Your response to "there is a high demand for nurses"

  1. 0 It seems like I have been reading a lot of blog posts that continue to quote the Bureau of Labor Statistics report from 2012, stating that between 2010-2020, the RN workforce is estimated to be the top occupation in terms of job growth. The report estimates the number of RN jobs increasing over 700,000. But most of my friends who are currently looking for a position as an RN are having a lot of trouble getting anything. There is a ton of competition.

    So I'm curious...are these Bureau of Labor stats accurate in your area? Is there a thriving job market for RN's where you live? Or is it highly competitive? Thanks for your input!
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  3. Visit  Ecl09} profile page

    About Ecl09

    Joined Dec '13; Posts: 30; Likes: 14.

    13 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  applesxoranges} profile page
    2
    The issue is that the jobs are trying to cut back in terms of RNs. Unless you have mandated ratios, some places are on a hiring freeze and will not hire to replace RNs that have left. Overall, it's highly competitive. We have over 100 RNs graduating every six months. Those are 100 more RNs out in the workforce and most do not leave.
    Ecl09 and joanna73 like this.
  5. Visit  Tankweti} profile page
    1
    I live near Poughkeepsie New York which is within commuting distance of New York City and North Jersey and Connecticut. I have not been able to find anything in 4 years with a bachelor's and a 3.5. Many of my colleagues got work but they were either already employed as aides or had a relative working at the hospital. I made the fatal mistake of not getting an aide job while in school. It is all about the hospital and the unit getting to know your work habits and work ethic. I thought that knowing the material, meds, signs and symptoms was more important. Silly Rabbit! No one has ever asked about my grades.

    In regards to Labor Statistics, they are all fudged. If you don't believe it the look at the unemployment rate which is reported as way lower than it really is. People fall off the unemployment benefit rolls as they run out of benefits and Congress has not renewed them. This makes it look like thing are improving while in reality people are giving up looking. As far as projected nursing shortage I would bet that these numbers are coming from someone who stands to gain from stating these wrong facts. Do these numbers take into account that many hospitals are going belly up? Do they take into account that entire unit are being shut down and that experienced nurses are being laid off because they cost too much? Do they take into account that in New York and possibly other states there is a move to deregulate those with professional licenses, like nurses and respiratory therapists. If this happens it means unlicensed people who are paid $10 an hour can then legally perform many nursing tasks. The New York State Nurses Association is currently lobbying against this.
    zibi likes this.
  6. Visit  babyboobooexpress} profile page
    0
    Quote from Tankweti
    I live near Poughkeepsie New York which is within commuting distance of New York City and North Jersey and Connecticut. I have not been able to find anything in 4 years with a bachelor's and a 3.5. Many of my colleagues got work but they were either already employed as aides or had a relative working at the hospital. I made the fatal mistake of not getting an aide job while in school. It is all about the hospital and the unit getting to know your work habits and work ethic. I thought that knowing the material, meds, signs and symptoms was more important. Silly Rabbit! No one has ever asked about my grades.

    In regards to Labor Statistics, they are all fudged. If you don't believe it the look at the unemployment rate which is reported as way lower than it really is. People fall off the unemployment benefit rolls as they run out of benefits and Congress has not renewed them. This makes it look like thing are improving while in reality people are giving up looking. As far as projected nursing shortage I would bet that these numbers are coming from someone who stands to gain from stating these wrong facts. Do these numbers take into account that many hospitals are going belly up? Do they take into account that entire unit are being shut down and that experienced nurses are being laid off because they cost too much? Do they take into account that in New York and possibly other states there is a move to deregulate those with professional licenses, like nurses and respiratory therapists. If this happens it means unlicensed people who are paid $10 an hour can then legally perform many nursing tasks. The New York State Nurses Association is currently lobbying against this.
    4 years? In 2010 the market was actually pretty decent for new grad nurses. Were you only looking in the area you live in or were you also looking out of state/ across the country and in outpatient/ non-hospital settings?
  7. Visit  MrChicagoRN} profile page
    1
    "It seems like I have been reading a lot of blog posts that continue to quote the Bureau of Labor Statistics report from 2012, stating that between 2010-2020, the RN workforce is estimated to be the top occupation in terms of job growth. The report estimates the number of RN jobs increasing over 700,000. But most of my friends who are currently looking for a position as an RN are having a lot of trouble getting anything. There is a ton of competition.

    So I'm curious...are these Bureau of Labor stats accurate in your area?"

    That may all be true. But, there are a few things to consider:

    The growth of jobs is projected for a 10 year period. As nurses continue to age, get sick, retire, or die spots will open up. The population is aging and will need more care in the next decade. However, right now, a whole bunch of schools are making money cranking out a whole bunch of new grads every year. Currently the market can't support the influx of new grads, creating a backup in most markets.

