School Nurse Gives Wrong Medication - page 3

This was a story on our local news last night. Would love to know what really happened. Parents: Child Gets Wrong Medicine at School Nurse's Office in Blackstone | NECN... Read More

  1. by   OldDude
    I had a sub nurse give an ADHD med to the wrong kid here at my campus. She was very upset and I really felt sorry for her. It didn't make the news and no real negative fall-out came from it. The prevention for this incident would have been to ask the child what their name is instead of asking the child...are you XYZ?
  2. by   mom to many
    A few years ago at the HS in my district, a student lied to the 'sub' nurse about who she was so she could take someone else ADHD med. Now at all of our campuses, we post a labeled picture of each student in our med cabinets of the ones that takes any Rx meds (daily and/or PRN). This has been helpful to me at the beginning of the year when I'm learning my kiddos that are in Pre-K and Kinder that may not be able to tell me their correct name.
  3. by   Jen-Elizabeth
    Quote from mom to many
    A few years ago at the HS in my district, a student lied to the 'sub' nurse about who she was so she could take someone else ADHD med. Now at all of our campuses, we post a labeled picture of each student in our med cabinets of the ones that takes any Rx meds (daily and/or PRN). This has been helpful to me at the beginning of the year when I'm learning my kiddos that are in Pre-K and Kinder that may not be able to tell me their correct name.
    Pictures for subs are super helpful! Since we don't have photos in my EMR (though we are working it!), I leave any sub with copy of last year's yearbook (I am also the yearbook adviser for my school and have my stock copy available) and have left post-its in the pages of my med kiddos and frequent fliers .
  4. by   BeckyESRN
    I label all of my medication bins with the student's picture at the start of the year-not that it would have made a difference in the outcome of this situation, but I feel like it gives my subs some degree of reassurance.
  5. by   kidzcare
    At my old school the students were required to wear their IDs at all times and I also left a list with the daily meds of the student's birthdays for identification.

    When I started at my current school, I had a student or 2 annoyed with me that I would look up their profile in the computer before dispensing meds. But I'd rather be safe than way sorry.
  6. by   Nurse_JackieVA
    This was my biggest fear when I first started working in the school...wrong med to the wrong kid. I would keep asking the kids for their first and last names until I had their faces engraved in my brain and even then I'd still have them tell me their first and last name. I'm sooo paranoid I'm going to make a mistake and have a deadly outcome. I wish we were allowed to have pictures of the kids, we don't here but it's a huge safety issue.
  7. by   abc123RN
    I have twin boys at my school, both on ADHD med. Fortunately one is blond and the other is brunette. They take the same med but different doses. I made this note in the sub folder since they are known to try and "mess" with the subs here.
  8. by   peacockblue
    First of all, I can't believe the family went to the media. How horrifying for the nurse. They don't want her punished, but publicly shaming her is ok? Second, in one of the elementary schools I travel to, there are two blond 4th grade boys who take different meds at the same time and they are always lying to me about which one is which. Parents think it is fu ny. I do not. They are a med error waiting to happen. Can only imagine what they would do to the subs.
  9. by   lifelearningrn
    I agree with everyone else.. and am really glad my district doesn't have 'standing' orders for OTC meds. The teachers would have a field day sending me kids to medicate every bump or complaint. In my district, even OTC need to have doctor's orders AND be dispensed like prescriptions (labeled from pharmisist) in order to be given. It really cuts down on cough meds, OTC pain, cough drops, etc...
  10. by   LessValuableNinja
    That's an excellent idea / helpful. We did that at a nursing home I used to work at, and some hospitals are starting to transition to doing so in the EMRs. However, it seems like in this case, simply following day 1 of clinical protocol in nursing school would have prevented an issue: Nurse: "Hey there. How can I help you?" Child: "I want medication!" "Okay! I'm going to need you to tell me your first name, last name, and date of birth." Compare to chart/mar / whatever system is used. And voila, no Ritalin for the wrong kid. Technology is helpful, but following very, very basic protocol, that you would fail nursing school if consistently ignoring, would have been preventative.
  11. by   LessValuableNinja
    That was a response to the use of photographs for kids receiving medication (which again, I agree with, but standard practice would have prevented in the absence of that).
  12. by   Jen-Elizabeth
    Quote from nicktexas
    That was a response to the use of photographs for kids receiving medication (which again, I agree with, but standard practice would have prevented in the absence of that).
    I agree standard might have been helpful, but this may have even happened with it and no photo. In a school setting, kids are not always truthful (hence the twins above that think telling the nurse they are each other is funny and their parents agree!). And young ones may not actually know their full date of birth.

    These don't make our jobs easier and do make for some issues in med pass - a picture is a very good back-up and for me, kinda the 6th check for any sub school nurse.

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