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Found 26 results

  1. Joe V

    OMNE Scholarships

    The scholarship is provided for use by deserving nursing students who are pursuing a bachelor's or higher degree in nursing. Eligibility (not all-inclusive) Any Maine individual enrolled in a Maine accredited BSN or MSN nursing bachelors degree program Overall grade point average of “C” or better in current program Current academic transcript Confirmation of enrollment in an accredited nursing program in Maine Two letters of recommendation
  2. The Genesis Health Services Foundation provides funding for nursing scholarships. The scholarship will be awarded to a Genesis Medical Center Davenport (Iowa), Genesis Medical Center Silvis (Illinois), VNA, Hospice or GHG employee to be used toward the completion of their BSN or MSN degree. Award Up to $4,000 Requirements (not all-inclusive) Nurse practitioner programs do not qualify for this scholarship For Genesis Health System employees only
  3. To uphold the Mission of FHN and the services we provide in our communities through the support of future healthcare professionals, FHN is providing up to three $1,000 scholarships to students pursuing specific healthcare careers including the Bachelor's degree in Nursing (BSN). Applications will be accepted from any student residing in FHN's service area and currently enrolled in an accredited program of study involving the following healthcare careers: Cardiac, Diagnostic or Vascular Ultrasound Certified Medical Assisting CT Technology Health Information Management (HIM) Information Technology (with a focus on healthcare) Medical Technology / CLS / MLS Nursing (BSN) Rehabilitation Services (PT, OT, PTA, COTA, SP) Pharmacy Requirements GPA of 3.0 or better Interview 500-word essay responding to the following question: Why did you choose your career path, what have you done to support it, and how would it benefit FHN's service area?
  4. Yazmeenbp

    Villanova BSN EXPRESS 2021

    I haven’t seen a discussion yet for Villanova BSN EXPRESS for May of 2021, so I decided to write one😊. Has anyone applied or going to apply ?
  5. Career Mobility Scholarships will be awarded annually to support qualified American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA) members in the pursuit of either a BSN or advanced degree in nursing. Description NNCC Career Mobility Scholarships (5 at $2,000) Career Mobility Scholarships awarded annually to support qualified ANNA members in the pursuit of either a BSN or advanced degree in nursing Eligibility Criteria Current full member of ANNA, having been a member for a minimum of the last 2 years as of the awards/scholarship application deadline date. Actively involved in nephrology nursing related health care services. Accepted or enrolled in a baccalaureate or higher degree program in nursing. Each sponsor may request candidates meet additional criteria to those listed. Any additional criteria will be listed annually in the call for applications published in the ANNA Update and on the ANNA website. For NNCC Career Mobility Scholarships, candidates must hold current certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC). Application Process (closed) The deadline for awards, scholarships, and grants has passed for 2020. Nominations and applications are no longer being accepted. Plan to apply in 2021. (update 2/4/21)
  6. Career Mobility Scholarships will be awarded annually to support qualified American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA) members in the pursuit of either a BSN or advanced degree in nursing. Candidates must hold current certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC). Description NNCC Career Mobility Scholarships (3 at $3,000) Career Mobility Scholarships awarded annually to support qualified ANNA members in the pursuit of either a BSN or advanced degree in nursing Eligibility Criteria Current full member of ANNA, having been a member for a minimum of the last 2 years as of the awards/scholarship application deadline date. Actively involved in nephrology nursing related health care services. Accepted or enrolled in a baccalaureate or higher degree program in nursing. Each sponsor may request candidates meet additional criteria to those listed. Any additional criteria will be listed annually in the call for applications published in the ANNA Update and on the ANNA website. For NNCC Career Mobility Scholarships, candidates must hold current certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC). Application Process (closed) The deadline for awards, scholarships, and grants has passed for 2020. Nominations and applications are no longer being accepted. Plan to apply in 2021. (update 2/4/21)
  7. The American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA) Dare to Soar Career Mobility Scholarship is sponsored by Rowena W. Elliott, PhD, RN, CNN, BC, CNE, AGNP-BC, FAAN. Scholarship Amount One at $1000.00 for one year. Description This Career Mobility Scholarship will be awarded annually to support qualified ANNA members in the pursuit of either a BSN or advanced degree in nursing. Eligibility Criteria Current full member of ANNA, having been a member for a minimum of the last 2 years as of the awards/scholarship application deadline date. Actively involved in nephrology nursing related health care services. Accepted or enrolled in a baccalaureate or higher degree program in nursing. Each sponsor may request candidates meet additional criteria to those listed. Any additional criteria will be listed annually in the call for applications published in the ANNA Update and on the ANNA website. For NNCC Career Mobility Scholarships, candidates must hold current certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC). Application Process (closed) The deadline for awards, scholarships, and grants has passed for 2020. Nominations and applications are no longer being accepted. Plan to apply in 2021. (update 2/4/21)
  8. J.Adderton

