most of the ones I've seen over the years are at the ASN level, so it wouldn't immediately address the 80% by 2020 issue brought up by the OP.

Given the long, LONG history of this "goal" I think the only way of forcing it to happen is to streamline the requirement for NCLEX and make it be a BSN. ASN programs could be refocused to prepare candidates to sit for the NCLEX-PN exam.

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience. 307 Posts

Jedmore:  I completely agree with two board exams and elevating LPN to ADN programs.  However, I also think about the ADN program become an RN program for medsurg only so that graduates could work on the floors while getting their courses in the specialties and finishing liberal arts requirements.  This would (IMHO) allow students to graduate with BSN without a lot of debt. At that time, they would also take BSN boards. 

MunoRN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience. 7,771 Posts

1 hour ago, Jedrnurse said:

No doubt. It sounds like you're talking about an LPN to RN bridge program, although most of the ones I've seen over the years are at the ASN level, so it wouldn't immediately address the 80% by 2020 issue brought up by the OP.

Given the long, LONG history of this "goal" I think the only way of forcing it to happen is to streamline the requirement for NCLEX and make it be a BSN. ASN programs could be refocused to prepare candidates to sit for the NCLEX-PN exam.

I'm not following how that would help move us forward rather than backwards.

This only puts about half of our current RN graduates even farther from a BSN degree.

Also, converting all current ADN programs to LPN programs would cut the output of RNs in about half, while this might create a market favorable to RNs for a short period of time, the lack of RNs would allow hospitals to justify elevating LPNs to the role currently occupied by RNs, and quite possibly some amount of paycut as well.  A relatively small percentage of BSNs could occupy 'specialty' jobs; case management, research, etc. But most would be now stuck taking the jobs they had before (direct patient care) but at reduced pay.  

I'm really not sure how that isn't just a really horrible idea for Nursing.

10 minutes ago, Undercat said:

Jedmore:  I completely agree with two board exams and elevating LPN to ADN programs.  However, I also think about the ADN program become an RN program for medsurg only so that graduates could work on the floors while getting their courses in the specialties and finishing liberal arts requirements.  This would (IMHO) allow students to graduate with BSN without a lot of debt. At that time, they would also take BSN boards. 

What would "their courses in the specialties" be?

Guest856929

486 Posts

On 12/12/2020 at 8:51 AM, Squeamish BBA LPN said:

My LPN program was 18 months et was hospital-based. In 1989 LPNs were still working in ICU in Telemetry. 

In 1989

It is a new decade, century, and millennium

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience. 307 Posts

1 hour ago, MunoRN said:

I'm not following how that would help move us forward rather than backwards.

This only puts about half of our current RN graduates even farther from a BSN degree.

Also, converting all current ADN programs to LPN programs would cut the output of RNs in about half, while this might create a market favorable to RNs for a short period of time, the lack of RNs would allow hospitals to justify elevating LPNs to the role currently occupied by RNs, and quite possibly some amount of paycut as well.  A relatively small percentage of BSNs could occupy 'specialty' jobs; case management, research, etc. But most would be now stuck taking the jobs they had before (direct patient care) but at reduced pay.  

I'm really not sure how that isn't just a really horrible idea for Nursing.

What would "their courses in the specialties" be?

Peds, maternity, public health and what is all not adult med surg.  This may be an awful idea.  Im just trying to think out of the box how to get more nurses out working without big debts.  I guess we can never return to the old Columbia and Cornell models of a much cheaper 5 year program.  A student could get away with 2 years of pre nursing anywhere followed by a 3 year hospital program.  However, when I went for my interview at Cornell, everyone in the room had 4 year degees, but they technically only required 60 undergrad credits.  Minority friendly financial requirements.

But the two year ADN's would be med surg, SNF, LTC qualified.  Call them RN's if you want but the areas where they could work would be limited until they finish BSN.  They would be making nursing wages instead if CNA wages to pay for the extra 60 credits to get BSN.