Do you give back-rubs and foot baths to your patients? - pg.3 | allnurses

Do you give back-rubs and foot baths to your patients? - page 3

As a rule, if I'm not too tired, I always give backrubs and take care of my patients feet and legs. I do this on all of them. Others only wash their face and hands and that constitutes a bath. ... Read More

  1. Visit  DizzyLizzyNurse profile page
    0
    I'm a touchy feely person. I like hugs from friends. When I worked LTC I'd give back scratches and back rubs to a few residents I was close to. Now that I'm med/surge, I don't get to know anyone well enough to give a back rub. I do rub lotion on people's feet if ordered.
  2. Visit  redhead_NURSE98! profile page
    2
    Quote from Cerriwin
    Back rubs, foot rubs, a good scalp massage...heck, if they're really cranky I'll sit and snuggle with them for an hour or so. Of course, things are a little different in the NICU.
    LMAO (I was thinking "Ewww, SNUGGLE with them?")

    - Med Surg Nurse
    IndyElmer and wooh like this.
  3. Visit  TX.RN.Shannon profile page
    3
    Quote from Cerriwin
    Back rubs, foot rubs, a good scalp massage...heck, if they're really cranky I'll sit and snuggle with them for an hour or so. Of course, things are a little different in the NICU.
    I was getting kinda grossed out thinking about doing this with some of my patients...until I saw the NICU part. :-)
    wannabecnl, wooh, and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
  4. Visit  not.done.yet profile page
    3
    I just wanna say - the disciples were Jesus' friends. I would rub the back of a friend or wash their feet, no problem. I am comfortable with them. But I don't remember Jesus rubbing backs and feet of strangers. He did heal them though - which I work hard to do my part in.
    Altra, ElSea, and wooh like this.
  5. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    3
    Nope. Too weird. Maybe in more innocent times.... But those days are long gone.

    I *am* a big believer of warming up some Vicks with hand friction, and then massaging it into my elderly pt's sore hands/knees. Works great for arthritis.
  6. Visit  Been there,done that profile page
    1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Nope. Too weird. Maybe in more innocent times.... But those days are long gone.

    I *am* a big believer of warming up some Vicks with hand friction, and then massaging it into my elderly pt's sore hands/knees. Works great for arthritis.
    Excellent idea Brandon.. will try it on myself and others.

    Just wondering... is this a treatment.. that we would need an order for ?
    imintrouble likes this.
  7. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Nope. Too weird. Maybe in more innocent times.... But those days are long gone.

    I *am* a big believer of warming up some Vicks with hand friction, and then massaging it into my elderly pt's sore hands/knees. Works great for arthritis.
    The Menthol LTC, huh? I'm kidding. My mother thought Vicks cured everything Karo Syrup and Calamine Lotion didn't, including swallowing a little bit of it for a persistent dry cough.
  8. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Excellent idea Brandon.. will try it on myself and others.Just wondering... is this a treatment.. that we would need an order for ?
    Not if nobody knows but you, the resident and the four walls! (seriously, I really doubt you need an order fro some Vicks)
  9. Visit  nrsang97 profile page
    0
    I never really gave a "back rub" per se, but I would rub on some lotion after a bath on the pts back and legs. Sometimes we would rub into their back or feet the protective ointment that smells like cloves it their skin was super dry and flaky.


    I would also rub their back after Chest PT.

    I worked ICU by the way.
    Last edit by nrsang97 on Sep 12, '12 : Reason: added
  10. Visit  wooh profile page
    1
    My babies get all the snuggles and rubs they need (assuming I have time.) Older kids? For my kids with CP, they generally get some good rubbing if I've got time for it, especially if they don't have a parent with them. All that spasticity has to hurt, especially the ones who are getting twisted scoliosis backs.
    When I did adults, the older folks would get some back rubs if I had time, but that was RARE.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  11. Visit  PediLove2147 profile page
    0
    I hate feet and I am terrible at back rubs, I don't even give my husband back rubs. There are a lot of things I will do for my patients but those are not included. I will rub in lotion of course but I think that's different.

    I had a patient whose wife applied lotion and then per his request massaged him. That's fine, BUT she then went to his butt and the man got a full rub down. At home people, not the hospital.
  12. Visit  Glycerine82 profile page
    2
    I give back rubs and foot rub to my geriatric patients ( my little old people I call them) hehe. I also give hugs and kisses but only to the adorable older ones. I don't usually do much touching to the younger generations unless there is a need for it. I'll put lotion on someone's back no matter what age if it's part of am care but not just because. I had this sweeeet 92 year old British lady that I spoiled the crap out of last week. She was so darn cute. Made me Laugh every time she said knickers heheheh. I dread the day I no longer have time for this stuff......

    "No day but today"
    DizzyLizzyNurse and wannabecnl like this.
  13. Visit  Wet Noodle profile page
    0
    In the old days, massage was part of the bedside nursing protocol. In fact, it's still mentioned as such in nursing fundamentals classes. Now not only is there no time for such "luxuries," but it's clear that some nurses are grossed out by the idea, either because they have their own touch issues, or they find some feet to be repellant.

    I understand that it may not be appropriate for a nurse without any training in massage to do much more than a back rub, and that it's generally not appropriate for a psychiatric nurse, etc., but, as a licensed massage therapist, I find some of comments troubling.

    Massage itself is therapeutic. I wish more hospitals had programs where LMTs with training in medical massage volunteer to treat patients who are receptive to the idea.


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