    80% BSN by 2020: Where Are We Now?

    A decade ago, our healthcare system was growing more complex and patients were sicker than ever. In response, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) rolled out a 2-year initiative to determine if the nursing workforce was prepared to face these challenges. Data was gathered, analyzed and in 2010, the IOM released a report of evidence based recommendations to improve the skill and competency of working nurses. 80% BSN by 2020 The report was clear… nurses needed a higher level of education. Therefore, the IOM pushed for more BSN nurses by setting the goal of 80% of RNs earning a BSN by 2020. When the report was released in 2010, only 49% of nurses were educated on a baccalaureate level. Distinct Differences BSN and ADN nurses fill many of the same positions, with both performing similar tasks. But, there is a growing number of research studies that show BSN graduates bring greater skill to their work than ADN or diploma graduates. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) provides an overview of numerous studies in the fact sheet, The Impact of Education on Nursing Practice. According to research, BSN graduates are better prepared to: Use evidence-based practice Analyze data Implement and manage projects Communicate with other disciplines Promote patient safety Work in leadership positions Nurses with a bachelor degree have also been linked to: Lower odds of patient deaths Better patient outcomes Leading to lower costs Fewer adverse events Fewer medication errors Stronger use of research Stronger leadership skills Progress Towards Goal The nursing profession won’t meet the goal of an 80% BSN workforce by 2020, but progress is being made. The Future of Nursing’s Campaign for Action works to implement the IOM’s 2010 recommendations. Here is a quick look at their progress: Starting in 2012, the number of nurses graduating with a BSN, including RN-to-BSN, is higher than those graduating with an associate degree. From 2010 to 2012, the number of RN-to-BSN graduates increased by 180%. In 2018, the percentage of working nurses with a bachelor's degree (or higher) was up from 49% in 2010 to 57% in 2018. Since 2010, the number of nurses with a doctorate degree has doubled. To reduce the hurdles faced by nurses in obtaining advanced degrees, 30 states are now enrolling nursing students into 1 of 5 promising program models: RN-to-BSN degree from a community college to allow RNs to complete bachelor education at a community college State or regionally shared outcomes-based curriculum Accelerated RN-to-MSN programs Shared statewide or regional curriculum between universities and community colleges. Shared baccalaureate curriculum to shorten the time between obtaining an associate and a bachelor's degree. Making it Easier to Return to School ADN graduates share common concerns about returning to school. Online RN-to-BSN programs are designed to address these concerns by: Building on previous education to shorten the time it takes to earn a BSN Providing multiple start dates for RNs to enroll at a time convenient for them Formatting coursework to be completed at a time and place that works best for the student Making online programs more affordable than traditional campus-based programs Nurses may also qualify for loan forgiveness and loan-for-service programs BSN Minimal Degree for Entry Level Nurse The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) stated in a draft position paper the organization “strongly believes that registered nurses should be minimally prepared with the bachelor of science in nursing or equivalent nursing degree”. So where does this leave the associate level nurse? The National League for Nursing (NLN) argues entry points into the nursing profession shouldn’t be limited, as more nurses are needed to ease the nursing shortage. In addition, the NLN argues 2-year community college programs are “front and center in attracting students of color and those who may be marginalized by economic disadvantage”. Does The ADN Still Matter? We are all feeling the strain of the nursing shortage, especially as the pandemic marches on. What does this mean for ADN graduates? It’s impossible for baccalaureate programs to graduate enough nurses in a time-frame needed to fill the current (and future) shortage gap. Both inpatient and outpatient settings need all the nursing “hands on deck” they can get. So, the answer is a loud “YES”, associate trained nurses are still needed and new grads will have no problem finding a job. What Do You Think? Do you agree with requiring a percentage of working nurses to hold BSNs? Also, is it fair for employers to mandate the nurses they hire to obtain a bachelor degree within a specific time-frame? References: The AACN Drafts Proposal for BSN as the Entry Level for RNs, Gets Pushback U.S. Nursing Schools Call for Collaborative Action to Raise the Education Level of the Nursing Workforce Driving Factors Behind the 80% BSN by 2020 Initiative
  9. mutz1126

