Japan needs nurses, STAT - page 2

by betakurt

13,165 Views | 36 Comments

Japan Health Care | Population | Elderly | Nursing... Read More


  1. 4
    If it was lucrative enough I might consider it, but there's also the 'not knowing the language' thing

    From what I remember in school it was Japanese (but may have been Korea) that their people value their elders in the highest regard, which would make my job very difficult (and sad watching people die slow and painful deaths) when keeping with the wishes of families to keep a dying loved one alive at all cost.

    Not saying that doesn't happen here, but watching this chips away at me little by little
    Zookeeper3, subee, BOOYARN, and 1 other like this.
  2. 0
    How do you spell keneenisheewah?
  3. 0
    Konichiwa, I think.

    In any case, I don't think I could do so well in Japan. The language requirement will be hard to pass.
  4. 1
    I wish we had those uniforms to graduate in!!! Some of my classmates would have fit right in
    dreamon likes this.
  5. 1
    Would love to visit Japan, but it is a very closed society and quite racist. Seems like they might benefit from working within their own country to draw more people into nursing.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  6. 4
    Quote from bethelstudent
    Konichiwa, I think.

    In any case, I don't think I could do so well in Japan. The language requirement will be hard to pass.
    Konnichiwa. Or こんにちは, if you prefer.

    Japan is an interesting ancient country. I had the opportunity to live & work there for 4 months back in 1989. Yes, the Japanese as a people can be somewhat racist (especially towards Koreans). Not like us Amurkins here in the good ol' USA, nossirree Bob!

    While I was there, the Japanese were definitely sexist. If you were met at the airport by a female employee of the company you were visiting, that was a definite insult. I'm not sure if this has changed over the past 20+ years, but hope so. Japanese tend to use "-chan" diminutive endings when referring to a female...or a child (like calling a woman named Keiko "Keiko-chan"). A male would be called by their name, plus "-kun", "-san", or "-sama", depending on what level of honorific/formality you need to use (such as Hironaga-san).

    I think the main complicating factor in learning Japanese is Kanji (the Chinese/Japanese ideograms). There are thousands of them, along with the two simpler alphabets/phonograms (Hiragana & Katakana). I only picked up a few Kanji while I was there, but could read Hiragana & Katakana fairly well (now VERY rusty due to lack of use...my bad).

    One good thing about the Japanese language, though, is that if you see a word written in Hiragana or Katakana, you KNOW how it is pronounced. Not at all like English, where letter combinations are pronounced in totally weird/different ways. Just look at how the letter pair "gh" is pronounced in the words cough, ghost, and though. With the simplified Japanese alphabets, you can see a character and KNOW how it's pronounced. English is a weird language. In Japanese, a given Kanji ideogram may be pronounced in different ways depending on the context. I guess in this way, Japanese is also a weird language.

    The Japanese also seem to have a different view on openness with patients. If a physician knows that a patient has a terminal condition, they may very well not tell that to the patient, at the patient's family's request.
    banchan, That Guy, ToxicShock, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    Wouldn't it be more cost efficient to hire a couple of translators per hospital, and just let the nurses do their thing, with assistance when needed? Duh!
    GreenTeaMochi likes this.
  8. 0
    first u have to know how to speak japanese.
  9. 2
    Quote from lcc1080
    Wouldn't it be more cost efficient to hire a couple of translators per hospital, and just let the nurses do their thing, with assistance when needed? Duh!
    Then how would you be able to communicate properly with the patient, family and other members of the multidisciplinary team?
    Katie5 and CrufflerJJ like this.
  10. 0
    Sorry. I would never want a nursing job that bad.


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