Just got REAMED at...

  1. by a parent who brought his child to school even though he vomited in the classroom yesterday. He was told yesterday that child was to stay home today and then LIED to the teachers that he was cleared by me. He is flat out refusing to pick him up. I have the full support of the administration. I also have a child in my office....
    So, I'm thinking of creating a document parents would have to sign stating they are aware of the policy when they are picking up their kid. Anyone else have anything like that? Thanks!
    •  
  2. 31 Comments

  3. by   Farawyn
    That sucks.

    Is the kid feverish, still vomiting or having diarrhea or pain?

    We had that protocol in grade school. In HS they sometimes even stay in school if they do vomit. Much of it is called by pushing themselves too hard in gym. Or food challenges.
  4. by   AdobeRN
    I don't have parents sign anything but I have little notes that I hand to the parent when I call them to pick the student up. I physically walk the students to the office and tell the parent or whoever is picking the student up whether or not the student can return the next day and hand them the note with the policy for whatever reason I am sending them home in writing. 99% of the time this works for me
  5. by   Jacquipals
    He looks and feels fine today- no fever. Dad told me son was "perfect" yesterday. Meanwhile kiddo told how sick he was and that he couldn't eat anything because of his stomach. Who knows if he was given Tylenol this morning.
  6. by   OldDude
    In this incident it wouldn't have made a difference if the parent had signed a paper. Don't waste your time on the 99%, as Adobe mentioned, that will comply with the rules. The 1% will never comply. I get this a lot with the "perfect attendance" crowd.

    See if your admin will allow the child to be counted as "absent," even though he/she is on the property but not eligible to attend classes according to school policy.
  7. by   Farawyn
    Quote from OldDude
    In this incident it wouldn't have made a difference if the parent had signed a paper. Don't waste your time on the 99%, as Adobe mentioned, that will comply with the rules. The 1% will never comply. I get this a lot with the "perfect attendance" crowd.

    See if your admin will allow the child to be counted as "absent," even though he/she is on the property but not eligible to attend classes according to school policy.
    OOooooooOOOOh, sneaky!
  8. by   KoalalaRN
    I don't have a document, but I make sure those instructions are relayed to the parent in front of our office staff as witnesses. I have considered doing the same though, just to have documentation that the parent received/accepted our directions.
    Luckily, I have learned from experience that my school principal will back me up on any issues such as this. If it seems like a parent is even trying to refuse to pick up their child, I offer to let them speak with the principal. 100% of the time, the parent angrily agrees to come get the child when they realize the principal and I work together and will not allow it. It's frustrating when parents don't seem to want to follow the directions, but I just have to let that go. If it takes the threat of a principal calling, whatever. I just want the rules followed and the best for all of our students health. Go teamwork! Good luck!
  9. by   SullyRN
    We don't have a fever free/vomit free policy. Honestly some kids will puke once and be just fine. Maybe they ate something that didn't agree. Maybe it was mucus. That's why before I send a kid home they have to puke twice and it be witnessed. I'm mean.

    But if it is your school's policy, I like OldDude's suggestion along with your suggestion. Maybe have them sign something that says "If student returns to school prior to the 24 hours, they will be counted absent and I am aware...."
  10. by   Jen-Elizabeth
    Quote from SullyRN
    We don't have a fever free/vomit free policy. Honestly some kids will puke once and be just fine. Maybe they ate something that didn't agree. Maybe it was mucus. That's why before I send a kid home they have to puke twice and it be witnessed. I'm mean.
    Same. Even when they report puking once, I still have them sit to observe. I can tell sick vs. not sick usually by demeanor, even when they don't actually puke again.

    And I have so. many. anxiety pukers. Those students don't go home usually.

    I'm also mean, I guess.
  11. by   BeckyESRN
    I'm mean too. If you say you puked, but no one witnessed it and you look fine, then crackers and a few minutes on a cot. Most often my little ones think that puking means coughed a felt mucus. The big ones, well, they just think it'll get them a ticket home!
  12. by   GdBSN
    We also have a two puke policy, witnessed by an adult, and has to be projectile vomiting. I let the student rest in the office for 15 minutes, if none have occurred, then the student goes back to class.
  13. by   SullyRN
    I will add, the school that I was at at the beginning of last year sent any one time puker home. It was like pulling teeth to get them to understand the mucus pukes, the inducers, etc. Drove me nuts.
  14. by   kidzcare
    Similar to what someone wrote, I would walk kids to the parent and say "Because your child vomited in school today, they will need to stay home tomorrow. I will let our attendance secretary know so that you do not need to call Snowflake in" and then I document "parent informed that student will need to stay home from school tomorrow and voices understanding."

close