    Villanova BSN Express 2020

    Hi! I just wanted to create a forum for those applying for the BSN Express for May 2020 at Villanova University. I just had my interview last Friday and I am waiting patiently with the unknown. Does anyone know about how long it takes to hear? I assume it will be awhile unfortunately. Good luck with the application process!
  10. I couldn't find a thread for those applying to Villanova's BSNExpress for summer of 2019, so I created one. Who has applied? Has anyone been accepted?
  11. Hi everyone! I haven't seen a thread yet for the BSN Fall 2020 application period! HESI- 89.2% 200 hours volunteering in Kaiser E.D. CNA license but no work experience 4.0 science GPA (finishing up Micro and Physio this semester) Club Officer for Nursing Club at school 3.7 overall pre-req gpa list your stats down below 🙂
  12. Tangledupinblue

    Johns Hopkins BSN-DNP Fall 2020

    Hi all, this is my first allnurses post! I applied for early decision to JHSON BSN-DNP FNP Fall 2020 program and have interviewed. Now nervously awaiting decisions, I wanted to create a place for everyone to share decision announcements for all specialty programs. Thanks everyone and good luck 🙂
  13. aniiigh

    WGU-BSN pre-licensure

    Hello, Anyone else from California starting BSN pre-licensure program soon?
  14. The Genesis Health Services Foundation Traditional Nursing Scholarship provides $10,000 forgivable loans to students seeking admission to, or students who have been accepted into, an undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. The repayment is waived when the scholarship recipient has completed a required period of employment with Genesis. It also provides for repayment to be waived once the recipient has completed a period of employment with Genesis Medical Center Davenport (Iowa) and Genesis Medical Center Silvis (Illinois).
  15. As I think about the many graduates who walked the stage this year at Chamberlain, I offer some of the following reflections on what I've learned about continuing education. 1. There is no statute of limitations on going back to school. Part of my reasoning for completing a Ph.D. at 64 is that I want to continue to work as long as I'm able. There are people in their 70s who earn degrees simply for the sense of accomplishment. It's never too late. 2. If you want to return to school, you can find the time. Right now you may be thinking, "That's crazy, I have no time." But I've seen how busy people find the time to do what is important to them. If we think about the number of hours we waste in a week watching television or other like activities, we may find that we can carve out the needed time to do school work. To meet your educational goals, you will need to prioritize your time and exercise discipline. Figure out what works for you and find a way to fit it in. It's a sacrifice, but one you will never regret. In my second doctoral program, I had to find time on weekends because my position requires long workdays. Although I began taking one course at a time, I wanted the degree sooner so I doubled my course load halfway through the program. It meant that I had to work on school almost every weekend. When I needed to make a push to finish my dissertation, I took a week's vacation time to do the final writing and editing. The dissertation took a year and a half, during which time my husband saw little of me. Which brings me to my next piece of advice: 3. Find a support structure that works for you. My husband understood the importance of the degree and did what he could to help, including taking on some household duties. During my first doctoral program, I had a baby and worked full-time, which meant I had to rely on my mother and other family members. 4. Set your goals as early as possible, and set your sights high. Think of all that's available in nursing and what you, as a professional, want and need to accomplish. Someone once said, "Make no small plans, as the heart is stirred by setting big goals and making them happen." 5. If you've got momentum, keep going. We have students at Chamberlain who go from earning a degree to the next because they're in the groove. If you know that's what you want and now is the right time in your life, go for it! 6. Treat going to school like a job. I found that if I set myself a work schedule much like a job, I was much more successful and efficient in getting my school work done. On weekends I went to my office at 8 a.m. and worked the full day. Because the courses in my program were online, I was able to schedule the times when I planned to log in and complete the online assignments. I set goals to finish those assignments at the beginning of each week, in case they took longer than anticipated. Decide how much you're going to accomplish in each work session and pace yourself. 7. If you fall off track, you can get back on. I left my first doctoral program without completing my dissertation and went in a completely different direction before returning to health care. I finally earned a Ph.D. more than three decades after setting out to achieve that goal. The second time around, I watched many of my classmates fall off track. Life changes; priorities shift and shift again. Suddenly, it's the right time to resume. I lost ground with the time off, but when I got back on track, it was with new resolve and a focus dictated by the new direction my career had taken. 8. Explore all your educational options. Certificates are another way to continue your education. During my midlife entrepreneurial career, I took a year-long program at the University of Illinois and received a certificate in business administration and entrepreneurial studies. At Chamberlain, we offer a Graduate Certificate Program in Nursing Education and Nursing Informatics. Post-graduate fellowships, such as the nurse-educator fellowships available through the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation, are another option. 9. If you want to be a leader, you need to continue your education. The most compelling reasons for earning a degree are job advancement and career opportunity. Although I didn't need a master's degree for the job I had at the time, I decided to earn one - I knew it would open doors. My nursing diploma equipped me to provide patient care, but I also wanted to be a leader and a teacher. In most places in healthcare, you need at least a BSN degree to be a clinical supervisor, such as unit leader, and an advanced degree to go beyond that. Before I entered a BSN program, I knew plenty about patient care but little about my profession. As I continued my educational journey, a world I knew nothing about opened to me - a world of nursing scholars, theorists and professional organizations. You too can enter a new world filled with new insights, individuals, ideas and experiences. No matter your age, time constraints or setbacks - you can do it. You can build momentum, find support through friends and family and stay on track. I encourage everyone to embrace lifelong learning and to achieve your educational goals no matter what.
  16. This award will be given to a current Registered Nurse who is seeking a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree (RN to BSN). Eligibility Verification of Registered Nurse licensure Currently enrolled in an accredited RN to BSN program Resident of Georgia GPA of at least 2.5 on 4.0 scale in prior nursing education Official transcripts of previous academic work and standing related to nursing Two letters of recommendation from professional references Deadline Application and supporting documents must be submitted by no later than 10:00 pm on July 15th, in odd years only. Amount Scholarships in amounts at or above $500.
  17. Jordanmedical

    DNP without a BSN?

