Why are there no nursing jobs available for new grads? What is going on?? - page 5

I just graduated from an ASN program in May and I am about to take the NCLEX next week. I do currently have a temporary new grad license... But I just want to know why are there no jobs... Read More

  1. Visit  ElzorroRN profile page
    5
    I agree with this ladybug... you gotta do what you gotta do to get those first years of experience. I had to travel over 1k miles to get the the experiences I needed, and after that it was better, but not easier, you still gotta look hard for jobs... even with some years of experience you're still not entitled for anything.

    Good luck on your search, and if you have to move, move. It will only be a 1-2 years max. My first manager hired me in a town located in the middle of ********** and even She told me " you're bright and young, leave after 2 years or you'd die of loneliness here. (a town where Walmart and 99c stores were the hang out spots) So you don't even have to lie about staying there forever and giving them all until your last breadth. They understand.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Jun 26, '13 : Reason: TOS: profanity
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  3. Visit  ataymil8 profile page
    1
    I just graduated in May and passed my boards in early June. Resumes out all over the place. I have a BA in an unrelated field. I am going to be 52 in the fall, but still plan on getting my BSN. I'm beginning to think I've made a terrible mistake.
    dnsonthego likes this.
  4. Visit  cardiacrocks profile page
    3
    At my hospital we are so short staffed we hire a great deal of GN's. We keep expanding, this whole area is hiring. I live in upstate NY and work at a hospital in PA. Many GN's come from all over the country to get experience here. Good luck, you might have to consider moving for 1-2 years to gain the experience that you needs.
    anotherone, June59, and Twinmom06 like this.
  5. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    9
    Quote from vab229
    Ok you guys don't have to jump on me. But I know for a fact that a local hospital has nurses that are so old working there that they can barely walk up and down the hallways.
    What is it going to get to the point that you have a nurse coming into a patients room in a damn wheelchair with a magnifying glass to read the labels on the meds they are about to dispense?
    It is also terrible to promote nursing as career path that will have a steady need for employees and a promising job outlook. Don't you think it sucks that there are lets say 700 new grads and none of them can get a job anywhere? So what does that mean? That I am going to be stuck living at home with my mom supporting me (my mom who is an older nurse) and so then she won't ever be able to retire because I will be the monkey on her back for the next 5 years while I sit around waiting for a job? It seems like a viscous and kind of downright stupid circle.
    So basically this generation is screwed because nobody can/will retire. Then everyone wonders why there are so many people on the take.
    If I had to do it over again I wouldn't have even bothered. The whole scenario seems absolutely asinine.
    This is probably one of most hyperbolic posts I've read in a long time.

    Maybe the a reason you aren't getting job offers has less to do with the job market and more to do with your disdain for older nurses.

    FWIW, I've worked with nurses who had handicaps, and they were good nurses.
    Last edit by OCNRN63 on Jun 26, '13 : Reason: Sigh...
    icuRNmaggie, ricksy, Surprised1, and 6 others like this.
  6. Visit  PeacockMaiden profile page
    2
    It is the responsibility of the person who is contemplating nursing school to do research and fully understand the supply and demand.

    I did my research and knew it would be tough to find a job as a new grad in California, so it was not a surprise to me.

    I have been working in a skilled nursing facility for 11 months, and although it's not the ideal career I want, at least I'm working. 3/4 of my classmates also have jobs now, maybe not ideal jobs, but at least something.

