Im soooo lost..what do I do next - page 2

Well actually I do know what to do next..APPLY to nursing school but im scared... I don't have great grades im a B student and I repeated 2 classes(anatomy and micro.) ANYONE In the same boat???? OR... Read More

  1. by   -alice-
    OKAY, I've already DROPPPED AnatomyI&II. The teacher and tests was ridiculous and i was NOT going to let him trick us on the test and have me fail. so I am taking A&P I at community college next semester - do you guys think that will transfer to a major university?
  2. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from -alice-
    OKAY, I've already DROPPPED AnatomyI&II. The teacher and tests was ridiculous and i was NOT going to let him trick us on the test and have me fail. so I am taking A&P I at community college next semester - do you guys think that will transfer to a major university?
    In our area, most CC classes are transferable....to be sure though, you need to talk to the admissions folks where you're going to apply...

    Good luck!
  3. by   MIKelly
    Quote from -alice-
    OKAY, I've already DROPPPED AnatomyI&II. The teacher and tests was ridiculous and i was NOT going to let him trick us on the test and have me fail. so I am taking A&P I at community college next semester - do you guys think that will transfer to a major university?
    I think an A&P course will transfer from CC to university. From what I understand CC really "dumbs down" the class from what you would be expected to know at university. I am currently taking A&P at a CC and have an A in the class. It's not nearly as hard as I thought it would be. I mean, it's intense and there is plenty to memorize, but it's quite doable with a good grade if you put the study time in.
  4. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from MIKelly
    I think an A&P course will transfer from CC to university. From what I understand CC really "dumbs down" the class from what you would be expected to know at university. I am currently taking A&P at a CC and have an A in the class. It's not nearly as hard as I thought it would be. I mean, it's intense and there is plenty to memorize, but it's quite doable with a good grade if you put the study time in.
    I'm doing the same. I originally started at a University this Fall but I have decided to go the ASN route at a CC and finish the BSN later.

    The AP class at the University had a 70% first-time taker FAIL rate, mainly because, the school got special funding to 'beef up' their science and biology department and the AP courses are specifically designed for the Pre-Med student.
  5. by   sdmommie
    You're not alone. I think every school looks at applicants differently. My CC just wants you to have a 2.5 GPA on A&P and Micro. If you have that, you are able to get on their VERY LONG waiting list. Hey, at least they didn't say no. I know it's not very competitive, but it's my way in.
  6. by   catzy5
    Quote from Cree8ive1
    Wow, great discussion! I'm sure it's talked about in other threads, but are you all applying to BSN programs? Or 2-year RN/associate's degree programs? I have a BA in English and after a lot of soul searching (and a not so stellar BA GPA) decided to go the 2-year degree route to nursing. I know BSNs get more respect in the workplace, but the pay is close to the same and I figure there's a lot to be said for getting the RN and becoming employable in the field in two years, then letting my future employer help me pay for my BSN and MSN. Is this crazy thinking? I don't mean to go off topic, but maybe it's a little easier to get into the community college programs as a last resort for someone struggling with GPA for BSN acceptance? To me, anything over a 3.0 should be a shoe-in for BSN programs, no? This is so scary to me! At the community college where I was accepted, prior college GPA was not one of the core criteria, though they did look at current science grades...the competitiveness of all this is kind of terrifying. Good luck to everyone who is applying!

    I think it depends on your area, sometimes the BSN programs are easier as they are at bigger schools, have more space and don't take strictly on grades. Many have a multitude of entrence "points" you can earn, GPA only being part, I know the choices I have here are 2 ADN programs one with a waitlist extremely long and my school which I chose because there is no WAIT you have to reaply every semester and they take strictly on GPA with only 12 spots fall and 24 spring. I am not very good at tests so I didn't want to take an extrence exam and I don't want to be put on a wait list. There are many options out there you have to look around and see what will suit you best.

    I have talked to many people who have gotten BSN's because they had a better shot at getting in and it took less time (then wait lists etc).
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from sdmommie
    You're not alone. I think every school looks at applicants differently. My CC just wants you to have a 2.5 GPA on A&P and Micro. If you have that, you are able to get on their VERY LONG waiting list. Hey, at least they didn't say no. I know it's not very competitive, but it's my way in.

    ahhh you must live near me I might know which CC you are talking about LOL I haven't applied to that one because of the Wait list but I know many from the CC that is close to me that comes to my school as we don't have the waitlist.
  8. by   MikeyJ
    I am finishing up my pre-req's at a University for their BSN program. I must agree that University's tend to beef up their pre-req sceince classes. I am taking microbiology right now, and the mean and median for the first exam was around a 60% D-. Students who take these classes at the community college usually walk out with A's on all of their pre-reqs. It is actually rare to find a nursing student who took all of their classes at the University level and have A's in all of their pre-req's. My school requires that you complete your pre-req's with at least a 'B' or better, so it makes the program that much more competitive. Many students struggle at the University level science classes and are unable to get B's. Also, if you have taken a pre-req more than 2 times, they will not allow you to be admitted to the School of Nursing.

    So, the person who posted that Universities tend to be less restrictive on their grade requirements than a community college -- it is not because they are less competitive; it is due to the fact that their science classes are usually much more difficult to do well in than at the community college level. That is the same reasoning why med schools would prefer their applicants to have completed all of their science work at a university level -- they understand that a student who received a 4.0 in their pre-reqs from a community college is probably not as well prepared as the student with the 3.6 from the university. This of course does not hold true for all community colleges and universities -- but it is probably the consensus.
  9. by   catzy5
    Quote from sistermike
    I am finishing up my pre-req's at a University for their BSN program. I must agree that University's tend to beef up their pre-req sceince classes. I am taking microbiology right now, and the mean and median for the first exam was around a 60% D-. Students who take these classes at the community college usually walk out with A's on all of their pre-reqs. It is actually rare to find a nursing student who took all of their classes at the University level and have A's in all of their pre-req's. My school requires that you complete your pre-req's with at least a 'B' or better, so it makes the program that much more competitive. Many students struggle at the University level science classes and are unable to get B's. Also, if you have taken a pre-req more than 2 times, they will not allow you to be admitted to the School of Nursing.