    I’m torn and am looking for advice from those who have been in my situation. I’m getting my ASN and am torn over whether to go for my BSN right after or take a couple pre req classes and go straight for my DNP at UCF as I have a bachelors in psych from there? If I go into DNP I’ll have about 9 months experience as an RN before the program starts if I get in on my first try I'm going to a meeting with and advisor later this week to find out more about the program.
  18. One $500 scholarship will be awarded to a student enrolled in a fully accredited college with a major in the healthcare field including nursing. Requirements (not all-inclusive) Applications will be accepted from any student currently enrolled in his or her senior year of high school or in an undergraduate program of study leading to a healthcare career including: cardiac ultrasound health information management medical technology nursing pharmacy rehabilitation services The student MUST be an active member of the FHN Student Volunteer Program with a minimum of 40 career hours. Current GPA of 3.0 or better Interview Submit an essay on the topic: How has your volunteer experience at FHN contributed to your personal career goals?
  19. The Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) offers financial assistance to nurses working toward a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. Eligibility (not all-inclusive) Membership and involvement in ARN Enrollment in a BSN program in good standing and successful completion of at least one course Current practice in rehabilitation nursing Minimum of 2 years of experience in rehabilitation nursing CRRN preferred
  20. How important is schedule to you? If you're the kind of nurse who loves working three 12s and having the rest of your week off, you might find that options are limited away from the bedside. Many non-clinical positions are Monday-Friday, daytime operations that only offer 8 hour shifts. Some may offer 4-10s or rotating shifts, but 3-day work weeks are hard to come by outside of direct patient care. What part of nursing do you enjoy? If you really love taking care of patients, and really loathe sitting in meetings and doing paperwork, that's something to consider when thinking about your BSN. Leadership and education positions tend to involve a lot of writing and speaking; if figuring out schedules, sending emails, and giving presentations is not your thing, most administrative BSN roles won't be a good fit. On the other hand, if the clinical aspect of nursing is your passion and you intend to eventually pursue an advanced practice role as a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, you will absolutely need your BSN first. CRNA programs also require at least a year of recent critical care experience, so you won't want to stray far from the bedside once you have your BSN. Is your goal to get a raise? If you're thinking of getting a BSN just to earn more and become more marketable, it helps to have the facts. In many hospitals, there is no wage increase for earning your BSN. Most facilities determine pay based on the job description, more so than the credentials. For instance, the administration looks at market values and determines that RNs at the bedside should make X dollars an hour. Some may add a bit to the hourly wage for a BSN, but many do not; a bedside nurse is a bedside nurse and they are paid as such even with a BSN. This is certainly something many would like to change, but before that can happen there will need to be a fundamental change in BSN education. Currently, a nurse can earn a BSN in a matter of months online without a single live lecture or any hands-on learning. Few, if any, BSN programs require a clinical component or practicum. There are no advanced clinical skills, no new knowledge significant enough to affect performance at the bedside, and therefore no real justification for an increase in pay. An overhaul to existing BSN programs, including advanced clinicals, might help to change that and make BSNs more marketable. If you do intend to transition into a higher-paying leadership role with your BSN, go for it; just bear in mind that most management and education roles are salaried, not hourly, so figure that into your calculations. If you're someone who relies on occasional overtime or likes to pick up holidays for the premium pay, these differentials usually don't apply to salaried (aka "exempt") positions. Are you hoping for a competitive edge in the job market? If you're trying to get ahead, continuing education and impressive credentials will certainly help. Bear in mind, though, that the BSN is becoming very commonplace now among bedside nurses. Many hospitals strongly encourage, and even require, nurses to obtain a BSN within a certain number of years after hire or in order to apply for transfers within the organization. In the recent past, BSN nurses were