Concealed Carry...as a nurse? - page 2

by mcknis

24,427 Visits | 223 Comments

With the current news over gun control and gun rights legislation being pushed through Congress as a result of the tragedies of Aurora, CO, Newtown, CT and the others like them, the thought of concealed carry among healthcare... Read More


  1. 10
    Quote from AngelfireRN
    I have my CC permit. I keep Bessie in the car. She goes to work with me (at a clinic) and has been known to make an appearance when there's a threat against myself, my staff, or others, during which time she sat on my desk, out of range of patients. The rest of the time she stays in the car.
    My boss is fully on board and supportive. When you do pain management, you can't be too careful.
    ETA: I always carried Bessie, in the car, even when I worked hospital. Management knew, and no one ever said boo about it.
    Floored that you would brandish a firearm in your workplace as a means to intimidate a patient. You have made some suspect comments in the past, but this is truly the most unprofessional thing I have seen on this website. Ashamed and embarrassed by you/for you.
    RN-Cardiac, sapphire18, jtmarcy12, and 7 others like this.
  2. 26
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Floored that you would brandish a firearm in your workplace as a means to intimidate a patient. You have made some suspect comments in the past, but this is truly the most unprofessional thing I have seen on this website. Ashamed and embarrassed by you/for you.
    I never said I brandished my weapon. It's there in the event that someone carries out a threat to enter the clinic or return to the clinic armed. I don't find it unprofessional to protect myself and those I work with. In the 2 or so years I've been there, my manager asked me to bring it in one time. It stayed in my desk, in the holster, and was never brought out again after that day. This was after a threat by a former patient was made, and it was not my decision to bring it inside.

    My weapon has only ever been fired at a target, on a practice range. I have never brandished it to anyone, at any time. It is in my car if I have need of it, because I drive almost an hour each way to work, through questionable areas and on back roads. I keep my certifications current, and I am well within my legal rights to keep a weapon on my person if I so choose. I choose not to.

    Call it unprofessional if you want. Be embarrassed and ashamed for yourself, not for me. I never said it was used as an intimidation tactic, not once. But my boss, my OM, and our local law enforcement would tend to disagree with you.

    And before you judge me, please consider this...I work in a clinic that dispenses controlled substances. We routinely dismiss patients or refuse to prescribe controls to patients that fail drug screens or fail to comply with clinic policy. I practice in a rural area, where about 90% of the general populace is armed. They bring their weapons to the clinic. Now, you tell me...given the area, given the type of clinic, and given the fact that there are usually one or more young children present ( two of them under one year of age), why on EARTH is it unprofessional of me to have a weapon in my car in the event that it might be needed?

    As was said, I am within my rights, within the law, and bring the weapon inside only upon the request of my supervising physician. And those are the only entities I need to please.
    GM2RN, RunBabyRun, nae312213, and 23 others like this.
  3. 3
    To AngelfireRN - my guess was Texas. A strong NRA state.

    Read your last post - tough place to work. No further comment to stir up anything!

    One last thing - it is on my 'bucket list' to just go to a firing range and take a few practice shots at a target. Just to say/get the feel of handling a firearm. Want nothing else more to do with them!
    maelstrom143, DawnJ, and AngelfireRN like this.
  4. 10
    It can be tough...the NP that took over for me during my maternity leave ran screaming. It's an acquired thing, but I love it. Yep, by most measurers, I'm unprofessional. I'm brassy, I have NO filter, and I pretty much am the biggest redneck you'll ever run across. But I'm a dang good NP and I always have been in good standing with my respective boards, as well as most of my patients. They're not the most educated, the most couth, or the most likable people on the planet, but the vast majority of them are wonderful.

    It's a benefit of being raised in the sticks.

    Oh, and we do NRA down here, too!

    Your local PD may offer gun safety classes, that's where I did mine. Ask them if they do and knock that off the list! It may just change your feelings about them!
    NurseSDP, hoppingpete, maelstrom143, and 7 others like this.
  5. 23
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    this is truly the most unprofessional thing I have seen on this website.
    Ha!!! Not even close.
    Last edit by redhead_NURSE98! on Jan 30, '13
    RunBabyRun, maelstrom143, DroogieRN, and 20 others like this.
  6. 4
    I'm, not really a fan of firearms! Just leave it for law enforcer's use!I voted for the last option
    psu_213, jtmarcy12, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
  7. 2
    My husband and I took a gun safety class. While we do not currently own firearms I see no problem with those who do. I don't suggest bringing it into work.. Sounds like an accident waiting to happen.
    somenurse and nrsang97 like this.
  8. 9
    As someone who works at the Aurora hospital where most of the theater shooting victims were taken, I'm a strong proponent of gun control (I was before the Aurora shooting). Every hospital I've worked at has had a "no firearms" policy, with a sign to that effect posted at the front door. The idea of more people with concealed carry frightens me. As someone else said, let's leave the law enforcement to the people who are trained to do that.
    sapphire18, Benedina, jtmarcy12, and 6 others like this.
  9. 6
    I know of an ER doctor who used to conceal carry at work. His employer made him stop bringing his gun to work. Shortly after he stopped doing so, a man brought in for drug/alcohol testing by police gained control of a police officer's firearm in the same ER and opened fire, killing one officer and injuring several other innocent bystanders before a lockdown and manhunt took place at/around the hospital. It lasted several hours before the suspect was located.

    The same ER doctor was working that day. He took cover under a desk in the ER while shots were fired, and then called in the shooting from the deceased officer's radio after the suspect fled.

    I'm the child of a police officer. I support strict gun control. And I know that there's no saying what would've happened if said doctor was able to carry his weapon to work; he could've stopped the shooting sooner, or caused more injury and chaos (after all, I have no idea if he was an excellent marksman or not). But it makes you think about what might have been, does it not?
  10. 1
    Quote from klone
    As someone who works at the Aurora hospital where most of the theater shooting victims were taken, I'm a strong proponent of gun control (I was before the Aurora shooting). Every hospital I've worked at has had a "no firearms" policy, with a sign to that effect posted at the front door. The idea of more people with concealed carry frightens me. As someone else said, let's leave the law enforcement to the people who are trained to do that.
    I see both sides of it as I work in the D.C. area and a few years back a deceased patient's son brought a gun into a Baltimore hospital, opened fire and killed several people. I have also cared for suicidal and homicidal patients in the ER who have brought loaded guns in from home. We have no metal detectors and and while our security is awesome, they do not carry guns.
    RunBabyRun likes this.


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