    Maybe try SNFs, they seem new grad friendly.
    icuRNmaggie and June59 like this.
  7. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    6
    Ok you guys don't have to jump on me. But I know for a fact that a local hospital has nurses that are so old working there that they can barely walk up and down the hallways.
    What is it going to get to the point that you have a nurse coming into a patients room in a damn wheelchair with a magnifying glass to read the labels on the meds they are about to dispense?
    It is also terrible to promote nursing as career path that will have a steady need for employees and a promising job outlook. Don't you think it sucks that there are lets say 700 new grads and none of them can get a job anywhere? So what does that mean? That I am going to be stuck living at home with my mom supporting me (my mom who is an older nurse) and so then she won't ever be able to retire because I will be the monkey on her back for the next 5 years while I sit around waiting for a job? It seems like a viscous and kind of downright stupid circle.
    So basically this generation is screwed because nobody can/will retire. Then everyone wonders why there are so many people on the take.
    If I had to do it over again I wouldn't have even bothered. The whole scenario seems absolutely asinine.
    *** My question is, why did you decide to pursue a job field KNOWN to be very difficult to get a job in? Seems like you are angry that you made you bed and now have to lay in it.
  8. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from vab229
    I just graduated from an ASN program in May and I am about to take the NCLEX next week. I do currently have a temporary new grad license...

    But I just want to know why are there no jobs available? I live in Rhode Island and the employment here is horrible. Almost every single hospital that does have positions available wants at least 1-2 years of med-surg experience. How are we ever supposed to get experience if we can't get a job?? Even the few and far between positions for nurses at clinics and doctor's offices want 3-5 years experience, plus specialty experience. It is downright depressing.

    One of the reasons I chose the health care field was because "there would always be jobs available." That is such a lie. Whenever I tell people that I just graduated and will be an RN they always say, at least you will never be without a job! That is so false.

    When I spoke with the nurses at the hospitals where I did my clinical rotations, they said they felt so bad for us and how back in the 80's hospitals were begging them to take positions and even offering sign on bonuses.

    I just feel like it will be so long before I ever find a job that I won't remember half of the stuff I learned
    Things have changed so much in both in the profession, healthcare and the general economy since the 1980's.

    Back then for all the glamour nursing was still mainly a pink collar ghetto job. Wages were low (starting at around $17K per year for new grads in NYC) and you didn't end up much better after several years working either. You could earn the same or more money working as a secretary or anywhere else without all the hassles. As such interest in nursing as a career was falling off a cliff. Many programs closed due to lack of enrollments and those that remained open you could often get in without all the testing, having a 4.0 GPA and endless wait lists of today. For most of the CUNY programs for instance here in NYC long as you had the 2.5 in nursing prerequisites and met the other qualifications you got in usually the first time applied.

    Because of all this yes, during the 1980's and some of the 1990's places were begging for nurses. No one predicted several things:

    the recent economic meltdown and financial crisis,

    that so many would enroll and graduate from nursing programs,

    changes in federal and insurance reimbursements

    and that the better wages for experienced/seasoned nurses would cause many to return to the bedside and or not leave as predicted.

    If you graduated in the 1980's you'd only be in your 50's now and have >20 years of solid nursing experience under your belt. To many facilities such nurses are like catnip. They do not require extensive orientation like new grads and have a proven track record, what is not to love?

    From the experienced nurse's side of things again if you graduated in the 1980's you know how puny wages were, but now you can make BANK in comparison especially if you pick up OT and or travel.

    Finally at least where you are concerned there is the push towards BSN nurses. Between second degree, RN to BSN schemes and undergraduate programs there simply are large numbers of four year nurses out there to meet whatever openings that hospitals have. At least the larger and or prestigious ones in large urban areas like NYC.

    You may wish to consider relocated to another area where hiring is taking place for ADN nurses, getting your experience and perhaps enrolling in a RN to BSN program. It is big sucks on these hospitals to have a revolving door of new grads that come and stay for a few years then head home, but that is the only way many newly licensed nurses are getting enough experience to have larger places look at them.
    June59 likes this.
  9. Visit  Nurse_Diane profile page
    6
    Quote from vab229
    I don't know......
    A local psych hospital got rid of all of their older nurses last year by offering "early retirement packages".
    Yeah, those "older nurses" are/were very experienced, I'm sure! Why do they need them anyways ?!!! Us "older nurses" sure do get in everyone's way, huh? Let's hire 20-something new grads to get things in line, eh?
    joanna73, OCNRN63, Kimbsntobe, and 3 others like this.
  10. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    4
    Quote from vab229
    I just graduated from an ASN program in May and I am about to take the NCLEX next week. I do currently have a temporary new grad license...