in leadership roles as nurse managers, directors of nursing in long-term care, and nursing instructors in diploma and ADN schools. Now that the average bedside nurse has, or is expected to earn their BSN, leadership and advanced roles are requiring even higher levels of education. You should absolutely pursue the degree if you want to advance, but many nurses now are also seeking additional certifications in various specialties like diabetes, oncology, or wound care, in order to stay competitive. Is money no object? One more thing any nurse should consider before returning to school is the matter of finances. Some may qualify for federal grants or full scholarships, but most working nurses will end up paying at least part of their tuition and fees out of pocket. If you're lucky enough to get a free ride, take full advantage of it. If you're like most nurses and have to rely on student loans and/or tuition reimbursement, take all the factors into account before you decide. For instance: What is your current financial situation? Even with student loans and tuition reimbursement, many nurses often have out of pocket expenses for every semester. If your nursing job lands you a certain income bracket, you may only receive partial student loans and have to pay the remainder of tuition yourself. That's something to consider if money is already tight. Also remember that currently, getting your BSN does not guarantee an increase in monthly income. All too often BSNs find themselves in the same job making the same money, but now with a student loan payment to contend with every month. How close are you to retirement? The repayment period for most student loans is 10 years, so it may not be worth it if you plan to retire in 6. However, if your finances are such that you could pay extra or pay the loan off early, you might want to go ahead. Are you planning to relocate or change employers after graduation? Employer tuition reimbursement usually exchanges financial aid for months or years of continued service post-graduation. If you leave your employment before the debt is worked off, the benefit has to be paid back to the facility. Read the tuition assistance policies carefully to determine how long you'll need to stay on after graduation and what your payback amount would be should you choose to leave early. Is your projected BSN salary enough to balance out the student loan debt? Most BSNs end up paying around $240 per month for their student loan after graduation, so bear in mind that you'll need to make at least that much more per month just to break even. The sad truth is that as it stands now, many BSNs find themselves struggling to make that monthly payment when there is no wage increase for earning the extra degree. Leadership roles will usually pay you a bit more, but remember to think about the schedule requirements and exempt/non-exempt status of those positions. What's the bottom line? Generally speaking, you almost can't go wrong with more education. The more letters behind your name, the better your resume looks, and there is also a sense of personal achievement. Still, when considering a BSN program, it's important to examine all the pieces: your goals, your finances, your lifestyle and family situations, as well as your likes and dislikes when it comes to work. Do you need to be home with your kids more? Do you rely on overtime or shift differential to make ends meet? Do you love patients but hate paperwork? These are all things to consider. We all eagerly look forward to the day when the BSN translates to tangible benefits for the average nurse. Sadly, as it stands right now, for many there is no life-changing advantage and the BSN serves only as a stepping stone to an even higher degree or advanced clinical practice. The information here is not meant to discourage anyone from pursuing higher education, only to help put the undergraduate degree and its pros and cons into perspective. If your facility requires the BSN for bedside nurses, then your choice is simple. However, if you just really love taking care of patients and have no desire to enter leadership or administration, you may fare better with a specialty certification in an area that interests you. The cost is far less, and the BSN does not focus on clinical skills. If you do want to qualify for entry-level leadership and education roles, then the BSN is the way to go. In future we hope to see the BSN carry more weight and offer more leverage, but to do so it must also provide increased skills and greater knowledge. Changes in education are likely the only thing that will translate into changes in benefits. Still, the great thing about nursing is that we have a wide-open, versatile field where there is something for everybody. Hopefully the information included here can help you decide which of those somethings is right for you in your own nursing practice.
  21. Joe V

