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DoGoodThenGo

DoGoodThenGo

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  1. DoGoodThenGo

    How can I appeal the decision ofthe NY state board of Nursing?

    Was able to find an America Health Care school of PN that was shut down in PA, but nothing for NYS. America Health Care, Inc. LAWSUIT In any event as the NYS board hasn't rendered a decision on your license application there isn't anything to appeal. If and or when you receive a denial then you can take/seek appropriate action. Am confused as others as to why merely attending a nursing program that was closed or whatever has landed you in the NYS BON's crosshairs for "moral character" review. Unless you were in on whatever offences those running the nursing program were accused or somehow more than just a student nurse, don't see the connection. NYS is clear on "moral character" for those seeking licensure: Moral Character Requirements You must demonstrate that you are currently of good moral character in order to be licensed or registered as an RN or LPN. When you apply for an RN or LPN license or to renew your registration, you will be required to answer the following questions: •Have you been found guilty after trial, or pleaded guilty, no contest or nolo contendere to a crime (felony or misdemeanor) in any court? •Are criminal charges pending against you in any court? Has any licensing or disciplinary authority refused to issue you a license or ever revoked, annulled, cancelled, accepted surrender of, suspended, placed on probation, refused to renew a professional licensed or certificate held by you now or previously, or ever fined, censured, reprimanded or otherwise disciplined you? •Are charges pending against you in any jurisdiction for any sort of professional misconduct? •Has any hospital or licensed facility restricted or terminated your professional training, employment or privileges or have you ever voluntarily or involuntarily resigned or withdrawn from such association to avoid imposition of such measures? A "yes answer" to one or more of these questions will not necessarily disqualify you from a license or a registration. The New York State Education Department decides on a case by case basis whether prior criminal conviction(s) or other issues will disqualify the applicant from being licensed or registered as an RN or LPN. 400 Bad Request Did you attend then graduate from this "America Health Care" school of nursing and file an application for licensure to NYS or anywhere else? More to the point did such an application result in a denial based upon where you graduated (first school of nursing), and did you inform NYS of all this when applying for licensure now after subsequently attending and graduating from a different program? If answer to above is "yes" then it *might* be NYS is taking a closer look at your application because of exactly reason given; you once attended a school what was closed, and even though you went on to someplace else they want to take their time. Personally would just sit tight and wait for word from NYS one way or another. People hear or see the words "Moral Character" in regards to a pending nursing license and think the state is calling them a loose tart or something. When you can see from above NYS does have a rather general if not broad meaning assigned to those words.
  2. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    Congrats on a life well lived. You probably have forgotten more about SI than I know. Sadly the place is changing, though live in Manhattan a good part of my family (including widowed mother) are still on SI, so am out there often. Used to think would retire back "home", but increasingly don't see that as an option. SI is just getting too crowded and congested for my tastes; and traffic is terrible. Yes, they do need more senior housing as well as affordable on SI; but no one wants apartments/high density. Did you look into the Farm Colony or whatever they are calling former Seaview Hospital campus turned into senior housing? Seems incredible that back in day Staten Island had less population but five acute care hospitals (Staten Island, Richmond Memorial, Doctor's, USPHS, and Saint Vincent's), but now with more people there are only three; Richmond University and the two campuses of Staten Island University Hospital. This yet there are still the same three (more or less) schools of nursing on SI; Saint Vincent's (now Saint Paul's), College of Staten Island and Wagner. Am guessing many grads find themselves going to Brooklyn, Manhattan or NJ since cannot imagine the hospitals of SI can absorb all those newly licensed nurses that arrive like clockwork every six or so months. It may not be in either of our lifetimes (am about forty years younger), but the old USPSH/BS campus will be developed into something. At nearly 25 acres with much of it having great views of the Narrows, it is just too valuable to leave sitting to rot and ruin. BdeB, Debbie Rose and city government in general is pushing development for Saint George/North Shore area. They've already go Urby, and the Lighthouse apartments, and IIRC plans are for rezoning more of the Bay Street corridor. *If* they can get density and demographics to support, maybe in twenty or so years a much smaller hospital *might* open on USPHS campus. Something In short what became of Saint Vincent's, and is becoming of Beth Israel; a small acute care hospital without an ER, but some sort of urgent care center apart from main hospital but nearby.
  3. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    This pretty much spells out why USPSH/Bayley Seton closed: PROGNOSIS FOR S.I. HOSPITAL: GOOD AS GONE - NY Daily News Nothing has really changed since, in fact things have only really gotten worse. Costs to renovate or whatever that physical plant likely are double or triple estimates given in above article. Even then that would still give you a huge hospital with far too many inpatient beds for the modern trend favoring outpatient care. Article also pretty much tells why nothing is "happening" at BS hospital. As you know Staten Island residents for most part are famously anti-development and against high density. Logical use for BS campus would be some sort of housing, especially for seniors which SI desperately needs. But locals don't want that either, and after the whole Mount Manresa mess people are spoiling for a fight.
