LPN is NOT considered nursing experience?!

  1. 0
    Hi all,

    I wanted to start a thread where I can hear from other LPNs, who transitioned to RNs, that are having difficulty finding employment.

    Just a little about me, I have been employed by the same health region for almost 9 years here in Vancouver, BC. I started out as a Unit Clerk for 3 years, completed my LPN but was bumped from my permanent part-time position, so I decided to complete the BSN program. In between terms, I was working as casual LPN so that I can maintain my clinical experience, as well as to keep my seniority when I start applying for a New Graduate Nurse RN position. By no means that I am picky when it comes to finding a job, any clinical nursing job will do for me. I have four years, as a LPN, working on a medical, surgical and long-term unit and now that I have forwarded my resume to Human Resources, I feel that HR and/or the managers do not consider LPN as nursing experience.

    Three weeks ago I went for my first interview on a Transitional Care Unit, and one week later the manager informed me that I am not the right candidate for the position, so I asked for feedback. Of course, I would like to know what I said wrong and what I can improve upon for my next interview. What she said surprised me cause (in her opinion) as a LPN and New Graduate RN, I am lacking in some skills (e.g., blood transfusion, chest tubes, NG tubes, PICCs). I did explain to the manager how these skills are initiated by RNs and the LPNs Scope of Practise is to assess and notify/collaborate with the RNs when caring for patients requiring these type of treatments.

    Sorry to vent, but I did not expect to find it this difficult to land a registered nurse position for the same company that I have been employed with for the past 9 years. I graduated from the BSN program in November 2013 and I am awaiting for the CRNE results at the moment. I am thankful that I maintained my registration with CLPNBC. That being said, is LPN not considered nursing experience when applying for a New Grad RN position? Any thoughts fellow LPNs/RNs??
    Last edit by canuck-nurse on Mar 8
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  4. 0
    Three weeks ago I went for my first interview on a Transitional Care Unit, and one week later the manager informed me that I am not the right candidate for the position, so I asked for feedback. Of course, I would like to know what I said wrong and what I can improve upon for my next interview. What she said surprised me cause (in her opinion) as a LPN and New Graduate RN, I am lacking in some skills (e.g., blood transfusion, chest tubes, NG tubes, PICCs). I did explain to the manager how these skills are initiated by RNs and the LPNs Scope of Practise is to assess and notify/collaborate with the RNs when caring for patients requiring these type of treatments.

    Sorry to vent, but I did not expect to find it this difficult to land a registered nurse position for the same company that I have been employed with for the past 9 years. I graduated from the BSN program in November 2013 and I am awaiting for the CRNE results at the moment. I am thankful that I maintained my registration with CLPNBC. That being said, is LPN not considered nursing experience when applying for a New Grad RN position? Any thoughts fellow LPNs/RNs??

    I'm confused. You went for an interview for a new grad RN position and you were told that you were lacking some skills? A New Grad RN position usually takes into consideration that the applicant does not have nursing experience or mastered skills, thats why its a NEW GRAD position. All the skills you mentioned were covered in my LPN to RN transition classes..and I actually did all of them during my clinical rotations. Am I an expert, nope...but I have learned the skills. I'm assuming that you too had been taught the same skills as you mentined. Not sure what that manager was getting at. I'm not in from Canada so maybe its different.

    From what I've experienced, some hosptials will take into consideration the LPN's experience. One particular hospital sees 2 years of LPN exp as 1 year of RN exp when they require 'experience'. Some of the NM that I've interviewed with have said that they normally don't hire new grad RN's but because of my LPN experience they don't see me as really a 'new' nurse and they wanted to interview me. I have been licensed as an LPN since 2008. Some places do not take any of my LPN nursing experience as 'experience' and look at me the same as they would a fellow new grad RN who wasn't an LPN.
  5. 1
    I was an LPN for 4 years before earning my RN license. In the local workforce I was considered a new grad RN with 4 years of LPN experience.

    However, I must mention that geographic location matters. You, the OP, are in British Columbia, and I've heard that it is a brutal job market for nurses.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  6. 0
    Unfortunately, this seems to be the case a lot of times. I knew a girl with seven years of LPN experience in acute care who was denied an RN position after graduation for lack of experience ...and she was the best of the best.
  7. 1
    Quote from canuck-nurse
    Hi all,

    I wanted to start a thread where I can hear from other LPNs, who transitioned to RNs, that are having difficulty finding employment.

    Just a little about me, I have been employed by the same health region for almost 9 years here in Vancouver, BC. I started out as a Unit Clerk for 3 years, completed my LPN but was bumped from my permanent part-time position, so I decided to complete the BSN program. In between terms, I was working as casual LPN so that I can maintain my clinical experience, as well as to keep my seniority when I start applying for a New Graduate Nurse RN position. By no means that I am picky when it comes to finding a job, any clinical nursing job will do for me. I have four years, as a LPN, working on a medical, surgical and long-term unit and now that I have forwarded my resume to Human Resources, I feel that HR and/or the managers do not consider LPN as nursing experience.