    But I just want to know why are there no jobs available? I live in Rhode Island and the employment here is horrible. Almost every single hospital that does have positions available wants at least 1-2 years of med-surg experience. How are we ever supposed to get experience if we can't get a job?? Even the few and far between positions for nurses at clinics and doctor's offices want 3-5 years experience, plus specialty experience. It is downright depressing.

    One of the reasons I chose the health care field was because "there would always be jobs available." That is such a lie. Whenever I tell people that I just graduated and will be an RN they always say, at least you will never be without a job! That is so false.

    When I spoke with the nurses at the hospitals where I did my clinical rotations, they said they felt so bad for us and how back in the 80's hospitals were begging them to take positions and even offering sign on bonuses.

    I just feel like it will be so long before I ever find a job that I won't remember half of the stuff I learned
    Here's another thing:

    Hospitals already *know* what happens when vast numbers of senior experienced nurses are laid off and replaced with new grads and or those who are inexperienced, in short a whole lotta problems!

    Back when managed care ravaged healthcare the bean counters convinced hospitals to get rid of the experienced nurses because they were the ones pulling big money (if you could call it that). Then they brought in lots of new grads or those with fresh licenses but not allot of experience. What happened? Error rates often shot through the roof resulting in not only poor patient care but lots of adverse reactions.

    What the bean counters didn't think through is that a seasoned nurse is a walking and breathing body of knowledge that can often run circles around new grads. Without experienced nurses and or enough of them there weren't nearly enough to precept/orientate new grads and teach them what they need to know in order to transition from former student to competent professional.

    So yes, that experience nurse may be 50 or even older but whilst you were doing something else she was nursing and probably has forgotten more than most new grads know.
    icuRNmaggie, MBARNBSN, June59, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  CapeCodMermaid profile page
    7
    I have 2 full time and 4 part time positions I can't fill. Not to generalize but since I'm one of the old nurses you want to retire.....the new grads I interview are ill prepared to actually work. They've never had to carry a full load of patients and most of them have no critical thinking skills. I'd love to be able to hire some new grads but, frankly, I'm not sure I have the time to train them.
    joanna73, MBARNBSN, applewhitern, and 4 others like this.
  12. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    9
    Quote from vab229
    What is it going to get to the point that you have a nurse coming into a patients room in a damn wheelchair with a magnifying glass to read the labels on the meds they are about to dispense?
    So you're suggesting that people who need accommodations have no place in nursing?

    Funny thing is, I carry a magnifying glass to read vials on occasion. And yet, I'm willing to be that every patient would far rather have me start lines on them than you.
    icuRNmaggie, nur18, joanna73, and 6 others like this.
  13. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    4
    Quote from vab229
    That is a good point you made about the older RNs who can't retire. But wouldn't it be smarter for the hospitals to lay off or offer early retirement to the older RNs and hire new RNs who I am sure will get paid a lot less than what RNs who have been working for 30+ years make, plus all their sick/vacation time they have accrued? Whoever is running the hospitals doesn't seem to be too intelligent. The hospital my mom used to work at is in shambles and half of the units are closed down. It is such a mess
    Seriously?! This is your solution? Lay off someone who most certainly NEEDS their nursing job (or else they'd probably not be working it) so that jobs are available for totally inexperienced nurses to fill? Now that'd be an intelligent decision made by management.....
    MBARNBSN, OCNRN63, June59, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  mdhale profile page
    0
    I'm in the boat with you! I graduated in May and am taking the NCLEX in 2 weeks.....same thing...there are hundreds of nursing jobs in Colorado but you have to have experience! I don't get it! How can you get experience if you can't get hired without experience? Does anyone have any suggestions about where to start?


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