  4. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    No, don't think there was any way of saving the PHS hospitals. If they had survived Ronald Reagan and GOP "federal budget cut" mania of early 1980's by now most would likely have gone either way. Whatever stated early goals for the PHS hospitals were, by the 1970's most had large patient loads of poor/indigent. Merchant Seaman (who by even 1970's and 1980's were well enough paid) represented a small number of patients. Immigrants long since stopped arriving by ship loads to major harbor cities, but came by airplane. All having had their health screened/checked before leaving their home countries. If PHS hospitals began taking payments for inpatient care it is/was all but certain the large numbers of indigent would be on Medicaid and or Medicare. So again federal hospitals would have been in direct competition with private institutions. In order to attract high paying/well insured patients all those old PHS hospitals would have needed huge renovations to bring them up to (then) modern local and accreditation standards (as federal hospitals they got a pass). Congress and Reagan were in no mood to provide that kind of money. I remember the old PHS hospital on SI with all those open wards. They were great for bed making, taking vital signs, handing out and collecting meal trays, AM or PM care and so forth (station supplies at front and work one's way down and around the beds...), but totally a no-no far as NYS and accreditation standards had been for ages. Semi-private and or private rooms were mandated, for one thing in order to receive Medicaid/Medicare payments. PUBLIC HEALTH HOSPITAL ON S.I. ORDERED TO CLOSE - The New York Times Marine Hospital - Free Healthcare For US Mariners? - Professional Mariner Forum - gCaptain Forum Marine Hospital - Free Healthcare For US Mariners? - Professional Mariner Forum - gCaptain Forum
  5. Forgot to mention the "Q" train connects at 33rd Street PATH station. That opens up options to commute from east side Manhattan hospitals to areas of New Jersey served by that system, and or at least easily reached.
  6. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    Was born and raised on SI, and knew the old USPHS hospital well. Also agree with much of what you are saying, but fast forward to the 2000's or even 2010 and beyond highly doubt even Bayley would have survived, well again not as a full service acute care in that huge building. Reagan in a way was correct and foresaw by a few decades where healthcare was going. Federal government already provided for the care of poor/indigent via Medicaid, and veterans/military via the VA and or government health insurance schemes. Medicaid in particular began the long, slow and painful reckoning that hit and continues to affect "charity care/hospitals of last resort". Saint Vincent's isn't the only nor last religious affiliated healthcare network to go bust recently. In theory Medicaid patients can go anywhere, and many do choose other places than charity hospitals. Saint Vincent's had many faults with their business model (along with it seems some *VERY* bad management and advisors), but their main downfall was that wealthy/well insured patients viewed the place as just that a charity hospital and simply refused to go, preferring the wealthy east side/uptown Manhattan places like NYP, Mount Sinai, and NYU. Indeed if you believe Mount Sinai/Beth Israel the closing of Saint Vincent's had no real affect on their utilization rates and or ER visits. This is why they are largely getting away with shutting down and tearing down Beth Israel with little protest from NYS. Back to Staten Island, the North Shore has seen dramatic changes in demographics/population since the 1980's. The flight out of Saint George/Tompkinsville, etc... that began when Staten Island Hospital packed up and moved to Ocean Breeze picked up steam as one by one other large institutions (HIP, College of Staten Island, etc...) left as well. Simply put there just doesn't seem to be a large nor stable enough pool of wealthy/well insured patients to support two hospitals on North Shore. Remember no one wanted to buy Saint Vincent's on Bard Avenue either. Had (then) nearly bankrupt Bayonne hospital hadn't stepped in ST.V's would have closed because again no one wanted the place. This coupled with fact many on North Shore wouldn't go to Bayley Seton nor Saint Vincent's then nor now if their lives depended. Rather they go off to Ocean Breeze/South Shore to Staten Island University Hospital. None of this even begins to touch the strong refocus of healthcare delivery in USA favoring shorter inpatient stays coupled with more community/ambulatory/clinic based services. If any of the major healthcare players in NYC thought they could make it work, they would have taken USPHS campus. North Shore-LIJ (now Northwell) who already own two of the three major hospitals on SI, and are swimming in money (they just purchased an entire city block on UES of Manhattan), in particular comes to mind. But again no one would touch the place which is why the city (HHC) stepped in and opened that new clinic. In summation problem with healthcare on Staten Island is the place just that; an island. While plenty of resident can and do choose to go into Manhattan or elsewhere for care, you aren't going to be bringing large numbers of people from say lower Manhattan or South Brooklyn onto SI. Thus you are left with native population. As things stand now Richmond University Hospital (formerly Saint Vincent's) seems to serve the North Shore population well enough. They are now affiliated with Mount Sinai which should bring in more money and other benefits.
  7. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    If by returning to a full service acute hospital as "activity", forget it, just won't happen. The Sisters tried to get any of the large NYC private hospitals (IIRC) to take over BS, and none were interested. That building and campus are just too large to be remotely profitable for a healthcare system. BAYLEY-SETON HOSPITAL - NYS GOVERNOR'S OFFICE FOR MOTION PICTURE & TELEVISION DEVELOPMENT
  8. Just bumping this up to add since my original posts the new Second Avenue Subway (SAS) has opened making subway travel to and from the UES/Yorkville much easier. The "Q" train makes getting from Queens, much of Brooklyn and even Westside of Manhattan far easier than before, and in many cases a one seat subway ride. That and or one can use free bus to subway (or vice versa) transfers. Most used station is 72nd and Second Avenue which isn't surprising as the most southern entrance/exit is down near 69th Street. This makes getting to UES "hospital row" (NYP, Sloane Kettering, Rockefeller, Mary Manning Walsh) just a two block walk. Indeed all the UES/Yorkville healthcare facilities including Gracie Square are a far easier commute than in past. Previously you had to walk (or take bus) several blocks to Lexington Avenue for nearest subway, or take a cross town bus to west side. Certain times of day (shift changes) the Q train is a sea of blue, green, purple, cranberry and other color scrubs/uniforms! *LOL* Second Ave. Sagas - A New York City Subway Blog :: Second Ave. Sagas mta.info | Guide This New NYC Subway Map Shows the Second Avenue Line, So It Has to Really Be Happening For OP and others all this means thanks to the Q (which runs deep into Brooklyn/Coney Island), there are more options for finding housing and still take employment at any of the UES/Yorkville health facilities. Via transfers to the "F" or "N/R/W" trains much of Brooklyn and Queens can be reached as well.
  9. DoGoodThenGo