    Rita E. Miller Scholarship

    The scholarship is sponsored by Barbara Julian, Member, Council of Black Nurses, Los Angeles, in memory of Rita E. Miller, Department Chair, School of Nursing, Dillard University. Scholarship Requirements (not all-inclusive) BSN nursing student attending a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Member of NBNA and a member of a local chapter; if a chapter does not exist within a 50-radius of your location you can join NBNA as a Direct Member Good scholastic standing at the time of application One full year of school remaining Official Transcript(s) from an accredited School of Nursing Written Essay Two letters of recommendation Amount $2500
  22. Applicant must be a current graduating senior of Smithville High School or a previous recipient of the award. Eligibility (not all-inclusive) Applicant must be a current graduating senior of Smithville High School or a previous recipient of the award Enrolled or enrolling in a program that will lead to a Bachelor's or an advanced degree in the fields of: Science Technology Engineering Primary healthcare (RN, Nurse Practitioner, physician assistant, or family care MD/DO) Minimum 3.20 GPA (on a 4.00 point scale) ACT score of no less than 30 or its equivalent SAT score Currently enrolled college applicants must be in good standing as full-time students and have no less than a 3.00 GPA (on a 4.00 point scale) Preference given to applicant with exemplary leadership, community service, and participation in extracurricular actives. Scholarship Term: 4 Years Amount: $20,000 ($5,000 per year) Number of New Awards Each Year: Two
  23. These scholarships are not limited geographically and are awarded to rescue workers who are obtaining an associate's (ADN) or baccalaureate degree (BSN) in nursing. Requirements (not all-inclusive) Proof of acceptance into an accredited ADN or BSN nursing program Proof of at least one year of pre-hospital work experience Applicants do not need to be members of ENA but must provide a letter of reference from a current ENA member Recommendation letters (2)
  24. Funding for this scholarship is made possible by the generosity of the New York ENA State Council and members through the 2016 ENA Foundation State Fundraising Challenge. Requirements (not all-inclusive) This scholarship is awarded to an emergency nurse (RN) pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN) Applicants must be an ENA member for a minimum of twelve (12) months immediately prior to applying Two letters of recommendation Minimum 3.0 GPA Applicants must be attending an NLN or AACN accredited school and must provide verification of the school's current accreditation
  25. MM1989

    Why is BSN required for CRNA?

    I’m working on my RN and plan to go to CRNA school. I’ve noticed that a few CRNA schools will allow you to have a bachelors in other science areas, as long as you are an RN. But the best school seem to require a BSN. Why is that? Why is an easy, relatively useless, easy to obtain degree required over something like a bachelors in chemistry?