    I think this will reverse in the next few years, but that doesn't make it any easier for those currently caught up in the logjam of unemployed graduate nurses.
    Ecl09 likes this.
  8. Visit  Annachu512} profile page
    1
    I'm in central Pennsylvania and had two job offers before even taking the NCLEX. We have lots of competition around here, at least 3 or 4 nursing schools that graduate 40+ new grads into the area. That includes Penn State Altoona. I graduated from Mount Aloysius and the floor I got hired on has at least 5 new grads from my class. Mount students are preferred over PSU ones from what hiring managers have said.

    The hiring issue depends on the area. This is not a big city but most of the grads here do not have any issues finding jobs, LPN or RN. Also, I am only an ADN. I'll be going for my Bachelor's this Fall.

    Good luck to everyone! I suggest being willing to move out of the area. Atlanta is hiring RNs big time. I'll be moving there in a few years.
    Ecl09 likes this.
  9. Visit  keylimesqueez} profile page
    1
    In response to the nursing shortage. I think it's all location, if you are willing to relocate, if you are willing to broaden your search and not limit yourself to acute care/specialty. Here in NOLA new grads are getting hired fairly quickly and even into specialties such as NICU (BSN, I don't know any ADN grads but I think they are fairing pretty well also since Charity is a top notch program). I also think that the naysayers re: nursing pay not being good and being an unstable position are narrow sighted. The starting rate for new grads in a local hospital is $28/hr before differential. Which is significantly higher Than my current pay as an experienced masters level research scientist. That is one reason I am switching gears and going into nursing.
    Ecl09 likes this.
  10. Visit  RNbellashadow} profile page
    2
    I live in the Midwest, med sized city with lots of nursing programs, and the job market is rough, esp for nurses without BSNs...... It probably is mostly location My parents live in rural America and nurses are getting hired pretty easily there.....
    HarryTheCat and Ecl09 like this.
  11. Visit  Ecl09} profile page
    0
    Thanks so much for your responses! I too am finding that new grads in my area are looking to move elsewhere for jobs. @Annachu512 I'll pass along the Atlanta tip as well

    Any input/advice from nurses or students on the West Coast??
  12. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    0
    Quote from Ecl09
    Any input/advice from nurses or students on the West Coast??
    I am originally from southern CA. Although I have eight years of paid nursing experience (4 yrs. of LVN experience and 4 yrs. of RN experience), I must remain in the state where I currently live because I am unable to secure employment in CA.

    It is even worse on new grads. According to statistics, 43 percent of all new grad RNs in CA are currently unemployed and seeking jobs.
  13. Visit  caliotter3} profile page
    0
    Should that tidbit come up in casual conversation, I would put the most stupid expression on my face and say something like, "That is why I've been unemployed for the last X number of months".
  14. Visit  HouTx} profile page
    1
    There is certainly a high demand for EXPERIENCED nurses in my neck of the woods - particularly those that are certified in a specialty. We are starting to see the resurgence of sign-on bonuses for ED, ICU & Periop nurses. I live in an area with a growing population - new hospitals are being built to handle the population increases and these facilities need nurses. Things are still pretty tight for new grads, especially ADNs who can't get hospital jobs.
    Ecl09 likes this.
  15. Visit  HarryTheCat} profile page
    1
    It's going to take time for the Nursing market to adjust to the current condition of oversupply. Over the last few years, many nursing schools bought into the "nursing shortage" myth and expanded their programs to accept more students. Other colleges and universities, looking to cash in on the potential influx of new tuition money, started new nursing programs from scratch. The result is that the U.S. is graduating something on the order of 150,000 to 170,000 new nurses every year, while the number of job openings runs around 120,000. These numbers are a bit "fuzzy", since they don't really differentiate between LPNs, ADNs and BSNs, but even accepting the lower number of 150,000 it means that there would, in just three years, be 90,000 new grad nurses who were unable to find work in their field or at the level of their education.

    Eventually we should see the market self-regulate, producing either more openings or fewer new grads. Some of the schools with marginal performance will lose accreditation or BON approvals. Prospective students will become better informed as consumers, choosing to stay away from underperforming or overpriced programs. The better schools will become more selective again, reversing some of the "come one, come all" approach to admissions. Unfortunately, until natural market forces reshape the nursing school industry there will be thousands of bright, talented, educated nurses out there struggling to compete in a crowded field of job applicants.

    Just my $0.02. Your mileage may vary.
    Ecl09 likes this.


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