    So, the person who posted that Universities tend to be less restrictive on their grade requirements than a community college -- it is not because they are less competitive; it is due to the fact that their science classes are usually much more difficult to do well in than at the community college level. That is the same reasoning why med schools would prefer their applicants to have completed all of their science work at a university level -- they understand that a student who received a 4.0 in their pre-reqs from a community college is probably not as well prepared as the student with the 3.6 from the university. This of course does not hold true for all community colleges and universities -- but it is probably the consensus.

    also they have more spots available, I go to a community college right now and I can tell you the AP classes we have here are on par with any university if not more difficult then some, our instructors pride themselves on thier science courses and level of difficulty/ prepairedness of their students.
  10. by   cad4296
    The thinking that community college sciences are sub par to university level sciences is not true. Maybe at some schools but definately not true from all the schools I've been to (4 different CC's and universities in my college career) I have taken sciences at both community college and universities and the tests at the university were often easier because they were all multiple choice and I never had lab practical exams. In the CC the class sizes are smaller so alot of tests are fill in the blank. You either know it or you don't and you are out of luck if you don't! Oh and spelling always counts, especially with the medical terms. My A & P instructor at the community college also teaches at the university and her class curriculum is exactly the same. It is hard! She said only 2 students failing her lab practical was a miracle. We take the same A & P as the pre-med students, and it is no walk in the park. We are all killing ourselves for C's and B's on our exams. For most of us our only saving hope is the graded quizzes (which are just as hard as the tests!) and labs to try to pull our averages up. When we complain about lousy tests scores her response is "This is anatomy, it's supposed to be hard! There are doctors, nurses, dentists, vets taking this class. They are responsible for lives so they better know anatomy and phisiology front to back" And the majority of the questions found on our exams are not even directly stated in the book. You have to apply the processes and use what you know to apply it to practical situations to get your answer (critical thinking skills!) I spend at least 10 hours a week studying and really know this stuff in depth but still am lucky to have B's and C's on the tests!
    Last edit by cad4296 on Oct 26, '06
  11. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from cad4296
    The thinking that community college sciences are sub par to university level sciences is not true. Maybe at some schools but definitely not true from all the schools I've been to (4 different CC's and universities in my college career) I have taken sciences at both community college and universities and the tests at the university were often easier because they were all multiple choice and I never had lab practical exams.
    :yeahthat: I took a year of Physics and Chemistry at a 4-year University and I never once had a lab practical. I also did not have exams that threw in critical thinking questions that were not bonus questions (usually only one or two). Plus the 4-year University I graduated from is a name school that has its own Medical School and Vet School.

    Quote from cad4296
    In the CC the class sizes are smaller so a lot of tests are fill in the blank. You either know it or you don't and you are out of luck if you don't! Oh and spelling always counts, especially with the medical terms.
    This is the reason why half my Micro class at the CC failed! My Professor (a Doctor of Microbiology) also threw in critical thinking questions, which were the basis of our exams and quizzes. Thus, no matter how much you studied, you needed to be able to apply the information or you were out of luck! :spin:

    I agree, 4-year Universities are not necessarily harder then CCs. I know on its face it should be so, but it is not so. I had a friend who is a Harvard graduate that told me she thought that the undergraduate course work was not difficult. What is difficult is competing with your peers; not everyone can walk away with an "A". However, there are reports that she may not be correct. Grade inflation at 4-year Universities (especially the Ivy League schools) is at an all time high.
    Last edit by SummerGarden on Oct 27, '06
  12. by   WDWpixieRN
    I can't compare science courses per se, but I graduated with a general transfer AA to attend a local university and was astounded as how lousy this university was compared to what I had left. I felt like I was back in high school and the instructors were horrible (tenure ). I was so very disappointed as this college was usually ranked pretty high and tuition was NOT cheap.

    I kind of felt like the comment that CCs were not as good as universities was not a fair statement based on my experience. I think each stands on its own reputation and that's where your "homework" when you're looking for a college to attend is so very important.

    Our CC nursing program has an excellent reputation in this area and there are several university programs and a hospital-based program in this area to be compared against.
  13. by   mixyRN
    Quote from Dreamer528
    Well actually I do know what to do next..APPLY to nursing school but im scared... I don't have great grades im a B student and I repeated 2 classes(anatomy and micro.) ANYONE In the same boat???? OR AM I THE ONLY PERSON ON HERE WHO DOESN'T HAVE STRAIGHT A'S AND HASN'T REPEATED ANY CLASSES.....PLEASE TELL ME IM NOT ALONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    OP-
    I have FAR from a perfect transcript! My first few attempts at college in the 1990's left many blemishes on my transcripts, but I managed to earn my AA degree in 2000 with a 3.01 GPA. When I decided to pursue nursing, I KNEW it was going to be a challenge to get accepted so I decided to take all my non-nursing courses first at a community college. Since this past January, I have earned straight A's for all my co-req's for the nursing degree- Micro, A&P I & II, Intro Psych and Developmental Psych. I felt I had to "prove" myself so to speak. It worked, and I begin my nursing program in January. So, it definitely can be done without a perfect record- I'm proof of that- so keep working toward your goal!

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