    Anyone Remember The United States Public Health Service Hospitals?

    Actually there has: Mayor de Blasio Cuts Ribbon on Staten Island's New NYC Health + Hospitals Community Health Center | City of New York City Breaks Ground on $25M Medical Facility in Clifton - Clifton - New York - DNAinfo City's new Island health facility opening this fall; cost doubles | SILive.com Although to be clear 165 Vanderbilt Avenue is next to the old Bayley Seton (formerly USPHS hospital), and thus not part of main campus. Never the less it was owned and part of the former Saint Vincent's Medical Center/Sisters of Charity health network on SI. Problem with the main USPHS/Bayley Seton campus is what ails and has lead to closing of other huge old barns of hospital campuses. It simply is too large and thus ill suited to modern healthcare where the focus is on less inpatient and more outpatient. That is despite what many on Staten Island claim (and other parts of NYC as well), there are too many inpatient beds chasing fewer and fewer patients as stays are shortened for acute care. Even back when Saint Vincent's owned the place they were losing money: Bankrupt St. Vinny's puts S.I. assets on block There are no end of plans or schemes for the campus, but nothing really ever seems to happen. Future of Bayley Seton site: Revamped community center and plans for a green campus | SILive.com
  10. Don't want to post link because while a "news" item is really only about local New York. Anyway the Real Deal is reporting today that the College of Mount Saint Vincent has filled plans for a new building that will house both dorms and school of nursing. From article: "Riverdale's College of Mount Saint Vincent is planning to add a new six-story, 91-unit building to its campus. The school filed plans with the Department of Buildings on Monday for a building at 6301 Riverdale Avenue that will span roughly 60,000 square feet. It will contain space for dorm rooms and a nursing school."
  11. DoGoodThenGo

