How do I become a nurse's aide?

  1. 0 Well I just applied to nursing schools for next fall but in the mean time I am broke and also do not know if I will be put on a waitlist for next fall anyway.

    I read about hospitals helping with education and stuff if you are on their payroll.

    Well I figure being a nurse's aide would help me decide if I 100% want to be a nurse anyway (I am in a bit of career exploration mode).

    So what is the actual term for nurse's aid? And how long is school if you already have a bachelor's degree? Can someone point me in the right direction? Thanks and Happy Holidays!
  2. Visit  cherylnj81 profile page

    About cherylnj81

    From 'NJ'; 34 Years Old; Joined Nov '05; Posts: 28.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  pricklypear profile page
    0
    A nurses aide can be called a few different things. CNA (certified nurses aide), nurse tech (usually a nursing student working as an aide - sometimes with increased responsibility or duties), PCT (patient care technician).

    CNAs usually take some kind of course, usually a few weeks long, then a competency/licensing exam. A nurse tech usually has to be a nursing student who is at a certain point in the program. A PCT is usually trained by the hospital or institution, and doesn't have to take a licensing exam. They all pretty much do the same things, and perform in the same role. I wouldn't think the pay would be much different, either. This is all based on my experience in the states I have lived in.

    When I first started school, I saw an ad for a nursing home who paid for my CNA training (done on site) then hired me. Many hospitals here advertise for PCT, with no experience needed. They train you on site.

    I would look on the job openings at your local hospitals for jobs like "patient care technician" for a start.

    Hope this helps!!
  4. Visit  Someday-C.R.N.A. profile page
    0
    I went to a local tech school, and got in to a CNA program right away, no wait list.

    My course is 8 weeks long, two days per week, 6 hours per day. The course, books, name tag, etc. cost me about $300, and the test to become state certified will be another $100.

    If you get lucky, you may be able to find an employer who'll be willing to pay for it or, better yet, train you on-site. You just gotta do some leg work. (Or Google work! )

    Good luck!!
  5. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    0
    here are some links for you to explore about nursing assistants in the state of new jersey.

    http://www.state.nj.us/health/ltc/nacert.shtml
    http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/hhh/hhaneed.htm
    http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/hhh/agency.pdf

    i could not find a specific classification for cna in new jersey on the board of nursing web site. however, i would suggest that you post a question on the new jersey forum of this site and you should get a response from nurses who work in your state. it seems as though nj has two separate designations for nursing assistants. one is for nursing assistants working in long term care (nursing homes) and the other is for those working in home health care. check them out. the third link is a listing of schools that teach the required curriculum for the home health aides.

    if you can't get the information from all the different sources i have suggested i would suggest you make a call to the nj board of nursing and ask. the board will also be able to tell you what programs are approved training sites.

    good luck.
  6. Visit  adamsmom profile page
    0
    Call around to area nursing homes. I currently work as a CNA, they taught me and took the test there too. THey are also paying for my education.
    Good Luck
  7. Visit  st4wb3rr33sh0rtc4k3 profile page
    0
    You can probably do several things:

    The American Red Cross offers CNA course.

    Some jobs will even train you without being lisenced, or they will pay for the training on-site.

    In my state, after you complete your 1st semester of nursing that has clinical time, you can sit for your CNA lisence, that is what I did.
  8. Visit  Jessy_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from ntcomplt8265
    You can probably do several things:

    The American Red Cross offers CNA course.

    Some jobs will even train you without being lisenced, or they will pay for the training on-site.

    In my state, after you complete your 1st semester of nursing that has clinical time, you can sit for your CNA lisence, that is what I did.

    Yes, some Red Cross's offer the course for about 500 dollars. Good luck
  9. Visit  rn2bein08 profile page
    0
    You can actually "challenge the exam" and not take the 6 week long course and just come in and take the written and skills exam. This is what I did. I bought the book that they use at the local tech college and studied my way through it. This way I only paid $140 instead of the $600 for the course and exam. I hope no one said this already!
  10. Visit  casi profile page
    0
    I've heard that very few people acctually pass the challenging of the exam. The written portion is easily common sense. (One of my classmates had the questions on her test: What do you wash first? Cups, Plates, Silverware, Glasses?) The hard part of the test it the skills if you don't have previous experience. There's a lot of itty bitty steps that they look for that you'll probably forget once your on the job.
  11. Visit  rn2bein08 profile page
    0
    hi casi! where do you go to school? i live in MN and go to MSU.
  12. Visit  pdpeanut profile page
    0
    I'm a pre-nursing student working as a nurse's aid on a busy med/surg floor of a local hospital, and I DEFINITELY recommend becoming a CNA. Not only will you be a better RN, but you'll see the challenges that you'll face every day on the unit. While I have no question in my mind that getting my RN is what I want to do, I must say that I have a completely different idea of what the hospital RN does today than before I started working as an aide 9 months ago. The experience so far has been invaluable. Plus, there are a few nurses in my floor that know I will be going for my RN and take the time to call me if they are doing a procedure, inserting a catheter, changing a dressing, so I can help and at least see how they do it. Check with your local Red Cross, or just look in the classified section of your local paper under job training, and I bet there are about 10 different local schools with CNA training. Good luck, and feel free to contact me with any questions.
  13. Visit  syin profile page
    0
    Pdpeanut, thanks for sharing your experience. I am a pre-nursing student and I want to gain experience right now as a CNA. Do hospitals hire CNA without prior hospital experience? I'm afraid if I take the course, no one would hire me.
  14. Visit  pdpeanut profile page
    0
    Quote from syin
    Pdpeanut, thanks for sharing your experience. I am a pre-nursing student and I want to gain experience right now as a CNA. Do hospitals hire CNA without prior hospital experience? I'm afraid if I take the course, no one would hire me.
    I know around my area, hospitals are always looking for CNAs. You shouldn't have any problem finding work. And, I think that taking the course would be nothing but a benefit to you. The experience that you'll gain through the course and your clinicals will be invaluable to you, and will make you a better RN, in my opinion. Even if you have trouble finding employment at a hospital initially, you would definitely be able to find work at a long term care facility/nursing home, where you would learn the basics of patient care, which you will use EVERY DAY at the hospital. Let me know if you have any more questions!


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