    Three weeks ago I went for my first interview on a Transitional Care Unit, and one week later the manager informed me that I am not the right candidate for the position, so I asked for feedback. Of course, I would like to know what I said wrong and what I can improve upon for my next interview. What she said surprised me cause (in her opinion) as a LPN and New Graduate RN, I am lacking in some skills (e.g., blood transfusion, chest tubes, NG tubes, PICCs). I did explain to the manager how these skills are initiated by RNs and the LPNs Scope of Practise is to assess and notify/collaborate with the RNs when caring for patients requiring these type of treatments.

    Sorry to vent, but I did not expect to find it this difficult to land a registered nurse position for the same company that I have been employed with for the past 9 years. I graduated from the BSN program in November 2013 and I am awaiting for the CRNE results at the moment. I am thankful that I maintained my registration with CLPNBC. That being said, is LPN not considered nursing experience when applying for a New Grad RN position? Any thoughts fellow LPNs/RNs??
    Wow. I am really sorry to hear this. The TCU not hiring you seems weird to me. It actually seems the perfect first step for you. The skills she listed are so easy that patients perform these on themselves at home. G-tubes and Picc lines? I let a CNA who is currently in nursing school administer the resident's medication and bolus feeding while observing her myself and offering her advice through this. A couple years ago, I allowed an LPN to administer ABT through picc line to a patient while guiding her every step of the way. I could be wrong, but when I worked as a tech in TCU, patients who still needed blood transfusions were still in med-surg, not with us. In fact, the majority of the nursing staff in our TCU were LPNs.
    No words of wisdom, just condolences. Good luck. And congratulations on your RN-BSN!
    canuck-nurse likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from SleeepyRN

    Wow. I am really sorry to hear this. The TCU not hiring you seems weird to me. It actually seems the perfect first step for you. The skills she listed are so easy that patients perform these on themselves at home. G-tubes and Picc lines? I let a CNA who is currently in nursing school administer the resident's medication and bolus feeding while observing her myself and offering her advice through this. A couple years ago, I allowed an LPN to administer ABT through picc line to a patient while guiding her every step of the way. I could be wrong, but when I worked as a tech in TCU, patients who still needed blood transfusions were still in med-surg, not with us. In fact, the majority of the nursing staff in our TCU were LPNs.
    No words of wisdom, just condolences. Good luck. And congratulations on your RN-BSN!
    Oh, and I do realize I may be flamed for allowing a couple people to practice outside their scope. I don't regret it.
  9. 1
    Quote from SleeepyRN
    I let a CNA who is currently in nursing school administer the resident's medication and bolus feeding while observing her myself and offering her advice through this. A couple years ago, I allowed an LPN to administer ABT through picc line to a patient while guiding her every step of the way.
    Talk about playing fast and loose with a license. Delegating tasks that are outside the delegee's scope of practice can get you in a lot of hot water. And when you allowed those people to do that, they were not there in the capacity of student.
    Pangea Reunited likes this.
  10. 1
    It could be hit or miss, depending on the organization and how they recognized LPN experience.

    When getting a job and entering a clinical ladder, the experience counts once you are at a position within a year, and it financially awarded, at least in my area; there are some places that accept the experience after there is significant RN experience, and some places don't count it at all.

    In my recent experience, I was able to get a supervisory position because of my LPN experience, but got a salary of a new nurse; however, the new job I have because of the experience I had as a LPN was taken into account, I receive a higher salary than my supervisory position.
    canuck-nurse likes this.
  11. 1
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Talk about playing fast and loose with a license. Delegating tasks that are outside the delegee's scope of practice can get you in a lot of hot water. And when you allowed those people to do that, they were not there in the capacity of student.
    I completely realize this. Ive done it twice in 2 years. My whole facility played fast and loose. ( not that they would be with me at a deposition.) In those 2 situations, I would still do it all over again. Like I said, I knew Id get flamed. So be it.
    hope3456 likes this.
  12. 3
    I was educated in Alberta and had the misfortune to work in BC once.

    Facilities in BC severely limit the skills and scope of PN practice regardless of their training.

    All the skills you mention are currently within the scope of my job her in AB and the majority were within your scope as an LPN in BC. You were limited in your practice by your previous units. Blood is a two nurse procedure. As an LPN you were responsible for verifying and monitoring the transfusion. The only real difference is now as an RN you are permitted to spike the bag. Chest tubes always looked after them, the dressing changes aren't complicated.

    I think there may be more to your story.

    Could your leadership skills be an issue?

    You might want this moved to the Canadian Forum for more feedback.
    loriangel14, joanna73, and LadyFree28 like this.


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