    Bellevue Hospital (NYC) School of Nursing Grads - Save Your Cap

    Nope, they're not and don't expect they ever will; not for the money seller is asking. Again a museum, collector, alumni society or whatever likely would love to have that lot; but no one has that kind of money lying about spare. Also as noted there isn't really anything anyone can really do with them other than for collectors/display purposes. At least here in NYC area haven't seen a cap in ages, and that includes during Nurses Week. This much less at or anywhere near Bellevue. Besides those caps would need to be restored to white or something close enough (which may not be possible), and likely material is too fragile for shoving pins into that are needed to anchor the things down onto head. Quite honestly am surprised that "family of nurses" themselves didn't donate those caps to Bellevue's alumni society or something. Anyway we can only hope after several more months of not even a nibble seller will see sense,and either drop his price of just donate the things.
  12. DoGoodThenGo

    Bellevue Hospital (NYC) School of Nursing Grads - Save Your Cap

    Asking ain't getting. *LOL* Seller has been trying for over two months to get his asking price with no takers. No one is even "watching" the auctions. Give it a few more weeks or months and (hopefully) the man will see sense. I mean it isn't as if caps are standard issue and or worn today. Only persons willing to pay big money (in relative terms) are collectors, alumni associations and or perhaps a graduate seeking to replace one she lost.
  13. DoGoodThenGo

    Bellevue Hospital (NYC) School of Nursing Grads - Save Your Cap

    Yes, there is: Bellevue Alumnae Center for Nursing History - Foundation of New York State Nurses In fact there seem to be a couple of archive sources littered about: Bellevue School of Nursing | Lillian & Clarence de la Chapelle Medical Archives It just might very well be that the alumni association, archives or other sources are well supplied with caps donated or otherwise sourced. They likely surely don't have $3k to plunk down for a set of caps. When you consider how many nurses today consider caps and or whites medieval, any begging cup passed around might come up quite empty. On another note an interesting article about the movement of nursing education out of hospitals and into colleges as it related to Bellevue and Hunter College. ""Nurses' Training May Be Shifted": The Story of Bellevue and Hunter College, 1942-1969" by Lewenson, Sandra B. - Nursing History Review, Vol. 21, January 1, 2
  14. DoGoodThenGo

    Bellevue Hospital (NYC) School of Nursing Grads - Save Your Cap

    Yes, seller is really being a terminal of the pudendal artery. Vintage nursing caps do go for big money, but not several thousands of dollars. Seller is a pawn shop, so one wonders how bad things must have been for last owners of these caps that they pawned them for money. Do not know but am willing to bet they didn't get $3k or more in cash for their efforts. Historically Bellevue School of Nursing caps were some of the most difficult to obtain for those who did not graduate from program. The school kept things on a tight lead and without proper credentials the pin and cap were impossible to obtain. IIRC Kay's caps *might* have the pattern, but Bellevue is one of those which require some sort of documentation before ordering. When the process began to merge Bellevue with Hunter college alumni of the former, current students and others connected made quite a noise about CUNY students possibly getting their mitts on Bellevue's famed cap. Hunter shot back that per negotiations Bellevue's cap and pin would remain property of that school, and in any event they had their own anyway. Hopefully seller will come to his senses and realize he isn't going to fund his retirement from those caps. Thus freeing them to be taken by an alumni, related association and or go into a museum where they belong.
  15. DoGoodThenGo

    Transgender patient and a dilemma

    You might want to reach out to Mount Sinai here in NYC to see if they can offer any insight. Over the past several years they've developed an extensive dedicated transgender healthcare service (IIRC the only one in NYC). https://www.mountsinai.org/locations/center-transgender-medicine-surgery
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